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Michael Landy - Acts of Kindness

 
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Young men tend to treat each other with a mixture of indifference and hostility, so it was a real surprise for me when my son Thomas was born and I used to carry him around everywhere in a sling, that I'd get into conversation with groups of teenage boys on the Tube. It seemed that the baby had defused any possible threat I might carry, and they would suddenly be happy to chat to a stranger.

A couple of years back, a young lady had a problem with her Oyster at Bond Street. She'd waited until 7pm to touch in but she'd been charged the higher rate. When she got here the ticket office was shut so I couldn't do anything about it. I told her to ring the help people to sort it out and gave her the number. A couple of days later she came through and said thank you and she was really grateful for my help.

Once, I was on the Tube travelling back from my friends' house in Clapham. An Aussie guy got up and made everyone play musical chairs - every stop for about 10 stops, it was still going when I had to get off. Some of us were very English and reserved at first, then politely amused, but in the end he got us all joining in. Still makes me smile to remember it.

Sitting on a hot tube, reading and with my earphones in, a man sat next to me with his back to me. He suddenly turned around and asked if I was a student, I replied 'No' and then he gave me two peaches. That was all. I was a little confused but found it to be a very sweet moment in my life, as were the peaches!

It was rush hour and I was struggling with a heavy suitcase and two bags at Green Park station. I was so pleasantly when a gentleman offered to help and carried my case all the way up the stairs. Chivalry isn't dead... and Londoners are friendly & helpful!

I was crying on the tube and as I got off at my stop a man put his hand on my shoulder and said, 'Everything will be alright, you know,' and walked off. I suddenly felt a bit more hopeful.

Having been shopping at Hobbs on the King's Road, I cleverly left the bag on the Jubilee line at Canary Wharf. Thank you to the person who turned the bag in at West Ham - tags and all. No one could believe it, even staff! The favour was returned via a scarf left on the same line.

I would like to thank the young man who offered me his seat on a crowded train, even though he had a lot of bags to hold. I was too proud to ask for a seat but my arthritis was unbearable. So thanks to the young gentlemen for helping me to relief my pain

As I sat on the train a Father and Son (perhaps 4 years) were seated opposite me. After several minutes the little boy leant over, gestured me forward and whispered "did you know that Darth Vader is Luke's Father?!". I pretended I didn't and shared in his amazement at this revelation. We chatted for several more stops with the whole carriage listening in with quiet smiles before he politely asked "do you believe in God?"... Read more

As I sat on the train a Father and Son (perhaps 4 years) were seated opposite me. After several minutes the little boy leant over, gestured me forward and whispered "did you know that Darth Vader is Luke's Father?!". I pretended I didn't and shared in his amazement at this revelation. We chatted for several more stops with the whole carriage listening in with quiet smiles before he politely asked "do you believe in God?" needless to say Dad was a little embarrassed.

When I had a corneal ulcer, and could hardly see at all, I tried to take the Northern line to Warren St. A young woman helped me: she was diabetic, and a lawyer, and said she knew what it was to have health problems. She got off her train, helped me to street level, and would have taken me to the bus stop, but I told her not to as she would have to pay again to continue her journey. I would love her to know how grateful I was....

A lady coming through the station, on her way back to South Africa, lost her passport and about £1,000 in traveller's cheques. She asked staff at another station to ring around to see if it had been found. Luckily we had it. She came back to collect them. When they returned from their trip, her child had made a card for us that said "You're my hero".

I once had to get across London with a sprained wrist and a suitcase. One station had no escalators. Two complete strangers, to each other as well as me, picked up the suitcase, took it down the stairs and got me onto the train. They dashed to get off the train before I could thank them - their train was on the other platform.

A Sliding Doors moment. I saw the most beautiful girl on a crowded commuter train and she got off at the same station as me, Holborn. In the carriage I'd been reading a biography of Chekhov and had just read the words "whatever you would do, do it, for in boldness are magic and genius". I knew I'd forever regret it if I didn't speak to her and finally plucked up the courage on the escalator. In her kindness she replied. Six months... Read more

A Sliding Doors moment. I saw the most beautiful girl on a crowded commuter train and she got off at the same station as me, Holborn. In the carriage I'd been reading a biography of Chekhov and had just read the words "whatever you would do, do it, for in boldness are magic and genius". I knew I'd forever regret it if I didn't speak to her and finally plucked up the courage on the escalator. In her kindness she replied. Six months later we got married. We've now been married for 14 years and have 4 children.

I was running for the bus on my first day of work, and I was only 19 so it was my first ever real job. The bus driver must have seen me, but I was too late and the bus past. Another bus, who was about to start his shift opened the doors of his bus- I explained I'd been running for the other bus not his. He said, "I know, but hop on, we'll chase the other bus". I got on, stood next to the driver and we drove down the road, quite... Read more

I was running for the bus on my first day of work, and I was only 19 so it was my first ever real job. The bus driver must have seen me, but I was too late and the bus past. Another bus, who was about to start his shift opened the doors of his bus- I explained I'd been running for the other bus not his. He said, "I know, but hop on, we'll chase the other bus". I got on, stood next to the driver and we drove down the road, quite quickly trying to catch up with the other bus. Of course the driver had to stop and pick up other people, so I never made it, but it was the kindest thing that he could have done. It really made my day and I managed to get to my job on time, in a very good mood, inspired by the generoisty of a stranger.

A girl in her 20s gets on the Tube and sits down, bursting into tears. The woman next to her gets out her packet of tissues and gives her one. When the train arrives at the woman's stop, she puts a hand on the girl's shoulder and they smile at each other - unspoken compassion and gratitude.

King's Cross Tube: a man coming up the escalator, masses of luggage in black bin liners. At the top, his bags split, saucepans etc rolling noisily all over. We helped pick them up, but he couldn't manage alone. We gave him bags, and I ran for a trolley, walked him to the main station, found his train, helped load his luggage, asked someone to tell him where to get off, and wished him luck. He was from Senegal and looked lost, anxious and... Read more

King's Cross Tube: a man coming up the escalator, masses of luggage in black bin liners. At the top, his bags split, saucepans etc rolling noisily all over. We helped pick them up, but he couldn't manage alone. We gave him bags, and I ran for a trolley, walked him to the main station, found his train, helped load his luggage, asked someone to tell him where to get off, and wished him luck. He was from Senegal and looked lost, anxious and alone. i wanted to make him feel welcome here.

I was visiting London, which was my first time in a city, and went to a festival and subsequently lost all my friends. After the festival ended I waited at the station but they didn't show. The station was packed and I didn't know how to get home or even where I was. A young drunk guy rushing past stopped and helped me get home. That wasn't the last time I relied on a stranger for help. You're good people, you Londoners.

I'd had a c-section a couple of days before. Our son was in intensive care but I had been discharged from hospital so I had to travel to see him. Instead of spending more money on taxis, we decided to take the Piccadilly Line. The train was crowded. A woman dressed in nice boots, glittery eyeshadow and red glasses gave up her seat for me, even though no-one could have known what I was going through. I'd like to say thank you.

I was coming up the escalator at Victoria. There was a blind lady and her guide dog at the top; the guide dog was struggling with the escalator and didn't want to set his paw on it. Two Underground staff appeared, one took the blind lady by the hand and led her down the escalator while the other gently picked up the Labrador and carried him down, all the way talking to him and stroking him. I melted.

When the man in the seat next to me started snoring, I smiled to myself. A couple of people opposite me smiled back. It felt good to share a bit of warmth.

I was in London for the first time. I clutched my red luggage and a creased address and no English knowledge at all. On the Tube, a girl was carrying a dog in her arms, it was staring at me frightened: it also did not understand. The girl caught me looking painfully at her dog: her smile my first understanding.

While walking between the Victoria Line and Central Line I heard a fella playing the clarinet; he looked hard done by. Passing by was an elderly gentleman, who from his appearance didn't seem to have better luck in life. This man stopped and took out a small purse of pennies. He took his time and counted a few up and placed them in the clarinet case. It was beautiful to see generosity, even from those who are struggling.

I find that I often observe or participate in small acts of kindness on the tube (central line mostly), usually things like helping an old lady down stairs, giving up my seat to someone who needs it more than I do or helping carry a pushchair for example. However sometimes an act of kindness can be a little more unusual - a couple of months ago I was travelling on the tube when a girl got on and sat opposite me, fished a pretty, but horribly... Read more

I find that I often observe or participate in small acts of kindness on the tube (central line mostly), usually things like helping an old lady down stairs, giving up my seat to someone who needs it more than I do or helping carry a pushchair for example. However sometimes an act of kindness can be a little more unusual - a couple of months ago I was travelling on the tube when a girl got on and sat opposite me, fished a pretty, but horribly broken string of beads out of her bag, and proceeded to attempt to mend it. I watched her for a few minutes trying in vain to put these beads back together then offered to try to mend the necklace for her, as although I had no tools with me, I thought I may be a little more successful - I'm a jewellery designer by profession and it just seemed like it was one of those fated moments! I managed to put her pretty necklace back together just as the doors opened on my stop! It was a nice thing to do; she was delighted that her necklace was again wearable and I was happy that I'd been able to help... I think it's karma - do good things and good things happen!

While my girlfriend was coming home from work through a packed Bank station, she noticed a middle-aged man kneeling down and sobbing to himself. People were storming past him as if he didn't exist. Instead of walking-on, she started talking to him and it turned out his estranged father had just died. She sat there and consoled him while he told her his life story. After a while he calmed down, she managed to get a smile out of him and she... Read more

While my girlfriend was coming home from work through a packed Bank station, she noticed a middle-aged man kneeling down and sobbing to himself. People were storming past him as if he didn't exist. Instead of walking-on, she started talking to him and it turned out his estranged father had just died. She sat there and consoled him while he told her his life story. After a while he calmed down, she managed to get a smile out of him and she went upstairs with him and put him in a cab.

A Japanese man was sitting opposite me on the Central Line making something in paper - I was totally transfixed - forget all manners and was just staring at what he was creating in front of me. It was a unicorn, we had a brief chat and then he gave me it. I still have it and keep it in a cabinet

I witnessed someone helping a blind man get a seat this evening - no easy feat in the rush hour

While travelling on the District line I witnessed a young child in a very distressed state because he needed to to do a wee. Kindly one of the other passengers passed over his near empty water bottle and much to his mother's relief, and some other passengers shock, he was able to relieve himself.

The stiff breeze on the Underground platform floated my summer straw hat off my head and on to the track. I had had it for many years and was fond of it. Assuming I'd lost it forever, I decided to ask the staff anyway, if there was any way to retrieve it safely - even if there was, I supposed a train would probably come along and finish it off. To my amazement, and delight, a charming station employee brought a "grabber stick" and... Read more

The stiff breeze on the Underground platform floated my summer straw hat off my head and on to the track. I had had it for many years and was fond of it. Assuming I'd lost it forever, I decided to ask the staff anyway, if there was any way to retrieve it safely - even if there was, I supposed a train would probably come along and finish it off. To my amazement, and delight, a charming station employee brought a "grabber stick" and lay full length on the platform (luckily, still no trains!) and got it back for me - I felt quite foolish, but he was cheerful and willing to help. I felt good all day, and still do when I think of it. Thanks to that kind person, and to Michael Landy for reminding me.

Riding the Jubilee line home, a tired looking business man sat next to me. Within minutes he was asleep. And seconds later his head was on my shoulder. I was only on the tube for 4 stops, but I thought those might just be the 40 winks he needs, so I let him stay, and shared a smile with the rest of the carriage

I inadvertently left an expensive Pentax camera on the Tube from Fulham Broadway to South Kensington, realising I'd lost this whilst walking through Knightsbridge. I resigned myself to never seeing my camera or the more important photographs again, but registered this as a lost item on the TfL website anyway. Less than a week later, I received an email letting me know that my camera had been handed in. I never had the opportunity to thank the... Read more

I inadvertently left an expensive Pentax camera on the Tube from Fulham Broadway to South Kensington, realising I'd lost this whilst walking through Knightsbridge. I resigned myself to never seeing my camera or the more important photographs again, but registered this as a lost item on the TfL website anyway. Less than a week later, I received an email letting me know that my camera had been handed in. I never had the opportunity to thank the kind person who took the returned my camera to me, exactly as I'd lost it. So, kind person, if you are reading this - thank you!

I was commuting to work when a man stood near me and started grinning madly. This being London at rush hour I tried to ignore him, until he pulled from his bag the same book as I was reading - Rupert Everett's autobiography. We shared a long and funny chat about where we'd got to, what he was up to etc, which made the journey much more fun. I no longer ignore happy strangers...

I'm from Portugal and I arrived to London for the first time in my life. I was carrying a luggage with over 25kg by myself, unfortunatelly the two handles had broken, and i couldn't carry the luggage with my hands. So, between Victoria Station and Leyton Middle Road Station, I was blessed by four guys that help me with my luggage. What a great experience of kindness, God bless you all!

I was on the Central line on my way home, and I sat next to a lovely guy who kept getting up to offer his seats to those who needed it most, when I got to my stop I gave him a note which said 'You're a lovely guy, I hope you have a nice day' and he had the biggest grin after reading the note

I had just moved to England, 4 years ago and I was still trying to find a job, going to interviews daily, changing trains and tubes 3-4 times every time. Over the weekend I decided to visit my cousin and prepared a small bag to take with me which under all that pressure, I forgot on the train! After a few days I got an email saying that my bag was found and handed over the the x-station which I can't remember now. When I contacted the station... Read more

I had just moved to England, 4 years ago and I was still trying to find a job, going to interviews daily, changing trains and tubes 3-4 times every time. Over the weekend I decided to visit my cousin and prepared a small bag to take with me which under all that pressure, I forgot on the train! After a few days I got an email saying that my bag was found and handed over the the x-station which I can't remember now. When I contacted the station no-one seemed to know anything about my bag. i spent a couple of months trying to track down the bag and i couldn't, so i decided to email back , thinking it was someone from the station who had contacted me. I was stunned when they replied saying that there were only traveling with me and saw the bag and handed it to Victoria station. I had my email on the bag and they thought to email me letting me know that the bag was found! I went to Victoria station and found it, I was so thrilled and grateful, back home my bag would have been disappeared in a second!

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This page gives a selection of stories that passengers and staff have given Michael Landy. Each person has described an act of kindness they have seen or been part of on the Tube. Landy will select some of these stories to be placed in stations and trains. To find out more, visit About the project.

To read a story, click on a red figure. Or read the growing list of stories below, with the newest at the top.

If you’d like to take part by sending in your story, visit the Send a Story page.

  • I was rushing to switch from Central to Victoria when I dropped my phone. Finding it was mission impossible in the rush hour crowd. Then someone tapped my shoulder and with 'here you go' handed it back to me. All happened so fast I managed to mutter a thank youbut didn't even glimpse the face of my kind stranger.

  • I once had to get across London with a sprained wrist and a suitcase. One station had no escalators. Two complete strangers, to each other as well as me, picked up the suitcase, took it down the stairs and got me onto the train. They dashed to get off the train before I could thank them - their train was on the other platform.

  • It was a very windy, rainy day and i was in the bus at a bus stop. I saw a women with a child in her arms and was very wet. I thought it would be cold so i got off the bus and gave them a towel i had because i was planning to go swimming. They dried off and was smiling :)

  • At the age of 87 her pace became slower... so l made my pace slow to.. to be patient and walk on her level to.. be gentle and kind to your mother people...

  • One day I saw a girl (about 10) who was travelling down an escalator in the train station. She was busy talking to her mother and when she got to the bottom her undone laces started to go underground with the escalator steps! She started getting all panicky and screamed until a kind businessman behind her who was carry quite a few loose papers bent down to free her, but as he did so he dropped some of his papers and they disappeared underground before he could do anything.

  • (Spending a few months outside the UK!) I've been offered seats, people has moved to allow two of us sit together, and they've helped me with my luggage, but my favourite part is trying to give back. When leaving London I always go to Liverpool St station to take the train but I first go the subway station and look for someone about to buy a daypass and pass mine on. They often offer money, but the good feeling as the smile spreads on their faces is worth a thousand times more.

  • I looked up catching her eye. I then swiftly looked up again as though riveted by the nonexistent advertisement above her. My eye then dropped to the ground. "Does she like me?" I braved yet another glance. Our eyes kissed. She added a warm smile. My heart thumped. I looked down. Deep contemplation. "Think." I looked up. An empty seat.

  • The morning after giving blood, I fainted on the Piccadilly line on my way into work. Fellow passengers gave up their seats, helped me up the escalators (where I fainted again!) and one - forever known as Tube Hero - even popped out to get me some water and call my office to let them know I'd be late in.

  • During winter, I needed to get to Heathrow in the morning rush hour. I was carrying a large, heavy suitcase and people kept pushing past me into the carriages which were busier than normal due to snow delays. One kind lady noticed my distress and stood in front of the crowd, blocking the entrance while ushering me into the carriage. She even missed the train herself as there was no space! Thank you, so much.

  • I was travelling home on the Central Line one evening feeling exhausted and grumpy after a bad day when I felt a hand grasp mine. A little girl sitting in a pushchair opposite me had decided she wanted to hold my hand. She hung on to it for six stops, causing everyone in the carriage to smile at her and me, including her mother. A lovely, spontaneous gesture I've never forgotten.

  • Despite my unfortunate life with people I still like to help. About 6 months ago two older guys got on, one fell and I went to help him up and some first aid help. His friend said he had fallen for me! He said he knew I was from Liverpool as beautiful and friendly.

  • One rainy evening, I stood in a crowded train, crying after someone I thought would be my first and only love. I didn't care that everyone could see me, I never occurred to me really. Few stops later, a guy got off the train but handed me a piece of paper before he did so. Inside, was a drawing of a duck saying 'smile'. On the platform, he bent down to tie his shoelaces and looked up at me. I never stopped crying but smiled for him. The drawing is still on my wall. He gave me something that the most dearest can't give sometimes. He gave me hope. . ...

  • I was 7 months pregnant and, after a long day at work, was trying to get on the packed Overground line at Homerton. The guard (Enait) stepped out and invited me into the empty driver's cab at the back of the train. We chatted until Canonbury. I was warmed by his kindness but super excited to sit in the driver's seat. I told my friends I drove the train!

  • We both got on the Piccadilly line this morning and out of the blue you said to me  "you look absolutely gorgeous this morning", just wanted to say thanks for brightening up my dull Monday morning :)

  • On a platform, that got busier until it was rammed, sat a man who looked down on his luck. When the train pulled in a couple of us held the crowd back to allow him to get to the train on his crutches. The seated suited people sunk behind their papers, carefully ignoring us. I asked for someone to give up their seat and a lady did. The guy sat down gratefully with a conspiratorial grin to us who'd created a path. As we moved off the scent of how hard life can be when you're down on your luck reached the people who had stubbornly stuck to their seats first.

  • "Can any medical staff please come to the manager's office" was repeatedly announced at Tooting Bec. As a psychiatric nurse I hesitated, how much use would I be? In the office the manager looked like a rabbit in headlights with a woman who puffed that she was giving birth. I calmed the woman and took details, whilst the manager liaised with ambulance control. The woman confirmed that she had other conditions relevant to the situation (and that a psychiatric nurse was exactly the right person). Being part of the station team was an honour. Safety first and offering an ill person care and dignity second.

  • I was suddenly having a terrible nose bleed in the middle of a busy Tube. Blood was dripping down my face, and I was extremely embarrassed. The women next to me noticed and immediately started searching her bag and pulled out a bunch of tissues. This helped me stop my nose bleed and get to work on time. Thank you so incredibly much! In the past I may have been selfish - I will change after today...

  • I was 7 months pregnant during a hot summer, squeezed onto an exceptionally busy Tube train as the Victoria line was down. Every elbow seemed to point at my baby belly, I was faint through lack of air, but there was space further down the carriage. I called out, 'I'm pregnant, can you let me through to where there's some space?' The people parted like the Red Sea, hands reached out to me, four people offered me a seat and water even though I explained I'd only wanted some space.

  • I was sitting in the Tube and there were two seats available with one person sitting between them. Two people who were talking to each other sat on those seats and the person noticing they were together smiled and moved to allow them to sit together.

  • I once found a very drunk lady in seating and almost falling from a bench in a Tube station and decided to help her to get home. She could barely walk or talk. She had lots of money in her posh purse but no English money at all! Luckily she lived nearby (in Bayswater!) and the taxi wasn't expensive. I felt like I was her angel that night.

  • One evening, at around 11 o'clock, I was travelling home on the Jubilee line after having broken up with my boyfriend of over a year. After having spent the start of the journey in tears, I was now trying to hold them back in an almost empty carriage. A middle-aged man, sat opposite me, in a business suit asked me if I was ok and why I was so upset. I've forgotten the details, but he told me a story to cheer me up and said everything would be alright. He then chatted to me until my stop and wished me home safely. I haven't seen him since but he stopped my tears and I've never forgotten him.

  • My faith in humanity was restored this morning after I left one of my mittens on the train and a man got off and ran after me to return it. When I asked if he had got off the train for me he shrugged and said he'd get the next one. He put a smile on my face all day!It's good to know there's still some nice people out there.

  • I was bringing my 6-yr old daughter back from a day out and we changed trains at Bank station for the Central line. When our train came in, I picked up my daughter as she was scared of stepping over the Gap, put one foot on the carriage floor but couldn't go any further as no-one moved up to let us in. Neither could I go backwards as now I was straddling the Gap, with one foot on the train and one on the platform! I was just wondering what on earth would happen when the doors tried to close when a lady saw my dilemma and made everyone move up, then she pulled me onto the train. She offered me a seat as well but I was happy just to stand. I'm still wary of using Bank station now though.

  • I was really in a difficult situation, when i was going to my work, I received a call from my college they wanted me to send them an email immediately before I was entering to the Tube station and I was getting late for my work as well and was worried what to do. I saw a leaflet that says you can connect WI-FI in underground stations then I connect my mobile with the Tube WI-FI and I was saved. :)

  • It's the 8th of July 2005, the day after the 7/7 bombings. Parts of the Underground are still running, but it's strangely quiet. As we get off the Tube we pass a busker, singing along to 'Imagine' on the guitar. The sign in his guitar case says "I don't want any money today, thought we all needed cheering up".

  • I gave a woman £1.50 to top up her Oyster, because she didn't have enough. I didn't expect anything in return, but a couple of days later she brought me a card, and the money. I still have the card in my drawer. If the person's genuine, and I have money in my pocket, I don't mind.

  • A few weeks ago a guy got off a Hammersmith and City train at Mile End, but his sister stayed on the train. She was about 55 years old, visiting from Bangladesh, she didn't speak good English. He was panicking. She had a flight to catch the next day. He was going to get blamed by his niece. I tracked the train using trackernet. I called line control, the British Transport Police, I called Aldgate East Station, and Whitechapel Station, I got a blanket announcement out across the whole line. I suggested he went to Whitechapel to find her, but he came back crying, because he couldn't find her. His wife was at Plaistow, his niece was at Hammersmith, and he decided to go to every station looking for her. Eventually Whitechapel station called - they had found her. The man was so grateful that I'd helped him.

  • It was evening, about 6.30. I was working on the gate at Gants Hill and a regular customer came through. 'They're keeping you busy,' he said. I told him I hadn't even had time for my meal break, and he said 'What do you want, I'll go and buy it for you!'

  • I used to be a revenue inspector. I was at London Bridge and caught a guy without a ticket. I talked to him - he said he hadn't had a job in two years. He was on his way to his first interview in all that time, and didn't have any money. I reported him for fare evasion, I had to - that's my job. But when he came back through the station after his interview, I chatted to him about how it had gone, and then just bought him a ticket to get him home. There's doing your job, and then there's the human side of it as well.

  • I got the after effects of an act of kindness by my colleague. There's a guy, who still comes through here - he lives out in Essex and drives in every day to get the train. He forgot his Oyster. It was on a Monday, and didn't have money on him. My colleague lent him enough cash for a travel card, so eight or nine quid, he'd have been stuck otherwise. He came in the next day with a box of sweets and the money, and asked me to pass them on.

  • A couple of months ago I was on night duty. Just as the last trains were coming in I felt really, really sick all of a sudden. I called a colleague and she told me to ring the line controller so I could go home. But I thought, no, I'll make an effort, so I went up to the platform to see the last trains out. A train operator got off the train. I'd seen him before, but didn't know him well. I must have looked bad, because he came over and asked if I was okay. I said no, actually, I feel really weak. Don't worry about it, he said, I'll help you out. He helped me see all the passengers off the train, and check the platforms, and then he came downstairs with me and locked up for me. To tell you the truth, I'm not sure I could have done that on my own. The people I work with are very kind. It was in the log book that I was ill, and I got so many phone calls to check I was okay. That gives you a real sense of belonging.

  • I had someone who'd fallen ill once. She wanted some water. Another customer went and bought some water with his own money. Then she said she wanted chocolate! I thought she was taking it a bit far, but he went and bought her a bar of chocolate too.

  • We see kindness everyday at Greenford Station. There's no escalator down, only stairs, so you always see ladies with pushchairs, and gentlemen helping them down.

  • We've got a driver who always turns up an our early for every shift, and the first words out of his mouth are 'is there anything I can do to help out?'

  • We had a driver a while back who had a dog on the track. He stopped his train in the tunnel, went into the carriage and got a bit of cake from one of the passengers. He went down and coaxed the dog off the track and into the carriage, then took it to the next station to be picked up.

  • Steve, one of our drivers, is involved with a charity called Haven House - a hospice for terminally ill children; he raises quite a lot of money for them.

  • Andy, a driver here, is involved in World Vision's Sponsor a Child scheme. We sponsor a child as a depot every year - so that's an act of kindness as a depot, that's spearheaded by Andy.

  • When we had all the snow the other month, a few of us drivers got snowed in on the east of the line, from Barkingside. We couldn't move. A couple of other drivers volunteered to come and pick us up. This was about 3am and it was like a skating rink out there - if they hadn't done that we'd have had to try and walk home through feet of snow.

  • You get people say thank you when you get off at Ealing - they say 'were you the driver of that train? Thank you.'

  • This week we had a driver who had a one-under. Another driver , who's part of the trauma support group, went straight out to him. The support group's all manned by volunteers.

  • We have drivers on what we call 'spare' shifts, so we have cover in case of absences or emergencies. There are a couple of drivers here who'll always volunteer for extra work, so another driver can go and have a cup of tea. I think that's kind, they don't need to do that.

  • Each depot has a trauma support team - a group of volunteer drivers who are on call when they're not working. They're there for when something goes wrong, for instance if someone jumps in front of a train. They're usually one of the first people on the scene. They're there to move the train if needs be, or make the driver a cup of tea, or drive them home, or just be there for them.

  • It was New Year's Eve and there was a guy on the station in just his trousers hollering and shouting. It turned out he was a soldier and had been in Afghanistan. His friends had all died, and it had really affected him. He had their names tattooed on his back. I just put him in my car and drove him home.

  • We once got a homeless man off one of the last trains. It was about one o'clock in the morning, in the middle of winter. He was standing there with bare feet, so I went into the office, got some boots I had and gave them to him. There was a woman outside of the station who was waiting for a taxi. She had these long pink socks on and she took them off and gave them to him too.

  • A good few years ago, when I had a house, I was in arrears. A colleague of mine and his missus came round and lent me £6,000. I didn't manage to keep the house, but I've been paying them back £250 a month I've got one payment left. He still looks after my finances now, because I'm useless at them. I'm forever indebted to him.

  • Especially at this station, I offer to help people with their suitcases and buggies up the stairs. They don't always want it, but they appreciate the offer.

  • Sometimes, if people are short of 10p or so, I'll give them 10p. I always say to them, 'when you meet someone in the same boat do the same for them.'

  • There was a woman who used to be a regular traveller through here. She lost her job and she's been unemployed for two years now. Whenever a job comes up here I tell her about them.

  • A few weeks ago, I found a Oyster card wallet in the station. I wrote up they guy's name on the whiteboard asking him to see the supervisor. He came back and saw us and we returned it to him. He'd already cancelled the card, but he had some business cards in the wallet which was leather and quite nice. He was happy as a clown to get it back.

  • We get a lot of school kids through here. One day a kid came and said I don't have any money, can I go through? You think - oh, really, another one? But I put a couple of pounds on his card and let him through. A week or so later a woman came up to me and said are you Maureen? I said, yes. She said, you put money on my son's card and let him travel - here's the money back, thank you. It's not the money, it's that she came back to say thank you.

  • We have a lot of regular passengers here, who are great. Our part time SA moved stations to work at Loughton and she got showered with gifts when she  - flowers and chocolates - because she's such a lovely person.

  • I had a woman turn up with a severely disabled boy, who loved trains. She just wanted to go one stop and then back again, but he was in a wheelchair and we have limited step free access. I sorted her out with a free one day pass so she could go to Epping, stay on the train, come back to Woodford and change platforms through the underpass to come back. She wrote in to say thank you.

  • It's our job to help customers on the station. One day I was at Snaresbrook on the late shift. This lady was very drunk. I noticed her wobbling about on the stairs. She wasn't really aware of what she was doing. I rushed out to the stairs and helped her out of the station. Later on I discovered she had dropped a purse and some keys - car keys and house keys. She came back the next day and they were given to her. She didn't even know where she'd lost them! She left me a lovely note, saying 'thank you to the lovely lady who helped me yesterday'. I really appreciated it.

  • One evening during Peak, a woman was crossing the footbridge and her keys fell down the side of the wall. Me and the newsman said we'd do what we could. We found a chair, and I climbed over the wall. I searched around with a torch and finally saw a glint in the undergrowth from her keys. I came into work a couple of days later and she brought in a thank you card and a box of chocolates. It's nice when people say thank you in person, you know they mean it.

  • A couple of years back, a young lady had a problem with her Oyster at Bond Street. She'd waited until 7pm to touch in but she'd been charged the higher rate. When she got here the ticket office was shut so I couldn't do anything about it. I told her to ring the help people to sort it out and gave her the number. A couple of days later she came through and said thank you and she was really grateful for my help.

  • The other week we had a report during morning peak that there was a cat on the platform, and the passenger was worried it would jump onto the track. One of my colleagues put it through the fence into some open gardens, but it kept coming back. The next day a customer brought in some cat food for it! We've had people coming in saying they want to adopt it.

  • We have a VIP (visually impaired person) who comes here from Shepherd's Bush or White City. They put him on the train and call us to tell us which carriage he's in. He works a bus ride away from this station, so one of our staff meets him and I get them to walk him to the bus stop - which is about 5 minutes away - and wait with him until his bus comes. There are 5 or 6 different buses stop there and I wouldn't want him to get on the wrong one.

  • It was midnight. I went to do my station checks, and when I got to the bridge I saw a girl collapsed on the stairs, face down. I didn't know what to do. Another girl was coming and I asked her to stay as a witness for me. I tried to take the girl's pulse but I couldn't find it. I tried to check her breathing. She was really pale, and it was winter. I thought she was dead and I had a real feeling of dread. I took my jacket off and put it under her face, and then I called an ambulance and the line controller. Eventually I saw she was breathing, and the ambulance came. I think she was just really drunk.

  • A few weeks back there was a person ill on a train. I went to help this lady. She said she felt sick and couldn't stand up. I helped her out of the train and was sick on me, but I didn't let go of her! She collapsed on the platform. I stayed with her for 15 minutes, got her some water and waited for the ambulance to come.

  • The other week someone handed in a woman's black handbag. I couldn't find a mobile or driving licence or anything. I eventually found her Oyster card and saw she travelled from here to Woodford, so I called Woodford and eventually she asked there.

  • There's a guide dog training school near here. They come down to the station to train the dogs on the platform a couple of times a week. We open the gates for them. They ask us not to talk to the dogs because they're working, so we don't. We all enjoy them being here.

  • There was an elderly man last week who'd lost his shopping on the train. He left his phone number with me. I did my best to find it, and eventually tracked it down. I called him at home and he came to collect it. The best thing about it was that he wrote a lovely letter to London Underground Head Offices at 55 Broadway about what I'd done for him, and I got a commendation.

  • When I was at West Ham, there was a young man, about 19 who was extremely drunk, confused, dazed and bemused and he didn't know which way was up or down. A lot of the time, when you've been dealing with drunks a lot, you get a bit hands off, but my colleague Chris wasn't like that, he dealt with everyone individually. He talked to this boy, got his mobile phone, worked out who his parents were and called them to come and pick him up. He was that kind of character, Chris, he didn't develop that cynical edge.

  • The cleaners down at Epping are good people. About 2 weeks before Christmas a couple of years ago we had a load of snow. I was in charge of Epping that week. I'd get to the station at 6 in the morning and the platform was thick with snow. Every day for a period of at least 3.5-4 hours the cleaners helped me clear those platforms of snow. I didn't ask them to do it, they volunteered, they were really pro-active about it.

  • To me it's all in a day's work. It all ends up in the mixer. I see good things and bad things. Nice things? I'd been on the job 2 weeks and I gave half my dinner to a colleague. She didn't have any lunch so I gave her half of mine.

  • There was a young lady once who was ill. I got her into the office, and let her stay there with me for half an hour or so, until she felt well enough to go.

  • Last summer when I was at Latimer Road, there was a chap there who was steaming drunk. He'd been out in Central London, and somehow ended up at Latimer Road. He lived somewhere out past Watford Junction. He had no idea where he was, all I could get out of him was how scared he was. I helped him sort himself out. I had to call at least 3 taxi companies before I could find one who'd take him. He never came back to say thank you!

  • We used to stable the last trains at night. The amount of times we've helped out drunk people and got them down the stairs, into the cab office, called their wives, given them water or tea, sorted them out.

  • There's a woman who's a regular here who always brings us tins of sweets at Christmas, every year, without fail. She doesn't have to do that.

  • There was a passenger who'd tried to top up her Oyster for zones 1 to 4, except she didn't validate her card, so the £50 came back out. Another passenger came and handed it in to us.

  • I had a drunk guy once, he was in a bad state. He'd come off the train late, and ended up on the wrong platform, he was a bit worse for wear. He got himself out of the station, fell over and bashed his head. I'd just done a refresher on the first aid course as London Underground offer that, which is great. So I went out, put him in the recovery position, and called the ambulance. It was Halloween I think, and the clocks had gone back that night, so people were out partying later, which meant the ambulance teams were more stretched than usual. They said thank you, you didn't need to do all that.

  • The other week there was a young lad with a 16+ Oyster card who was stranded here with no coins. A woman went over and topped up his card with £5; she didn't know him or anything.

  • There was a German couple who came in here and realised they'd left their knapsack on the bus, with their passports and everything in it. I rushed outside with them, and when another bus came along I explained what had happened to the driver. He radioed their control room. The guy there radioed the other bus and stopped it straight away. They found the knapsack and I put the couple on the bus to go and pick it up. They went and picked it up and then came back here, this was all in about 45 minutes. You could see their relief.

  • When I was stationed at Neasden, I remember a woman coming through the station. I noticed she had a problem with her foot, so I helped her, and let her through the wide-aisle gate. She came through regularly for about a month and a half. We used to talk; I'd ask after her, how her leg was doing, how physio was going. Then I didn't see her for a while. But that Christmas time she turned up out of the blue and asked for me. She gave me a Christmas card that said 'to my man at Neasden', and she put a ten pound note inside. I thought that was very kind.

  • We help out a lot with lost property. There was one lady in particular, who came through one evening, quite late. She was a doctor. She'd left her laptop on the train. It had all her information for her operations. We rang round the stations, and it was found further down the line. She was so grateful, she wrote to the GSM to commend me and my colleague, and she wrote to Boris Johnson too. We both got a 'thanks to you' award for that.

  • I was traveling to Stratford one day. There was a lady with a buggy who wanted to get up the stairs. Nobody was helping her, they were just walking past. I said 'would you like a hand?' She said, 'Yes, please, I've been waiting here for five minutes.' It didn't take two seconds, and she was so grateful.

  • Most of the stations in this group have lots of stairs. I can't stand and watch people struggle up so I'm always helping young women with their buggies, and older people too.

  • Many times I sit on the train and I see someone older than me and think: they can't stand, I can stand better than them, so I give them my seat. And then sometimes children or younger people give up their seat for me and I always really appreciate that.

  • When people lose things you can really feel empathy for them, you think how you wouldn't want it to happen to you. I remember a time when a customer lost a set of car keys. If you think how big a train is and how small a set of car keys is, you could say it's like looking for a needle in a haystack. I used the Connect Radio to talk to the whole group, and it turned out another customer had handed them in at another station. The woman who'd lost the keys was absolutely overawed by how well it had gone. It made me feel better and reminded me it is worth going that extra mile. I had a bit of a glow for a day or so.

  • When we locked up the station on Christmas Eve last year, I drove two of my staff members home all the way back to Ealing and Heston.

  • It was the first shift of the day, I was on the gate line, the escalator wasn't working so people were walking down. I heard a scream. It was busy and noisy, but I thought, that doesn't sound right. So I ran over and there was a woman sitting on the stairs in an awkward position, all dressed ready for work. She said she'd fallen over, I could see that her leg was all swollen. We instantly called an ambulance. She didn't want to stay there on the stairs, which was understandable. We got her into a chair and wheeled her into the control room to wait for the emergency services, and I did my best to calm her.

  • There's everyday kindness. We try and help people get to where they're going, particularly if people look lost, which they often do at this station. If people want to know something we'll do our best to help, if it's possible to find out the information they want and we have the time.

  • We get lots of tourists here - customers who really don't know what to do, or how the system works. When you just take the time to explain, when you make things really simple for them, they're so grateful.

  • Me and family visit London every half term at this time of year and have seen many Acts of Kindness and enjoy using the Underground. It is reasuring to know that there are those who will always help in times of need, thank you all.

  • Having recently lost my job, I was on the London Underground this morning and bumped into Ben, an old friend who left the company last year. I asked how he was doing and he did likewise while travelling in a packed compartment between King's Cross and Piccadilly Circus. After relating our respective approaches to getting our lives back on track, a lady standing next to us said as she left the train: "You are both wonderful people and it has been a pleasure listening to you talk to each other. I'm sure you will both do really well. I am sure of it." Totally unprompted and genuine. Makes you feel humble that there are such good people in the world.

  • As I sat on the train a Father and Son (perhaps 4 years) were seated opposite me. After several minutes the little boy leant over, gestured me forward and whispered "did you know that Darth Vader is Luke's Father?!". I pretended I didn't and shared in his amazement at this revelation. We chatted for several more stops with the whole carriage listening in with quiet smiles before he politely asked "do you believe in God?" needless to say Dad was a little embarrassed.

  • I had just broken up with my boyfriend and was making the hour long journey home from work. Having managed to hold composure for most of the journey I began crying, face covered, head down amd bright red. I could feel most of the carriage staring so I kept my face covered until I felt a hand on my shoulder - a woman and her elderly mother had come to sit in the empty seats next to me and her mother handed me a packet of tissues. The woman said that she wasn't going to ask me what happened, but that she hoped I found happiness again and that she would be thinking of me that night. She was a ray of sunshine on a very dark day!

  • Today we travelled on the Tube for the first time with our little 'uns - Rebecca 3 and Jess 23 months. We were off to the Natural History Museum to see the DINOSAURS!!!We have been touched by the numerous acts of kindness shown to us and our children - from those who helped us with our double buggy up and down the stairs, those that took the time to entertain our children with funny faces or small talk in the carriages or the man who refrained from drinking his can of the strong stuff until he stepped off of the train. You all made their day that little bit more special. Thank you from an exhausted mummy X

  • I was pregnant and travelling to work. I started to feel very hot and faint, so I got up to leave the train. The next thing I remember was waking up, lying on the floor of the carriage, surrounded by a sea of faces! They helped me up, gave me water and checked I was OK. My kind helpers were of various nationalities; they were visiting the UK on an international Scout event.

  • About a year ago, I was travelling on the Tube when I noticed an elderly gentleman sat opposite me take out something from his trouser pocket. He didn't notice but his tube ticket fell out from the same pocket onto his seat, so I kindly pointed it out to him. The gentleman looked very grateful and thanked me. A moment later he offered me a fortune cookie from the bag of Chinese food which he had sat on his lap. I opened it and the fortune inside said "You have a great sense of humour and love a good time" I laughed and read it out for him and told him that it was very accurate! I kept the fortune note to always remind me. The cookie was rather yummy too!

  • My husband and I were struggling home to Hereford from Gants Hill after spending several difficult days attending a funeral. Weather was dreadful, Tube crowded. I was feeling awful, so a big thank you to the young man who offered me his seat so promptly. Also a big sorry to everyone else for travelling with luggage during rush hour - it was unavoidable.

  • I was moving with the morning rush hour to the Tube and a young man, looking like someone you would avoid in a dark alley, stopped and started going the other way. I watched, as some others did, as this man proceeded to part the way and help an old lady down the stairs, speaking to her softly. When he had helped her, he apologised that he was late for work and had to go. It was such an amazing thing to watch.

  • I was on the way home, and was having a bit of a rough day. I had tried to maintain composure but ended up bursting into tears, to which most of the carriage ignored me. However, one man had been keeping an eye on me, and half way through my journey he handed me a pack of tissues with a smile, followed by an 'are you ok?' (Obviously this set me off more) but it was such a lovely gesture and when I got off I said thank you and wished him a good Christmas. His kindness meant my day was just that little bit better!

  • I'm a 65 year-old female, and every ski-season I struggle up and down the steps of the London Underground with an enormous heavy suitcase, stuffed with ski-boots and other gear, en route to Heathrow. And every time, the case suddenly becomes much lighter because a young man has lifted the base and is carrying it up the steps for me. So - thank you all!

  • Returning from work on the Piccadilly line, feelings of work had unusually got the better of me. I tried to hold in the pressure and sadness but tears rolled out. A lady in the same carriage approached and consoled me in the kindest way, tissues and shoulder squeeze included :) I would be pleased to tell her with appreciation today, that I listened to and followed my intuition (gut feeling) by resigning from the position soon after. I am in much better suited work now and have never looked back!

  • After a long day at work I got on the Tube so flustered that I knocked off my earring and it fell to the floor. Nearly everyone in my section of the car got down on the floor to help me find it. After several stops we were successful, and a car full of strangers felt like friends. A small thing, but the kindness was appreciated.

  • On the Jubilee line, two little brothers were eating custard creams. The older one kept taking more than the younger one wanted to share out of his tub and he started to protest. An older man opposite found them so amusing he laughingly gave the older one £5 and told him that the next time he went to a shop, he should buy some biscuits to share with his brother! Isn't that lovely!

  • I was rushing to take a train for Hunger Lane and going down the stairs to the platform I stopped a moment to check my phone when I saw a young boy saying to an old lady who had one lace of her shoe loose: sorry miss, please mind your laces. The lady eyes so expressive and she said thanks dear. I was filled with a sense of joy and fullness.

  • After a long day at work I was lucky to get a seat at the beginning of my tube journey home. After a couple of stops an elderly gentleman boarded the carriage. I immediately got up and offered him my seat to which he responded "thank you but no need, you must have had a long day at work. I however have spent most of my day sitting so quite like the change" and kindly declined the seat. He really made me smile, not for the seat itself but for his humour and words.

  • I always say, that If You made somebody smile, Your day wasn't the waste. One time I was going home from work, after having a really bad day. I couldn't stop my tears from falling. I felt so bad... But then I reached Gants Hill stop, one man looked at me, smiled and gave me thumbs up. That made my day much better... I am really grateful for that.

  • I sat on the train, I was miles away thinking of my lost daughter who had recently died. A couple sitting opposite to us cought my attention, she looked so sad. I made an excuse to talk to her and then she told me her son had just been killed in an accident and that I wouldn't understand. Well of course I did, so I held out my hand and told her I was also in same boat as her. She then started to talk to me about her loss and when we left the train, hugs were exchanged.

  • There was an American couple, on holiday from New York. They were on a budget - they didn't have much money to spare. They came into the station every morning and I just spent a bit of time with them, telling them where to go, what to do, and how to save money - just little things that you know as a Londoner, but not as a visitor: where to get a free newspaper, where to buy the cheapest coffee, that kind of thing. They came in on their last day with a souvenir mug for me, to say thank you.

  • I think that laughter is a prelude to kindness - I spend my life trying to spread kindness. I remember once there was an old man who was saddled with a lot of luggage; he was really struggling, taking one bag up at a time. I asked him is someone helping you? I asked him, is someone waiting for you at the station? He said no. I thought, he can't do this on his own. So I helped him bring his bags up to the gate line, and then up the stairs out of the station. He was so happy that someone had helped him.

  • There was an eighteen year old girl at Queensway in tears; she'd lost her friends. They were on their way to Tottenham Court Road - she'd got on the train and her friends had stayed on the platform. It turned out she was petrified of enclosed, dark spaces. She'd panicked and got off after one stop. She was terrified, and wouldn't get back on the train on her own. So I asked my manager if I could do an escort detail. I went on the train with her to Tottenham Court Road and married her up with her friends.

  • I was kind the other day. I got on the train at Watford Junction. There was a lady who was going to Victoria, she didn't speak much English. I sat with her all the way to Euston and then walked her to the Victoria line station.

  • Someone handed in £300 to the station the other day. They'd found it in the cash machine. That's kind, I think.

  • There was a woman at Waterloo who'd lost her work laptop. She found me and gave me a description of it. I told her to come back the following day and hopefully it would have been handed in. It was found and she got it back, and the next day she came along the platform looking for me. She gave me a peck on the cheek and a big box of chocolates, and said "thanks, you saved my life".

  • It was Christmas Eve and a customer I didn't know came through the station. She gave me a card that said 'Happy Holidays' on the front, and told me not to open it until I got home. When I opened it, it had a £5 note inside. I think I bought a coffee with it for me and my fiance, nothing extravagant.

  • I was on a busy Tube and a seat became available. A young man took the seat and a moment later a woman sat on his lap thinking the seat was still available. They both stood up in embarrassment. The young man then offered the woman his seat.

  • On 11/12/12 at 8.00am I was going down the steps to South Ealing station on my way to a work conference and a young woman called to me 'you look lovely! your outfit is fabulous!' thank you! I cried, you've made my day! (I'm 54!!) However, once on the Tube, out of the blue, I started to feel really ill and a kind young guy standing next to me asked if I was ok, opened a window and then when I was obviously getting worse - hyperventilating and doubled up, he gently persuaded me to get off the train, called a guard over and made sure I was ok before he carried on with his day. I was then taken care of by 2 guards and a first aider who stayed with me for 20 minutes and then made sure I had a seat on the next train before waving me goodbye. Instead of going to work (my fainting was due to exhaustion) I went straight to Euston and then on to Liverpool, my home, feeling I had been complimented and cared for all in one day....

  • I went into the gents' toilet of a large Overground station and needed to use the change machine to get through the barrier. Having done so, I was horrified to realise that I'd left my wallet on the ledge next to the machine. I needn't have worried - I turned round to face a man who handed me my wallet and was gone before I had the chance to thank him.

  • I'm short and struggle to reach the taller bars on the Tube. On one occasion, on seeing my struggle, a nearby man offered to catch me if I fell. Another man, hearing us, offered me his spot by a bar I could reach. A small act of kindness but it kept me cheery for the rest of the day.

  • I use the Central line to and from work everyday and after a long day of work from 7 in the morning to 8 at night my feet are always sore from standing all day on the wards but as a nurse's care does not end at the hospital I still offer my seat to the elderly and those not able to stand even with my sore feet and that feel good factor I get for having done something special is just so refreshing ....Cheryl ( Newly qualified Nurse)

  • I was on my way to work and I saw a blind man struggling with his bags. I saw everyone looking at him but no one helped so I went over, asked the man if he needed helped getting to his destination, he was so happy that someone was going to help him so I went 10 more stops with him, passing the station I get off for work and made sure he got off safely. I've never been so happy to help someone and he said I was the kindest person he'd ever met. Made me smile.

  • Five years ago I was at the very top of the Northern line escalator at Charing Cross Underground station. Half a pace in front of me was a woman with a child in a pushchair, and another child in front aged around four standing in front of the pushchair. As the escalator started to go down, the four year old suddenly lost his balance and started to fall. I quickly took two steps forward, reached out, and as he was falling firmly grabbed his flailing wrist and pulled him up (I used to do sport at a high level when I was younger and have perfect hand/eye co-ordination). He could never have survived the fall. His mother couldn't thank me enough afterwards. I never left my details, and the mother was too shocked to ask, but I am sure that the family still talk about the stranger who saved their son's life.

  • Young men tend to treat each other with a mixture of indifference and hostility, so it was a real surprise for me when my son Thomas was born and I used to carry him around everywhere in a sling, that I'd get into conversation with groups of teenage boys on the Tube. It seemed that the baby had defused any possible threat I might carry, and they would suddenly be happy to chat to a stranger.

  • After a 7 hour overnight bus journey I was very tired and feeling ill, lugging along a big suitcase at rush hour. Having waited for about 7 Tubes to pass me not being able to get on with the case a lovely man squeezed it onto a little gap just big enough for me to fit in too...leaving him behind to wait for the next. Thank you for your help! It was much appreciated

  • The sadness of today caught up with me on the platform. It spilled over as I leaned against the curved wall for support. Then you offered me a hug. A stranger in London! You just held me as I sobbed into your shoulder. And you talked to me and didn't run away embarassed. Thank you, your kindness allowed me to smile again. A million times thank you. And I never knew your name.

  • On a recent visit to London with my 12 year old granddaughter we were rushing to catch a train and she jumped on first. The doors closed before I could get on leaving her alone in a crowded train. A guard radioed ahead to the next station and I jumped on the next train with my heart in my boots. At the next station a very kind man was waiting with my granddaughter at the exact spot where my carriage stopped. He was another passenger and had seen my panic and looked after her until my train got there. I can't tell you how relieved and grateful I was. It was the longest 3 minutes of my life.

  • Thanks to all the nice folk - and bus driver too - on Friday nite 2Nov when I fell running for the bus near London Bridge. And REALLY sorry to the wee man* caught in the melee. I was so bumbled, jumbled, and a mite embarrassed, I neither thanked the helpful folk, nor apologised to the little one. My best gal died a while back and this was the first day I felt on top of tings (wasn't the sky blue today? she'd always say). I love London (& Londoners), I really do, and so this little drama made me go all discombobulated. So, sturdy thanks and sorry for the bad manners (cuz manners count she'd always say). * it was a wee man, yes? Maker Rick

  • On the Piccadilly line, a drunk man opposite became aggressive towards me. As he lunged forward in my direction my boyfriend stopped his fist from hurting me and two wonderful witnesses helped him by aiding him to calm the guy and by calling the police and stopping the train at the platform. I can't thank them all enough.

  • Late evening at Russell Sq Tube on my way to meet my boyfriend from work; a young woman was sat covered in sick looking embarrassed. I sat and had a chat with her and cleaned the sick from her face with my Evening Standard - we laughed at the looks she was getting - I gave her my water, helped her on her Tube and left smiling.

  • I would like to thank the young man who offered me his seat on a crowded train, even though he had a lot of bags to hold. I was too proud to ask for a seat but my arthritis was unbearable. So thanks to the young gentlemen for helping me to relief my pain

  • On November 20th 2007 I suffered a very bad asthma attack on the Tube at King's Cross. A passenger and off-duty police officer helped me get to the LU office and called for an ambulance. I returned to the station office once I was better to thank the LU staff. Unfortunately the police officer's shoulder number noted in the incident book wasn't legible so he never got his chocolates. I'm especially grateful to him because he knew exactly what to do (see asthma.org.uk).

  • I got a call at work saying that my Dad had died of a heart attack. My world felt like it had shattered around me as I tried to get home. A lovely man put his arm around me and comforted me on the Northern line all the way to Waterloo, took me to my platform, and ran to buy me a bottle of water while I got my ticket. I wish I could tell him how much his kindness meant to me.

  • A Mum was stuck at bottom of escalator at Victoria Tube station with baby in pushchair and a frightened toddler who refused to go up. People walked around them until a man, 50ish, with Mum's approval took toddler's hand, stepped on with her and talked to distract her all the way to the top. Big smile from the toddler and a sense of achievement.

  • At 06:30 I was on my way to a job interview and I lost my purse on the way to the station. I had no way of getting any money and had no way of traveling. A station guard took it upon himself to buy me a ticket. Thank you Patrick at Bow Road, I got the job!

  • I would like to thank Michael Landy and the London Transport System for an idea that will most certainly make a positive impact in the lives of others. This summer while attending the Olympics, I was inspired by the posters in the Tube. I am a middle school teacher in California. We are trying to teach our students kindness and respect. We have started a program called "Kindness Counts", modelled after Landy's project. Students submit anonymous stories about acts of kindness they have witnessed on our website rjfisher@lgusd.k12.ca.us to use on the morning announcements and posters. Too often we hear about bullying in our schools. This project is an attempt to "flip" our focus.

  • A young lady sitting on the Tube saw I was looking ill (hungover) and struggling a bit on a shaky stretch of the Northern Line. She asked if I was ok and offered me her water bottle. Thank you!

  • A woman got onto the train carrying a lot of stuff including a small dog. She sat down and seemed to clean her pet's eyes. Then I noticed the man opposite leaning forward and offering her a small strip. She had cut her finger! The man just happened to have an elastoplast and the woman was overcome with surprise and gratitude.

  • I was standing on the Tube with my friend when a woman and her little boy approached in order to get on, the boy ran over quickly and jumped on the train and before his mother had the chance to get on the doors closed. The mother began to panic and frantically tried to open the doors while my friend and I were trying to open them from the other side but the doors would not open. As we began to move I shouted to the woman to stay exactly where she was and that we would bring her little boy back. And we did.

  • My mother was helping me lug suitcases through the Underground to my new apartment, even though, thanks to an old injury, she walks with a cane. We were on our last trip and both very tired, and a stranger, who had been watching us on the Tube, offered to carry my mother's suitcase from the platform to the turnstiles, then turned back to get on the next train. I'm grateful for him and all the strangers who gave up their seats and helped my mother carry suitcases up and down stairs.

  • I was on my way back from work and my eye was watering. A lady got off and dropped a pack of tissues on my lap as she left the Tube. It had a note which said "I hope tomorrow is a better day for you".

  • Hurrying thro' the ticket barrier to catch a train, the barrier behind me closed,clamping my suitcase with a vice-like grip!The alarm sounded but no help came until a young man, coming off the train saw my plight and tried to open the barrier using his oyster card not just once... but twice.It was all to no avail, but the Act of Kindness and the connection had been offered and that was heartwarming.

  • Whilst standing on a busy Tube train on my morning commute, I felt someone tap me on the arm. I looked down to see a bespectacled Asian gentleman proffering a small scrap of paper before me. I took it from him and opened it up to find a hastily hand-written note which read "Your zip is undone". I checked and sure enough I was suffering a minor wardrobe malfunction. Thank you random man for discretely saving me from very minor embarrassment.

  • I'd been told I was having my pay cut due to ongoing health problems. Angry and upset, I couldn't stop crying as I travelled from Holborn to Liverpool Street. Going up the escalator, a woman in front turned round and asked if I was OK. I told her what had happened and she gave me tissues, patted me on the arm and told me I'd get a much better job and that would show them. I hope she's right.

  • The train was really crowded & I was feeling really nervous about my first day teaching classroom music at a primary school. A guy started talking to me about the guitar on my back and how he once tried to learn to play, then we started talking about Hackney (he was wearing an 'I love Hackney' badge) & the Olympics. A small thing, but it made me forget all about my nerves. Then when he got off, he wished me good luck on my first day, which kept me smiling.

  • I was 17 and my father had just had a very serious stroke. He had been at my aunt's house and was now in hospital which meant I had to travel on the train to get to him. I was crying hysterically with my equally shocked 15 year old brother nervously sat next to me. A lady with a couple of small children asked me what the matter was and when I told her, asked for my father's name and said a prayer for him in front of the whole carriage of people that were listening. She held my hand and gave me words of comfort. I'll always remember her kindness and comforting words.

  • An old lady with her trolley entered the train, I gave up my seat for her as she really needed a seat. When her stop came by she couldn't push her trolley to exit the train, so I quickly helped her push her trolley and helped her come exit the train, And yes when I help her the train doors closed after so I missed my train but I waited for the next train and went home knowing I made someone happy today.

  • I was on a very crowded Tube one day and a gentleman was kind enough to say to a lady passenger, would you like my seat. The lady said "about bloody time" the gentlemen quickly sat down again and said "sorry I thought you were a lady" The moral of this story is - Say Thank You when someone is kind. Wilson Cameron

  • One evening I was travelling to meet a friend, I didn't feel quite right when I left home and was feeling worse and worse as the journey went on - hot, breathless and faint. I just had to get out of the Tube and as soon as I had I sank to the ground by the wall, I had only been there a minute when a lovely lady asked if I was ok and handed me a bottle of water which was enough to get me to the other end of my journey.

  • On our way to the Paralympics it was very packed on the Tube so naturally me and my family had to stand. After about 3 stops my daughter suddenly burst out with 'I'm going to be sick'. She looked so grey I honestly thought she was going to faint. No sooner had she said this a lady stood up and offered her seat, she even apologized that she couldn't move further away to give my daughter space. Then we also got given some water and a newspaper to fan my daughter. It was just so lovely how every one tried to help.

  • As the mother of a 6-month old I have been astounded by the number of people who have offered to help me with a pram on the Underground during my maternity leave. People have given up seats for us, moved along, helped carry the pram on and off Tubes, and particularly up and down stairs. One memorable man walking up stairs towards us helped me carry the pram all the way back down before heading back up on his way. This is the only way I can say thank you to everyone who has helped me and Edward over the past six months!

  • I was on a busy Overground train wishing I was watching Andy Murray about to win Olympic gold. A man and his girlfriend were watching it on an iPhone and held it out so I could see Murray's moment of glory. We all cheered.

  • I was at Tottenham Hale Tube station and at the time the lift and escalator wasn't working so the stairs were the only option. There was a young woman with 3 kids, two of which were in a double pram trying to get down the stairs. Before I came to her at least 20 people had passed and not one offered help, most of these before men! I helped her carry the pram down the stairs (which was possibly heavier than me) and at the bottom the look of gratitude and thanks she gave me was heart-warming. She was very thankful and it just made my heart go out to her.

  • I was on my way to my first university exam, sitting on the train I was becoming increasingly nervous; when I realised I had forgotten my ID card. I jumped off the train and ran to the opposite platform, with the aim of going home to collect it. As I sat waiting for the train I began to realise that I would never make it back on time and started to cry. A lady on the platform noticed and asked me what was wrong. I explained and she advised me to go to university anyway. I took her advice, was given a paper ID, sat the exam and graduated two years later!

  • I experienced that all too familiar moment of panic when, having just got off the Tube, I realised that my purse (containing, among other vital treasures, my oyster card) was not in my bag. But a man sitting next to me on the carriage had seen I'd left it on my seat and got off just to give it to me. The doors closed before he could get back on. Though another train was due in a few minutes, I'd noticed he had been with a friend who'd stayed on board and they were separated just so he could give a careless teenager her purse back. Having been saved a lot of stress, I was touched as for a second the distance between me and a world of strangers decreased.

  • I was running late for work and as I entered the platform I noticed the next Jubilee line train from Stanmore was ready to depart. Me and this young lady sprinted for the train, however, oblivious to me my keys fell out of my pocket. While I reached the carriage, I realised the lady went back for my keys, threw them to me just before the doors closed, sacrificing her ride. I never got to properly thank the young lady for her great act of kindness.

  • I was very tired one night and while rushing for a District line train at Victoria, I tripped on the stairs. A young woman came straight over to me and helped me up in the most caring way. It was just a small gesture but made such an impact on me.

  • I was on the Central line with my Mum and a Dad in my carriage was sternly telling off his two young boys, around age 6 and 7, trying not to draw attention to himself. I asked my Mum what they'd done and a man behind me answered 'They want to take the Northern line, they think it'll be quicker' and the boys had so much self belief that it would be quicker but the Dad wasn't having any of it. We, and a few others that heard, could not stop giggling.

  • It was the Jubilee weekend and I was on the Tube on my own sat next to two French girls and opposite two Italian girls when an Australian couple joined the carriage. The friendly Australian man complimented the Italian girls on their smiles and after looking round complimented myself and the French girls, explaining he was a dentist and knew a good smile when he saw one. Eventually we all left the Tube with the promise to 'Keep smiling'. In conclusion, a smile means the same in every language and culture and costs nothing.

  • On Friday 10th Aug travelling to Olympics in Hyde Park, my son found his mobile phone was missing. I tried to call his number, no luck, so decided to text number. While standing in Baker St lost property office, my phone rang. His phone had been found and handed in. Many thanks to Andy and all the staff at London Underground. In fact to all the Londoners for a great Olympics.

  • After the technical rehearsal, the 'buzz' on the Tube was completely different from anything I'd ever experienced, with people talking to each other. One small group of friends alighted the Tube and one had inadvertently left his BlackBerry on the seat. Another passenger immediately jumped up and ran after him to return it forthwith. I had never seen this type of behaviour on the London Underground.

  • Boarding a hot and busy Covent Garden lift, I am accompanied by a man who rudely 'tells' another man near the front, stood by myself, to move forward into the apparent space in front of him. The man apologizes and explains he's unable to move down any further as his small child is occupying the space in front. The arrogant man refuses to believe there is a small child/refuses to care for the well being of the child in this crowded lift (which I can see starting to become scared of this man shouting at her dad) and continues to aggressively argue with the helpless man. Astounded by this man's awful attitude towards the child and the tiny bit of space she is standing in, as a young woman aged 23 (and a lot smaller than this rude man!) I decided to be brave and confirm that 'he can't move forward, there is a small child in front of him, don't be so rude'. This immediately silenced the man for which the father thanked me for alongside smiles of gratitude from other passengers. Kindness costs nothing but is worth everything, and courage comes in all shapes and sizes!

  • On a Tube ride home one evening, I noticed a young lady had started to cry. Two women who I at first thought knew her, turned out to be two complete strangers who kindly sat next to her and comforted her. Sadly, the young woman revealed she had just been told she may have a life threatening illness. The two strangers did a great job at calming her down and being there for her, and offered their numbers at the end of the Tube ride to arrange a drink together. What's more, from out of the blue a young lad pulled out a pack of tissues which he then gave to the lady to dry her eyes. These strangers made all the difference to her day, possibly her life, all with 15 minutes.

  • One evening somewhere on a very packed Piccadilly line a beautiful man sat down on the seat next to me. We kept glancing at each other, and then away again, both giggling. Smiling at me he said, "Isn't it funny how society says we shouldn't talk to people on the train" - so we did. We sat on the train together, and talked until I had to get off, he got off too and helped me with my bags, and then tentatively, asked for my number. I gave it to him. As I said goodbye and got on a bus, my phone rang. It was him, asking if he could see me that week. Our three year anniversary is October this year. We'll always be known as 'the couple that met on the train'

  • Visiting London for the first time during the Olympics we were separated from my son on the Underground. We arranged to meet at Bank station not knowing there are many exits. Though my son is an adult he has a disability and it was the end of a long day. One member of the Underground staff took charge of the situation and we were soon reunited. A happy end to a very stressful situation.

  • I was working in London as a fundraiser one day outside a cupcake shop. After a tiring day's work the owner of the shop treated me with a free cupcake. I was looking forward to eating this when I got home. But on the train, a woman sat there crying because her boyfriend broke up with her. So I asked her, what's wrong? Listened to her, told her it would be all right and offered her the cupcake. She laughed and thought it was a nice gesture... hopefully brightening her day!

  • I was returning from New York one Thursday morning. I got off at Boston Manor with a suit case too large for all 5:1 of me to handle . A young man ran down the stairs hoping to catch the train I had just got off. I did think about sticking my foot in the door way to stall the train but I was too concerned about my own problem. The train left, he missed it, I avoided his eyes. He said " Can i carry that case up the stairs for you"? Very humbling and very kind.

  • I was sat in a Tube carriage as it approached a station, debating whether to get off and open my fast during Ramadan or remain on the train. I decided to take a chance as I wasn't far from home but miscalculated the time it would take to get back. A group of students boarded a train armed with some fruit. They just got up and started offering them to all the passengers whilst eating themselves including me. I was able to open my fast thanks to their generosity and warmth.

  • I boarded a sweltering rush hour Tube train whilst heavily pregnant and there wasn't a seat in sight. I stood patiently agonising about the twenty or so stops I still had to traverse knowing that my chances were slim as the train was likely to get busier. A lady stood next to me tapped a young male passenger and requested that he give up his seat for me informing him of my condition. The selfless lady went about reading her newspaper without fuss and disappeared into the ether that is London never to be seen again. To her I am forever grateful.

  • Helping out as a volunteer at the Olympics I wasn't able to catch the Opening Ceremony. When I got on the Central line to travel back home I was in a carriage with some of the NHS workers who had been performing. They passed on their enthusiasm and joy through their laughter and when people said how much they loved it they quite spontaneously got up and danced their way through the routine in the middle of the carriage. What a gift!

  • I was traveling back from work at 1:45 and changed at Mile End to catch a train towards Epping. I left all my documents from work, iPad, my jacket and my grandfather's wallet on the seat next to me. My things traveled to East Ham where an angel picked them up and handed them untouched to the lost property office. I cannot thank you enough - you have restored my faith in people.

  • I didn't know it at the time but I was suffering from the after effects of a nasty concussion. I thought I was just feeling a bit under the weather on my way into the office. The Tube was packed, stuffy and I started to gag. I tried to pretend I wasn't surrounded by strangers looking at me, and desperately searched for tissues or anything suitable in my bag. Nothing. The lady next to me gave me the carrier bag that she was using to hold her lunch, literally just as about to be sick all over the contents of my handbag. It all happened so quickly and I was so grateful. The kindness didn't end there as I got off the Tube at a very busy Victoria station and sat with my head between my knees. Several people stopped to help me, sat with me whilst I composed myself and one lady gave me a mint. After a trip to hospital, I got the all clear. A plastic bag, kindness, patience and a mint. It made a world of difference.

  • I had just split with my boyfriend and was carrying everything I owned across London. A series of people stopped to help me navigate my way up and down endless flights of stairs. Most notably PC Paul from the BTP who was unfortunate enough to be the recipient of my tears but who carried my suitcase through London Bridge and onto a Tube. Also to the lady who couldn't manage to lift my case up the stairs but who caught up with me after I left Harringay station to help me carry some of my lighter bags down the street. I'm eternally grateful.

  • I was running for the bus on my first day of work, and I was only 19 so it was my first ever real job. The bus driver must have seen me, but I was too late and the bus past. Another bus, who was about to start his shift opened the doors of his bus- I explained I'd been running for the other bus not his. He said, "I know, but hop on, we'll chase the other bus". I got on, stood next to the driver and we drove down the road, quite quickly trying to catch up with the other bus. Of course the driver had to stop and pick up other people, so I never made it, but it was the kindest thing that he could have done. It really made my day and I managed to get to my job on time, in a very good mood, inspired by the generoisty of a stranger.

  • One night after I'd just moved to London I went for some drinks and got far too drunk, and tried to get a bus home. I got off much too early, and found myself lost in the middle of London, terrified and confused. I was crying when two girls approached me, asked if I was ok, explained where I was, found out where I lived and then called me a cab, checked I had enough cash on me, and waited till I was safely in the cab. I owe them so much, it doesn't bear thinking about. And what goes around comes around because years later I returned the favour. Heading home one night after some drinks with my husband and some friends, saw a young woman leaning against a wall at Embankment, half way up the stairs, crying into a phone. She was very drunk. I asked her if she was ok and she said she was trying to get to her boyfriend's house but she didn't understand what to do. I sat her down, took the phone off her and spoke to the boyfriend who told me his address and her name. I told him I'd get her home. I walked her slowly back up the stairs, and out to a waiting line of cabs. I put her in the cab, told the cab driver where she needed to go, and explained that she was drunk and that the boyfriend was contactable on her mobile. I then rang the boyfriend back on her phone and told him she was in a cab and heading for him. He was incredibly relieved. It took me all of five minutes to do this, but I am sure it made all the difference too as it had for me that time so many years ago.

  • At about 6 months pregnant I was on a crowded Tube feeling rather invisible as I stood yet again for the whole journey. Just as I was stepping onto the platform a woman slipped past, smiled and said congratulations. I was so shocked that I didn't respond until she has disappeared into the crowd. I wish I could have thanked her for her gesture; it was a moment of kindness and celebration of new life that made my day!

  • I was coming up the escalator at Victoria. There was a blind lady and her guide dog at the top; the guide dog was struggling with the escalator and didn't want to set his paw on it. Two Underground staff appeared, one took the blind lady by the hand and led her down the escalator while the other gently picked up the Labrador and carried him down, all the way talking to him and stroking him. I melted.

  • After a generally miserable week and a particularly difficult day - I was returning home on the Jubilee line. Feeling full of tears, I stood on the Tube, trying to hold the tears back and stay composed. A gentleman further up the carriage I had noticed was writing a letter, which I didn't take too much notice of. Until the letter was eventually passed up the carriage to me. I kept this letter with its kind words and smiley face for many years. The concern and kind words from this stranger on the Tube always reminds me not to lose faith or believe in people or society.

  • About 15 years ago, I lost a small diamond earing - a treasured 21st present from my parents - in the ridged mat at the entrance to Finchley Road Tube. As I scrabbled on the floor among rush hour commuter legs, a much older man asked me what was wrong and seeing my distress, got down on his knees to help me. About ten minutes later, he found my earring. To his surprise I flung my arms around his neck and gave him a kiss on the cheek in thanks. I never knew his name. I'm 44 now and still wear the earrings every day. I've never forgotten his kindness.

  • My friend and I were on our way to Stratford today for a morning of opening ceremony rehersals when we spotted a toddler looking at us. After a minute of checking us out he slapped on the biggest smile and instigated a game of pram peek a boo. Such a great young chap that shows how kindness can start at any age.

  • After arriving at North Acton station on the Central line, and climbing the stairs up I saw a lady with a 3-4 year old girl and a baby in the baby cart, she was trying to carry that with her daughter catching hands and walking down nearly 40 step stairs. Although I was in a real hurry I stopped by and carried her cart down the stairs. The funny thing was that when I climbed the stairs leaving I saw her friend waiting with two kids and a cart and I certainly did that again.

  • A couple of weeks ago, I'd forgotten & left my library book on a train in London.Today, I phoned the library to say that I'd lost it, dreading the fines & cost of replacing the book. Then I was told that someone had found the book and actually gone and handed it in to Wallington library! I know it's just a library book, but I am so Thankful to the kind person for their good deed &act of kindness,especially going to all the trouble!Knowing that there are good-hearted, generous people out there has truly made my week, and weekend! :-)

  • One morning rush hour, I was coming up the escalator at Liverpool St, when there was a bit of disruption ahead of me. From my vantage point I could see a woman sinking down on her step, propped up by the student on the step below. Seeing that she was continuing to collapse and was in danger of trapping her hair, the young man (who didn't look like he had the strength to support himself, let alone anyone else), somehow picked her up and carried her up the rest of the escalator. The rest of us stared, amazed at his inner strength and balance.

  • I was new to London and travelling at rush hour to Waterloo from the City to meet a friend. I had no idea where I was going once I got off at Waterloo, and asked the girl in front of me on the escalator how to get out. She was so lovely, told me to stay with her and she'd help me navigate my way round. She was so friendly, told me all about her life, her boyfriend, etc! I've never forgotten it. She gave me a hug and a kiss when we parted ways. I wish I'd got her name.

  • It was the 7th July. A day for celebration. We had won the Olympics. But the joy was to be disrupted by an enormous explosion. We were at Edgware Road. Smoke filled the carriage and with it fear. Right by me was a petrified German mother, and two children. One boy. One Girl. Screaming, crying, not understanding the English announcements and afraid. A young lad - no older than mid-20s takes out his ipod, hands it to the children, and plays them music and calms them down. And from fear came hope, humanity. From an act of division an act of unity.

  • I stopped to help a collapsed man obviously in extremis, and I thought at first having a fit. It became clear he was having the most severe form of asthma attack (status asthmaticus) and was at risk of dying. Myself, and another doctor who stopped, called for help, checked over but had no equipment or drugs (neither of us was working) - a train stopped and I shouted for anyone who had an inhaler in 2 or 3 carriages and a mother handed over her small son's inhaler - paused, seeing the man on the platform thru' the windows and I imagine picturing her son in that state - and then handed over her boy's 'spacer' complete with cherished child's stickers. The doors closed as she bent down to explain to the alarmed toddler why his 'puffer' had just been given to an alarming shouting strange man and I raced back to the collapsed man. Her quick thinking and generosity with her son's spacer saved the man's life as he was too far gone to use an inhaler without it. I never got to thank her nor know if she realised quite how important her quick thinking and kindness were.

  • Once on a train from Baker Street after travelling to London from Birmingham, I was utterly starving after not having eaten all day. I noticed a woman across from me with a pack of cream cakes recently purchased from a supermarket; driven by hunger, I politely asked if I could buy one off her for the marked price on the pack. Kindly, she refused to allow me to pay her and insisted I have it for free. To the lady who fed me a free cream cake that day: thanks. You have no idea how hungry, or grateful, I was.

  • Was at Barking station, a few months back now, but as I got to the top of the stairs I noted a lady with a buggy trying to get down, a man had just got to the top of the stairs himself, he selflessly turned around and helped the lady down with her pushchair before climbing all the way back up.

  • I was on my way back to the office from a meeting in Farringdon. When I arrived at the platform a train had just pulled away. As I looked up to see when the next one was due, I noticed a black folder on top of a metal box. Intrigued I picked it up to find that it was an iPad, luckily it wasn't password protected. I took the owner's home phone number and called it when I was back in the office. The owner's wife answered the phone and arranged for me to meet her husband at Oxford Circus Tube station to be reunited with his expensive gadget. What comes around, goes around....

  • I was on the Tube at lunchtime when a middle-aged man got on at the other end of the carriage. He looked very worn and down-trodden and was probably homeless. He asked one or two people if they had any change, but they ignored him. I fiddled around in my bag. I wasn't sure that I had any. But, before he moved to my end of the carriage, he passed by a business man who was eating a rather large filled flat roll - so large that it had been cut in two and he was still struggling to control it. The business man explained he hadn't any change, but that he was welcome to share his lunch. He tore his polystyrene container in half and divided his entire lunch, sandwich, chips, salad into the lid and container, and handed the man half, and gestured for him to sit down opposite him. Then he reached into his lunch bag and brought out a sachet of salt - shook that over their divided chips, and squirted a dollop of ketchup on each their portions. The homeless man looked stunned at the other man's kindness. The business man chatted to him quietly, and they passed the rest of the journey eating their shared lunch and talking. Suddenly the business man jumped up, realising we were at his stop. His hand plunged again into his apparently bottomless lunch bag, pulling out a chocolate bar,a slice of homemade cake and a flask of tea. Then he shoved it back in the bag as we pulled into the station and pressed it upon the homeless man, flask and everything, "Enjoy your dessert - especially the cake - my daughter made it for my birthday - but she'll be even happier for you to enjoy it and I have plenty more at home!" The last was rather muffled as he jumped off the train in the nick of time.

  • Once, when I was very little (circa 1990) I had gone with a friend and his parents to see a children's play in central London. Before going back to the station, we had gone into Chinatown to see the New Year celebration. Suddenly, we were swept into the crowd, my friend's mum, him, his brother, a pushchair and myself. His dad had gone ahead to the station. My friend's mum started to cry quietly, we were all very short and there was no way we would be able to get back to the station with the pushchair and everything, plus she was trapped in a crowd with four children under six and was worried we would get separated. Out of nowhere, a punk couple appeared, with massive platform shoes, piercings and mohican hair. They had seen our predicament and without us even saying what we needed, said, "Don't worry - we'll get you out!" They lifted the pushchair above everyone's heads and we trailed out behind them as the crowds parted. My friend's mum tried to thank them, but they disappeared back into the crowd before she could say much. However, we've never forgotten how they swooped in out of nowhere and remain eternally grateful for their help!

  • Travelling on the District Line one rainy Saturday afternoon, a man sat down next to me and immediately struck up a conversation. Feeling a little wary of this stranger at first, his kind and open nature soon put me at ease. The train was crowded with Chelsea supporters, and when we both got up to leave the carriage he turned to me and said quietly, "The quality of your life is determined by the quality of your thoughts". Those words felt so profound then, and they still do. I have the quote on a piece of paper that sits next to my computer at work. I read it every day and it reminds me that we can learn so much from the people around us - even complete strangers.

  • I was travelling on the Central line towards Mile End when I notice an old woman standing up on the train because there weren't any chairs available, I felt sorry for the old women so I gave her my seat and she thanked me, I had a strange feeling in my stomach, this feeling is helpfulness which felt good to me. I love helping people because helping people makes me happy which makes society greater.

  • One hot, stuffy morning on the Central line, a coughing fit overtook me to the extent I couldn't breathe. After about 5 minutes of embarrassment, a young Japanese girl sat down next to me and passed me a bottle of water. With little English all she could say was 'drink'. I was hugely grateful for her rescuing me from a very hot and bothered moment.

  • I'd carelessly hooked my key ring, holding my house keys, studio keys and car keys, into my back jeans pocket before I sat on a crowded Central line train to Bond Street. I'd left the train and was on the platform when I heard shouting and turned back to the carriage doors. A dark haired woman was standing holding out my big bunch of keys to me through the open doors. I said a heartfelt thank you as I put my hand out and took them from her and with a split second to spare, just as the keys changed hands, the doors closed! A huge thank you again!

  • I woke up to a phone call from my dad telling me my much loved grandpa had died. On the Tube over to my parents I couldn't stop crying. The woman sitting next to me asked if I was ok, and I told her my grandpa had died that morning. She took my hand and held it for the rest of the journey. I have never forgotten how comforted I felt by this small, intimate act.

  • I was standing in the middle of a packed carriage, holding two heavy bags and a coffee. I was unable to hold on to a bar to steady myself and inevitably, as the train left the station, I lost my balance and spilt a small amount of coffee onto the light coloured jeans of the lady sat in front of me. Embarrassed, I gushed - "I'm so sorry!" She smiled and said "It's ok." The carriage emptied up at the following stop and I took a seat opposite her. I looked at her knee where I'd spilt the coffee and realised it I'd spilt more than I had originally thought... Maybe she was burnt? Maybe the coffee was going to stain? Maybe they were really expensive jeans? I could feel my face turning red with embarrassed guilt as I stared at my deed... It was another two stop before she left the carriage, but as she got up she smiled at me again and said slowly "Don't worry - it's o.k!" I remember breathing a sigh of relief and thinking how lucky I was to spill coffee on such a forgiving passenger.

  • On Christmas eve I was due to travel back to my family in Reading for two weeks. I was travelling home straight after work by train that evening and packed an enormous bag of my things and presents. It was too heavy for me to carry, but I was stupidly, determined to manage it all and somehow painfully made it onto the Tube and to Tottenham Court Road. On the escalator, a man saw that I was suffering. He picked up my bag and carried it not only up the escalator, but out of the Tube station and then the ten minutes to my office. He wished me a merry Christmas and disappeared. I've never forgotten his kindness.

  • When I was heavily pregnant and travelling on the Tube during a very hot April, I was really touched by the kindness people showed me. Not just offering me a seat, but water, wet wipes, anything to ease my discomfort. One lady even gave her mini fan to use! That was a great day! Lots of people were very friendly, asking me when I was due, telling me about their children and passing on tips. It made me see the people around me on my daily commute as people again! It was lovely!

  • I was on a very crowded Central line platform at Liverpool St. An elderly couple struggled onto a train, the lady with a precarious toehold and her back to the platform. It looked like she would get pushed back onto the platform and they might get split up - look of panic! Only one thing for it - as the doors started to close, I gave the lady a good shove in the back, and off they went together.

  • One evening I was travelling home from work. Countless things seemed to have gone wrong over the previous week and it all became too much. I desperately tried to conceal my tears. But failed miserably. A kind man sat next to me silently passed me a tissue, and another, who had been sat opposite, passed me a note as he stood to leave at his stop. I opened it and all it said was 'it will be ok'. My gratitude to those around me made me cry more - but I'll never forget it - and always try to do my best by others on London transport :)

  • My boyfriend & I were on a weekend trip to London & on entering a museum my bf realised he was missing his wallet, which included our return train tickets & his Oyster card. As he was about to make some calls & cancel his cards he got a call from the National Blood Service. For lack of any contact details, the lovely Glaswegian family who'd just found my bf's wallet called them & the NBS called Joe with the family's contact number. We met them by the Palace of Westminster where we were reacquainted with Joe's wallet & acquainted with the loviest young family you could meet. They turned a potential disaster into a lovely story about how good people can really be.

  • I had my phone stolen whilst in a shop in Covent Garden this weekend and felt really vulnerable,angry & upset with London...this one event had been enough to make me hugely disappointed in Londoners and started to make me regret moving here from the suburbs a year ago. But I've been meaning to add the Acts of Kindness I've been shown on the Underground to this web page for a few months now, and just spent an hour reading pages of everyone elses stories...it reminded me that there are still far, far more good, honest, kind people in our city than there are bad. There are so many strangers out there who do lovely things without expecting anything at all in return. It's been enough to finally put a smile on my face after five days!

  • As I travelled northbound to Belsize Park on the Northern line, late evening towards the end of November 2011, the tears that had been threatening to spill over since the beginning of my journey starting silently sliding down my cheeks at around Camden Town.Thank you to the lady on the Underground who handed some tissues to a girl with a white coat and red shoes that could only manage to whisper 'thank you' at the time.

  • I am constantly amazed by the kindness of strangers who I can rely on to offer me a hand with a bag as big as me (I'm only 5ft2) every Friday, without fail when travelling out of London to see my parents for the weekend. I always look a sweaty, flustered mess struggling with handbag & carrier bag in one hand, blue wheely case in another. At Hampstead Heath station - around December time - one young chap in a grey woolly hat arrived on the opposite platform, was leaving the station, but reentered just to help me down the steps to simply turn back round & go on his way. One of many chivalrous Londoners out there.Thank you to you all! :o)

  • I had to get home from London to Wales as soon as possible I could to say my goodbyes to a family member dying of cancer. I was listening to my iPod when Sex Bomb came on, which irrationally made me start to cry. Hysterically. The girl sat opposite me asked me if I was okay and talked to me all the way to King's Cross, even though I looked crazy and was howling. Thank you for being so kind, Sarah from Oxfam!

  • Victoria station, rush hour, mega busy. An elderly gentleman fell over on the staircase at Victoria Tube, his bag went flying, and he hit his head on the steps. An obviously professional man, he appeared stunned but embarrassed, and shocked. He landed on his face, people trod over him and rushed past. I stopped and picked up his bag, another man stopped and helped. We offered first aid, he declined, we knew he was ok. I felt it my duty and pride to offer another human being the help and support we would all wish we have. We should not judge on the basis of the apparent circumstances, since there is more to all of us.

  • I fainted on the Overground this morning and managed to hit my head rather hard. Four people helped me, looked after me and made sure I was OK while we waited for the ambulance to arrive. Thank you to all of you. I wish I knew your names so I could properly say thank you, but you were so kind to me and you made my embarrassment a little more bearable! Thank you so so much!

  • I fell down outside Woodford station (and later found out that I'd broken my arm) my hand was bleeding quite profusely and was painful to move. I decided to continue on my journey to work anyway. I stopped by the shop on the platform to buy some plasters for the cuts on my hand. The shop keeper kindly gave me some plasters and a bottle of water for free to dress my wounds. He was so kind.

  • I seem to have developed a rather nasty chesty cough, which I'm blaming on the constant change in weather. When on the Tube and coughing people tend to look away, concerned that just by looking they too may catch your cold. However today a old lady walked from one end of the Tube over to me and offered me a cough sweet. Not only did this soothe my throat but it made me smile. Thank you

  • One morning last year I had got on a very crowded and hot Northern line feeling a bit unwell. As we approached Moorgate I started to feel more unwell and stood up to get off. Next thing I remember is waking up on the floor having passed out and having had the emergency cord pulled for me. I was deeply embarrassed and tried to rush off the Tube but a number of passengers made me sit down and drink some water. I was surprised how helpful people were.

  • The person who writes a daily quotation onto the white board at Clapham South station warms my heart and makes me smile. Thank you for your thoughfulness and I hope you know you brighten up an otherwise mundane commute! Keep it up :-)

  • After heading off the platform at Plaistow, I came across a young man rolling off the train in his wheelchair. With massive stairs in front of us there was no way he'd be able to get up and after a bit of awkward eye contact we both chuckled and I offered to lift him up the stairs. I brought him out of his wheelchair and picked it up and took it to the top of the stairs. He thanked me and we had an amazing conversation afterwards.

  • I was going through a difficult time and I was crying on the train from Victoria to Clapham Junction. A girl offered me a tissue from a hand-made little cotton purse. Her grandmother made it especially for her to hold hankies. I couldn't tell her why I was crying or stop. But the care that purse was made with and the love it represents, somehow made things a little better.

  • I was on a late night train back to Redbridge on a Friday night. I managed to grab a seat and as usual, I started scrolling through my iPhone, listening to the various tracks I had chosen. The train stopped, and a young gentlemen who was sitting next to me, left a note on my lap as he got up to leave. The other passengers around me who noticed, started asking me to read out what he wrote, assuming that it was some sort of romantic gesture. The note said the following: " I saw you flicking through your playlists ..don't be weirded out but listen to Josh Pyke - "Middle of the Hill" and any song by Chris Carneau. Enjoy!" Of course, when I got home I looked them up on iTunes and I am glad to say they were good choices.

  • I was on a very busy platform at the weekend. An American family got off the carriage but left a little girl behind in the rush. Her face completely crumpled in the seconds after the door closed and as the carriage pulled out. I think all of us on the platform thought the worst. A few minutes later she was returned by an older woman - who had got off with the little girl at the next stop, and caught the Tube back with her - and dropped her back with her (I think) amazed family who had not known what to do. And then she just waited to catch another Tube.

  • I remember seeing this on Tube one evening after the peak hour rush. A woman entered the carriage and as she sat down some papers fell from her bag. A man sitting opposite leaned forward and helped gather the papers from the floor. This exchange initiated a conversation between the two. They continued to warmly laugh and talk for about ten minutes until it was the woman's stop. Looking disappointed, she announced it was her station, said goodbye and got off. The man remained on the Tube. Sat there. Door open. Thinking. Then suddenly dashed out, moments before the Tube doors shut, walking briskly after her down the platform. It was kinda cute.

  • I tell you, you London Tube riders rock. Seriously. I have a toddler and a stroller and a temperamental back & I cannot tell you how grateful I am that kind and thoughtful people, without my even asking or looking at them, offer to help me with my stroller up and down those rascally Tube station stairs. And it's not always just a stroller & baby. On occasions it is also laden with bags, food, shopping, general child paraphernalia etc. as well. A thousand thank you's to the 12 (yes 12 on different occasions/stations) people who helped me just in this past week. It's people like you who make me smile and feel a little bit cared for and remind me why I love London. Thank you.

  • I'd just moved back to London, looking for a job and was finding city life hard to readjust to. Getting out at Holborn one day I saw a family, dad with two little ones, mum and a baby in a pram, the mother looking worried. I stopped and offered to help her with the pram and ended up going down escalators and the stairs with her. We didn't have a mutual language but at the end she gave me the best smile and a big hug, it made my day much better!

  • On our way to see Bugsy Malone and all dressed up we were constantly thwarted by works on the line and were very late. A strong gust of wind at Embankment blew my son's pork pie hat onto the line and the outing was turning disasterous. His Dad said "well that's that it's a goner" we felt like giving up on the whole outing. On the off chance I mentioned it to a supervisor who said "you need a hat for Bugsy Malone" sprang into action, stopped the train leapt onto the line and rescued the hat. I love that man. It was the best bit of the day my son said.

  • My boyfriend broke up with me and then dropped me off at the Hampstead Tube station. I was miserable and tried to hold back my tears as I took the lift down to the station platform. A girl in the lift came up to me and said "You just had a break-up, right? I can tell. You poor thing." She gave me a BIG hug and chatted to me for 10 minutes. It really cheered me up. It truly felt as if she was an angel sent down to give me hope.

  • I go through Shadwell station every Thursday as I drop off and pick up my daughter from her Granny's house. Invariably fellow commuters help me with the buggy up or down the 20 or so stairs to lifts. Recently a woman saw me struggling down the steps as the train arrived. She knocked on the driver's window, asked him to wait, dashed up the stairs, helped me down them and thanked the driver as we dashed past his window through the open doors. I thanked her profusely and she waved me off saying she had kids and knew what it was like. If I had missed that train I would have had to 15 minutes for the next one, not the best way for a tired mummy and grumpy 2 year old to spend their time!

  • Heavily pregnant, with a large protruding bump, I dreaded my daily Northern Line commute. One particularly awful day I found I was unable to get onto three successive trains due to the crush at the door. I was becoming increasingly distressed but working hard not to show it. I tried to catch the eye of a rather stern-looking professional woman, hoping for a sympathetic smile, but she didn't acknowledge my look. Then as the next train's doors opened and the fourth mad crush of my morning began, she suddenly sprang to life and shouted "there is a pregnant lady here, let her on please". She escorted me onto the train, and demanded that I be given a seat. I flopped into the chair, overwhelmed to the point of tears, but she still didn't look at me and I was never able to thank her for her selfless kindness.

  • On my way to a 9am lecture feeling particularly grim, the Tube driver announced "We are now approaching Mile end, God bless and take care. Keep smiling." It cured my Monday morning blues and put me in a good mood for the rest of the day. Thankyou!

  • Today was an awful day. Heavily pregnant I found I had been made redundant and, hormonal and depressed, started on my way home. The escalators being broken at St Paul's was just another disappointment in an all together miserable week. Just as I turned to lift my suitcase a young man of about 20 appeared; cool, attractive and relaxed he lifted my bag for me with a simple "I'll take that for you". He carried it all the way to the bottom, enquiring about how far along I was and finally wishing me a nice day before going along on his way. After he left I burst into tears. This simple act of kindness rekindled my faith in humanity. Thank you, stranger, for making my day.

  • Having travelled on the Tube for 30 years and never having had a curious incident, on a very hot summer's morning in 2010 (it may have been 2009) the Victoria line was stuck between Highbury and King's Cross. I began to feel very faint and untoward and shrunk to the ground fearing I would pass out & my bodily functions would misbehave. A very lovely lady spotted me, gave me her seat, fanned me, dabbed me with water, gave me a drink & saved me from humiliation and I would love to be able to thank her.

  • Whilst exiting Old Street station in haste, on my way into work with great urgency, I was the first to notice a blind man struggling to mount the escalators to the top. I helped shepherd him to the surface, said my farewells and went about the last leg of my commute. It was only when I scheduled a last look back that I noticed he was still struggling to navigate the ticket machine forecourt (hard for most people at that rush hour let alone the visually impaired). I went back, reintroduced myself and walked him to his meeting half way up City Road. We chatted all the way about family, friends and life. He was a very pleasant fellow who wished me all the best with my upcoming marriage to my now wife Sophie and thanked me for taking the time to help him. I wish that was part of my journey to work every day.

  • I'm 19 years old young boy I'm passing from APLASTIC ANEAMEA diseases. 1 day I'm travelling from Stratford to Notting Hill Gate before three stops my nose starts bleeding and my body start shaking then I'm getting off the train and 1 of your staff member give me a hand he help me to sit on chair and do wireless, he giving me lots of hope and he do wireless call, so now I'm really happy with TfL staff cause they help every person in any condition.

  • Late at night, two teenagers from the north of England had accidentally got onto the Reading-Paddington train. They'd meant to go to Salisbury! Overhearing their frantic, tearful conversation, I rang National Rail Enquiries and found out there was no train back, so I introduced myself and took them to Waterloo by Tube. It was their first time on the Underground. Hopefully, they managed to get to Salisbury in the end, and liked their introduction to the London Underground!

  • I had a special event in Central London that day and due to excitement and being busy I hadn't eaten all day. My friends joined me at the event and we were making our way home on the central line at 12.30am. I was beginning to be feel faint at that point but was sticking it out till we got home. The Tube was packed with people and a guy stood beside me with a bag full of take away sushi. As a joke I offered to buy his sushi off him as he was getting off at his stop. He cheerfully said...you want some? And he handed out two big trays to me and my friend for free and jumped off the train. It was so nice and we thoroughly enjoyed the nice sushi.

  • I was in London for the first time. I clutched my red luggage and a creased address and no English knowledge at all. On the Tube, a girl was carrying a dog in her arms, it was staring at me frightened: it also did not understand. The girl caught me looking painfully at her dog: her smile my first understanding.

  • I was carrying a very heavy and awkward box holding a wedding cake I had made for my friend, & had what felt like 100 Tube changes to get there. As I struggled off one Tube, a man asked if I wanted help. I said no, that I was fine, & immediately regretted it. As I got to the top of the escalator there he was waiting for me, and without a word took the box from me, and walked with me to my next Tube, put me on the Tube, smiled, and walked off.

  • Some time ago I was at Whitechapel Tube and saw an elderly chap trying to retrieve something from under a seat on the station platform. It was clear that it was going to be nigh on impossible for him to get whatever it was because he couldn't bend down. I offered to help and bent down to look at what was under there ... his false teeth! I took a deep breath, grabbed the teeth, gave them to him and, smiling, got on the next train.

  • I was on the Tube earlier this week travelling from Acton Town to Baron's Court. A mature gentleman came into the carriage at Hammersmith and I offerd him my seat. When he declined, I told him I was only going one more stop. Just then, the movement of the train made him fall against some people. I leapt up and assisted him saying "Well that just goes to show that you DO need this seat!" He was grateful to me and sat down.

  • A blind man walked onto the Tube train on which I was travelling. As the doors closed, he reached out his right hand, trying to locate the central pole. He missed it, but then a young lady gently took hold of his hand and placed it onto the pole. It was a swift and simple gesture, but the kindness and humanity of it moved me to tears.

  • As my family were walking along outside the Tate Modern we met a lady asking directions to the nearest Tube station, when I asked where she was heading she said 'King's Cross' as this was where I was heading I offered for her to join me, we left my family outside London Bridge Tube station and travelled together to King's Cross, I am not confident on the Tube but having some one depending on me to get her there brought out a strong side in me I did not realise I had, and it was so nice to have company on what I find a very nervous and scary journey, she talked all the way which made the journey go so fast, I left her at the information point at King's Cross to continue on her journey.

  • I'm a type1 diabetic of 5yrs. Then newly diagnosed, I was late for a baby shower in town, changing bags I rushed out the door. On the Tube a French man asked me directions. I was going same way so we chatted and travelled together. Just before Russell Square I hypo'd , but changing bags before, I left my glucose tablets at home. Panicking I told the man in broken English I needed to leave to get sugar. The door opened and I ran. But the man stopped me and said his grandma was diabetic and not to worry he would see me safe. With that he calmly walked me outside, sat me down and bought me a lucozade and waited till I felt better. I will be forever greatful to him and i have never been without my glucose tablets since. Thanks Mr Kind French Man ;) x

  • Racing through London Bridge, on our way back from holiday ,suitcases in hand, the staff in the ticket hall asked which Tube we needed. When we said southbound Northern line they told us the last train was already in the platform, then spoke into walkie talkies and got the staff on the platform to hold the train for us. Would have been a nightmare getting home without them.

  • Outside the station I discovered my purse was missing. Returning home to cancel cards I stopped and asked the friendly TfL staff member for help: "Today's your lucky day" he said. A wonderful couple travelling in my carriage had handed it in at the next stop. Staff there had just rung through to say it had been found. THANK YOU.

  • I was on the Northern line, getting off at St. Pancras & a young man saw me struggling with my 3 bags and offered to help. I was off to the Eurostar, he needed the Piccadilly line. That young man walked my suitcases and me all the way to the Eurostar, he went completely out of his way. Really are great people in this city!

  • I often have to take the Waterloo & City line in rush hour, and am so grateful to the drivers wishing passengers, when we get to Waterloo, not only a safe journey, but also to enjoy our evening, (once or twice it's even been "Have a good night out!". Every little counts!

  • I was walking down a Central line platform the other day with my cello on my way home. As I was about to get on, the driver, who was walking down the platform to start his shift, asked me "How do you manage carrying that big thing?" We then had a great conversation about his guitar!

  • Whilst rushing between the Waterloo and City line and the Northern line at Bank on Monday morning I reached into my coat pocket only to discover to my Oyster card had vanished. Just as I was about to mutter a few choice expletives and turn back to look for it I felt a tap on the shoulder and turned to see a girl about my age who had had clearly chased after me (I was keeping quite a pace!) and was holding out my card - absolute lifesaver!

  • I was stuck on the platform of a delayed Overland train and in a massive hurry, my 6-year old daughter had fallen at school and broken her arm, she was en route in a taxi to a hospital. My phone was not working so I asked the teenager next to me if I could send a message from his phone, he did, the train arrived and was very busy, my daughter called the number back, the phoned was passed along the packed carriage to me so I could comfort her, during this time the lady next to me was going to the same hospital but didn't know the way, I was able to help her and the whole carriage saw how helpful the man had been in letting me use his phone.

  • At 5 months pregnant I was traveling on the Central line during morning commute. Standing as usual. I felt light headed exiting the train at Liverpool Street and began to lose focus. A man walked up to me and took my arm leading me to a seat. Without him I would've passed out and fell to the ground. I just can't remember if I thanked him properly. I hope he knows how much I appreciated him. I have and will always offer a pregnant woman a seat as I've come to find out...we really need it.

  • A young boy jumped onto the seat next to me and the mum was looking around for a seat for herself. I moved to the only other seat, at the other end of the carriage, so she could sit with her baby. She started to thank me but the baby had interrupted her by singing a rude song loudly. The entire tube knew the words were but the baby just mumbled them. The carriage was full of laughter from teenagers to elderly couples (I was quite surprised they knew this song). Even though the child singing would've happened whether I gave up my seat or not, I took it as a giant thank you from the mother and child, and from London Underground. I ended up having a great day, with that rude song stuck in my head. Hah!

  • I was on my way to university and I was late when my drink exploded in my bag. My books were covered in orange squash and my cvs dripping wet. I was kneeled on the platform surrounded by my soaking belongings when a twee old lady waddled over and handed me tissues and a plastic bag and said 'I hope these will be of some use'.

  • My colostomy bag split whilst on the Tube, I was in despair and quite upset. Despite the obvious problems, other passengers offered tissues and assistance. I had to leave the train at the next station (Lancaster Gate) and station staff took over the rescue, getting me to their staff toilet and making sure I was OK. They even contacted my destination station to keep an eye out for me when I resumed my journey!

  • I did that four-stride run to the Tube doors, but they closed. Then they opened just for me. I waved a thank you to the driver at the other end of the platform, then got on: he said "you're welcome" through every one of the speakers on the train.

  • Fresh from a small town I began an internship in London, on my first day I was overwhelmed by the morning commute on the Northern line. A very kind man realised my hestitation as I let several Tubes pass me by at Euston station. After three Tubes whizzed by he grabbed my hand and got me safely on the next train so i wasn't late for my first day. This act of kindness showed me this big city is not such a scary place.

  • AFTERWARDS On the Tube it is strangers' help that makes me cry. A man standing by To let me on the train first. The wreck of me. I crawl with the kindness of it.

  • On a busy morning train, I spotted an elderly blind man and his guide dog boarding. I noticed that as they squeezed on, the dog's tail was still outside the carriage, and in danger of being caught by the closing doors. Before I could yell out, a woman passing by on the platform reached through the doors and tucked in the dog's tail. Her hand made it out just in time and the dog didn't notice a thing.

  • At Christmas we took our Autistic Son to London, seated ourselves on the Underground after which a German lady who had just arrived to spend Christmas with her daughter presented him with a parcel of German cakes she had hastily wrapped. She then wished him a Happy Christmas and returned to her seat as love and emotion filled the carriage.

  • Me and my boyfriend were heading home on a busy Underground train when we noticed a homeless lady wandering around the carriage in need of spare change. When only one person gave and she was about to walk away, I remembered the leftover quarter-chicken I couldn't finish from our Nandos visit that day! Her gratefulness when we gave it to her was enough to make anyone smile.

  • A minor act of kindness but it prevented me having a terrible day. An occasional traveller to London, I was reading as I made my way to Euston to journey home and dropped my oyster card. I didn't notice and would've panicked when I'd realised later, only a kind man opposite gently tapped my knee and pointed at the card. A brief nod and smile were exchanged as tacit acknowledgment. Thank-you.

  • I was on the Central line on my way home, and I sat next to a lovely guy who kept getting up to offer his seats to those who needed it most, when I got to my stop I gave him a note which said 'You're a lovely guy, I hope you have a nice day' and he had the biggest grin after reading the note

  • I tried to take my shoulderbag off and caught my earring in the strap. A very kind man saw this, offered to help and made someone else hold his coffee while he gently untangled the earwire, gave it back to me and apologised for dropping the other part (which I soon found on the floor). I couldn't have freed myself without the help of this lovely gentleman.

  • While travelling to work one day I saw two very smart business women in high heels, discussing the important meeting they were going to. We stopped at a station and a little boy got on. The doors closed and it became clear that the boy's mum had not got on, but was stuck on the platform - as the train pulled out she managed to indicate by gestures that she would get on the next train and meet him at the next station. The two smart ladies immediately took care of the little boy, told him they would look after him and got off the train with him at the next stop to wait for his mother. I was so touched that their important meeting was instantly forgotten in the face of a child in need.

  • I was on a packed Hammersmith and City line train needing to get off at Baker Street. I was by the wrong set of doors and as we arrived at Baker Street there was very little movement from the people around me as no one was getting off, to the point that I thought I'd miss my stop. As I was beginning to panic a lovely man asked if I needed to get off and on hearing I did he proceeded to take my hand and pull me through the crowd to the open doors. His act of kindness made my day.

  • The Tube is always hot & I have lupus which means I'm extra hot. Today a young man leapt up and gave me his seat. I was fanning myself with a magazine when the woman next to me handed me a fan. She stood to get off so I went to hand her the fan back and she said keep it. When I looked at the fan it was covered in butterflies - the symbol of lupus! I was really touched by the unexpected kindness of 2 people.

  • I think people are extraordinarily kind and helpful on the Tube. Several times I have gone from the playground at East Finchley to my home at Archway with my small grandaughter and a baby in a small buggy. Without fail, people help me up and down the steps every time.

  • I was commuting to work when a man stood near me and started grinning madly. This being London at rush hour I tried to ignore him, until he pulled from his bag the same book as I was reading - Rupert Everett's autobiography. We shared a long and funny chat about where we'd got to, what he was up to etc, which made the journey much more fun. I no longer ignore happy strangers...

  • I was fighting off a panic attack once in rush hour and a lady next to me, completely unprompted, offered me her bottle of water and talked to me about her new outfit all the way to my stop to distract me. I was too flustered to thank her properly but it worked, and I'll always remember lovely jeggings lady.

  • I was at King's Cross station, searching in my bag for my Oyster, after taking everything out of my bag and coming to the conclusion that it must be lost a man walked up to me and gave me his travel card, saying he didn't need it and I looked like I could use it. Left a smile on my face that lasted all day!

  • Making my way home onto the Piccadilly line at Heathrow with two enormous suitcases I too eagerly took a seat and painfully crashed my sternum on the armrest bringing tears of pain to my eyes. Other passengers winced for me both for the obvious agony and my for my embarrassment. I was gripping the seat with a hand over my eyes focused on the pain when the passenger opposite caught my attention and offered me his sweet sesame snack with an expression of great empathy . The gesture and the biscuit brought huge comfort to my wounded pride and bottom and a smile to my face. A latter day Esmeralda in male form on the London Underground.

  • I gave up my seat to a young mother with a baby in a sling. After a minute or so she stood back up, the baby was wriggling so much. A recent father myself, we struck up a conversation that lasted between Oxford Circus and Brixton. I've been Underground commuting for twenty years, and have rarely exchanged more than a smile from a fellow passenger. It made my week.

  • We live in Warrington, Cheshire. One day, our answer-phone gave us this message,"I have found this mobile 'phone and am calling the number entitled "Mum and Dad" to say that I will leave it at the Dollis Hill station". The male caller left no identity details.Our son, who lives in Willesden, collected his 'phone. Many thanks to our unknown friend, from Mum, Dad, and Son.

  • I'd been doing a community development workshop and it had been a difficult session, only to be rivaled by the verbal abuse I received from some youths in the street later that day. On the Tube I began to cry, feeling overwhelmed by the situation and a little girl of about 5 came over to me and asked me if I was alright before running back to her parents. She reappeared holding a tissue a few minutes later which her parents had asked her to give to me. They all waved as I got off the Tube and I felt better knowing that there are kind people in London too, counteracting the obnoxious ones.

  • Not strictly a Tube story, but a bus one. I developed epilepsy as an adult and had several seizures before being on the right medication. My last fit was as I got off a bus near Clapham Common fairly late at night in a not too safe area. I hit my head on the pavement so was injured. When I came round in the ambulance the crew told me a woman had seen me fit and got off the bus to take care of me, ring 999 and make sure I was safe - staying with me until they arrived. I never knew who she was, but if you happen to be reading - thank you for all you did for me during a very scary time :)

  • At Camden Town station, where I pass by every day at around 6:30pm on my way home from work, a conducter from Northern Ireland makes the announcements on the platform. Having spent the last 8 years in Belfast (and not being from England) the words 'the train is about to depart, stand clear of the doors' is hugely comforting and makes me feel right at home :)

  • I was rushing off the tube in a hurry to get onto a different line which I could see pulling up onto the platform opposite. Just as the doors of the connecting Tube were closing, a lady narrowly made it through the doors and proceeded to pull something out of her pocket. In my haste to catch my connection, I had dropped my brand new phone on the first Tube. This lady had run after me, jumping onto a Tube she didn't need to be on (going in the opposite direction) just to give it back.

  • I was travelling to Euston on the Central Line when we were delayed by signal failure, and people started chatting. A man asked if I knew the way when I had to change to the Northern Line. Then he took my case, and came with me from Tottenham Court Road all the way to Euston to make sure I got my connection. I would have missed it getting the case up and down all the stairs and elevators. He was so kind and helpful. I live in the north and people say that Londoners think only of themselves - not true!

  • I was travelling back from London to Northampton and had to change Tubes at Green Park. I was totally lost and couldn't find the Victoria line. I seemed to be going up and down the same staircase! Eventually I just stopped and stared when a lady came up to me and said "you look a little lost can I help you"? She took me to the Victoria line platform (she was going my way)and we got on the train together. I was trying to get to Euston and she was going to King's Cross. We had a wonderful chat throughout the short journey - I shall not forget her kindness.

  • I was travelling back from Australia, after a 24 hours in transit and a lovely gentleman carried by 20kg bag up a set of Tube steps for me.. chivalry is not dead! Thank you young man

  • I have two stories: Travelling to Liverpool Street on the 18th September 2011 I kissed my boyfriend goodbye (we were actualy breaking up) I was shaking trying not to draw attention to myself, I walked away with his hand in mine until we didn't reach! "I'm gonna miss you" I said..... Still shaking, head down some nice man comes upto me and says "he was a very lucky man, you're very beautiful" .... It just made me smile :) Coming down the escalators from Liverpool Street and I get a tap on the shoulder from a Gentleman telling me my hand bag was open and he didn't want anything to get stolen :)

  • I was full of a cold on the Tube to work and couldn't help but sniffle and whimper as I struggled to breathe through my nose. The gentleman stood next to be turned and said "you sound as I feel - take these to help you through the day" and offered a small packet of kleenex and strepils. I really did feel better for them.

  • Several years ago I was unemployed and travelling home from yet another unsuccessful job interview. A man sitting opposite me was reading a newspaper, and started writing something on it which he tore off and folded. A few stations later he got off the train, but before he did so he gave me the folded paper. It said 'EVEN THE BAD TIMES ARE GOOD'. I still have that scrap of paper.

  • I was on the way to Uni during rush hour one morning. Getting off at Waterloo I saw a woman with a double buggy struggling to get up the busy stairs. I watched as business man after business man pushed passed her without offering to help. Though I had my hands full I put my stuff to one side as helped the woman up the stairs before going back to get my bags.

  • I was travelling home for Christmas with the world's biggest suitcase filled with (what seemed) to be the heaviest presents I could have purchased. I live on the Central line and was heading for Kings Cross, so I had to change at Bank. For those who know bank they will be aware of the twisty stair case up to the Northern line platform. I was sweatily attempting the asend which is difficult without a huge case. A man with a blue jumper, jogging up passed by and grabbed my case jogging it to the top. I can't tell you how appricative I was of this kind act, I really thought I would die before I reached the top!

  • At a very busy Covent Garden station when only 2 of the lifts were in operation, I was astounded by the genuine kindness of the staff doing crowd control. I was 36 weeks pregnant and had arranged to meet a friend for lunch before the baby arrived. Too tired from the pregnancy to walk to Holborn, I opted to patiently wait with the throngs of tourists at Covent Garden. When a TFL staff member noticed my Baby on Board TFL badge, he parted the crowds and insisted that I come with him (even though I would easily have got on the next lift). He sent me to his colleague who ushered me down in a a private lift! Knowing that the chances of me getting a seat on the tube were slim, they just wanted to make my journey a little bit easier, and for that I am very grateful. The Tube may be old, expensive,smelly and over-crowded at times, but it is an essential part of London that makes me fall in love with this city all over again. I couldn't stop smiling on the Tube the whole way home.

  • One night I was travelling home on the Tube trying hard to stop tears from rolling down my cheeks. In a packed Tube feeling lonely and embarrassed, with a simple touch on the shoulder and a show of concern, I was consoled by a stranger. At my stop another passenger got off and asked if there was anything he could do to cheer me up and with his kind words and the offer of a Dairy Milk and a coffee, made me smile again. Thank you.

  • I'd been crying a lot after finding out that my friend had a terminal illness, and it wasn't until when I was on the Tube, trying to hold it in, that some lovely women lent me a mirror to wipe off mascara tracks on my cheeks. Not only that, but a kind stranger opposite gave me a tissue, asked me what was wrong and then offered me work experience! I was so speechless that I'm not sure if I thanked them properly - but I was extremely touched, and hope that one day they know how comforting they were to me that night.

  • Once, I was very ill while working in London. The Central line was the only way I could get home, but the journey would last two hours. I had no choice. After half an hour, I fainted and fell on the carriage floor. When I came round, a man had picked me up and was carrying me in his arms. I was covered in my own vomit, but he didn't care. He carried me to his seat and put me down there. I could barely speak and couldn't stand. He wouldn't let me thank him, and walked away embarrassed. I never even learnt his name, and wish I could thank him.

  • I have been suffering from seizures for 7 months and I had one on the Underground last week. A lovely guy stayed with me and held my hand until the ambulance came. It was the first seizure I've had on my own so his kindness meant the world to me. I'm so glad he was there.

  • Tourist Outreach. Whenever I see someone looking at a map or lost I'll always offer to point them in the right direction. I've done it for years and keep a daily count of how many people I give directions to (with a complicated scoring system for the success of my help). I'm +4 today.

  • I broke my arm, falling off my bike, so reluctantly got onto the Tube in the middle of rush hour the following week. A man clocked I was in pain and orchestrated the carriage so I could get a seat - a great reminder that Tube travel isn't always grumpy and selfish!

  • I moved from Canada to London for a MSc Applied Positive Psychology - to study kindness and joy. Upon arrival I took the Tube from Heathrow with a suitcase of books, one of clothes and all my worldly belongings. Changing at Bank was tough, but three different people stopped to help me carry my luggage up the stairs. At Clapham a couple of Londoners walked me to the door of my friend's house helping me with the luggage all the way. What an incredible welcome to the UK!

  • Arrived at Latimer Road station on a cold Sunday. As we walked up the stairs to the platform realised there was a train waiting there. I started to run to try to catch it, but my friend had a bad foot and couldn't keep up. We heard the beeping for closing doors but as I ran up the doors didn't close. The driver must have seen us running and held the train the extra 10 seconds for us to get in. Only a small thing, but made a big difference to a long journey home!

  • I was at a station where the stairs are divided into two lanes. A young man was walking up one, and saw a woman with a pushchair struggling to carry it down the other side. He immediately dropped his bag and rushed down and then back up to where she was to help her carry her buggy down the stairs. It was lovely.

  • I was kind to someone today after reading your poster. I guess it was just life imitating art...

  • Hello, as a regular visitor to London, I know how busy the TFL staff are. After a 24 hour flight from Australia, I was weary and befuddled by the escalator, my suitcase and the need to get down to the Piccadilly line - no elevator! I asked the attendant and he kindly took my larger bag on the escalator, chatted all the way down about the "ups and downs" of his day. Thank you for a wonderful start to my time in London.

  • I had just got off the Tube at Bank station and my knee swelled up to the size of a balloon. I couldn't walk at all. After numerous attempts to ask someone to get help failed, a smiley-faced girl rushed to my aid. Whilst wating for a taxi, she stayed with me and kept talking to me, knowing I was in great pain. I'll never forget the kindness she showed to a stranger that dark day.

  • I was wearing my teapot ring (a ring with a teapot and teacups on it) during rush hour and the lady squashed up next to me commented on how nice it was and we started a very nice converstation on the Tube during rush hour - a real rarity!

  • A hot Tube carriage full of noisy Arsenal supporters, mostly men, mostly twice my size and half my age. Suddenly, I start to feel faint, but am too embarrassed to say. One supporter notices, asks me if I'm OK and suddenly the men make more space, fan my face, and someone produces water for me to drink. I hope Arsenal won that night because those fans on the Tube were fantastic.

  • I was travelling home one Sunday evening, dreading the Monday morning which was fast approaching. When we got to the last stop, the driver came over the tannoy and announced: 'Wakey wakey, rise and shine. You're now at the end of the District Line. Alight here for Wimbleydon'. He then went on to remind us that it takes fewer muscles to smile than to frown. Needless to say, a lot of us left the train smiling. I'm very grateful to the driver for cheering up my evening.

  • I had received some awful news and was in a state of utter shock and disbelief. I had to travel on the Tube to meet my family and friends, but could barely function. I sat in tears at Embankment station, and a woman approached and asked if I was ok. I told her I couldn't work out how to get to my destination, and she held onto me and took me there. She should have got off after two stops, but she stayed with me for an extra six stops, then even changed trains with me to make sure I got to my friends. She restored my faith in humanity at one of the lowest points of my life. She could have walked by but she didn't.

  • I was returning home on a packed Tube and standing at the end of the carriage next to me, was a young woman carrying a bag and parcels in one hand and struggling to tie the shoelaces on her boot with the same hand but not succeeding very well. A seated passenger walked over, bent down and smiling, asked if she could help. I was ashamed for not noticing earlier that the young woman had only one arm, but was so relieved that someone had shown her kindness.

  • It was rush hour and I was struggling with a heavy suitcase and two bags at Green Park station. I was so pleasantly when a gentleman offered to help and carried my case all the way up the stairs. Chivalry isn't dead... and Londoners are friendly & helpful!

  • Everytime a person moves seat so that two people together can sit together I think how kind. And what is wonderful is that it happens so often.

  • Photo collection found the Tube and returned to owner by seeing a reoccurring face in the photos to establish the owner. She appeared to work in a bakery and in one photo I saw a phone number on a shop through the bakery window. I phoned the shop to find the address and meet the owner of the CD case.

  • Three years ago my mum had a heart attack at Baker Street, thanks to the kindness of a complete stranger, they gave her CPR until the Paramedics arrived. Our family never found her to give her our immense thanks for saving our mum's life.

  • When coming out of a carriage the new pair of shoes I was wearing caused me to trip up. I went flying and my man bag, which had quite a lot of money in it, flew even further into a crowd of noisy teenagers just out of school. I thought that would be the last I would see of it but no. Some helped me up and some others brought my bag back to me. I was most impressed and gratified!

  • I had a baby girl in May and we've been travelling on the Tube together for the past few months. I don't think I've ever had to wait more than three seconds at the top of a flight of stairs with the pram. Everyone who comes past offers to help lift her down to the train. And that pram's not light...so thank you all.

  • When I had a corneal ulcer, and could hardly see at all, I tried to take the Northern line to Warren St. A young woman helped me: she was diabetic, and a lawyer, and said she knew what it was to have health problems. She got off her train, helped me to street level, and would have taken me to the bus stop, but I told her not to as she would have to pay again to continue her journey. I would love her to know how grateful I was....

  • A woman on the train threw her litter on the floor as she was getting off the train. Seeing this, another woman picked it up and put it back in her bag. As a result she was punched in the face. The carriage was shunned into silence and the poor lady was crying. No-one so much as offered a caring word. I took her by the hand and led her to the office and reported the crime. I was late for work that day and got reprimanded but it was worth it.

  • While travelling on the District line I witnessed a young child in a very distressed state because he needed to to do a wee. Kindly one of the other passengers passed over his near empty water bottle and much to his mother's relief, and some other passengers shock, he was able to relieve himself.

  • The underground, such a public place to be hit by private grief. I just couldn't help the tears. I had to get off the Tube, on to the platform, aim for a seat. A stranger in the rush "are you ok? can I help?" she had already.

  • After an evening celebrating my birthday on 18 August. I got onto the Tube at Bond Street and had to slip off my heels as my feet were throbbing. This exposed two huge and painful blisters. A kind lady opposite reached into her bag and handed me two plasters saying "these will help". Embarrassed, I thanked her and waited for the passengers to filter away before using them!

  • While my girlfriend was coming home from work through a packed Bank station, she noticed a middle-aged man kneeling down and sobbing to himself. People were storming past him as if he didn't exist. Instead of walking-on, she started talking to him and it turned out his estranged father had just died. She sat there and consoled him while he told her his life story. After a while he calmed down, she managed to get a smile out of him and she went upstairs with him and put him in a cab.

  • We were off on a month long backpack adventure across Europe. We had just jumped off at Victoria to buy a wad of travellers cheques and were headed back down... thousands of pounds of numbers hadn't yet been recorded. Franticly my husband searched... his wallet, and the pounds were gone!... a person behind him said "is this your wallet"... we cried with relief... this trip changed our life... imagine if the wallet wasn't returned!

  • I was on the Tube rushing to be by my dying friend's bedside when I got a call, the Tube was above ground,and was told I was too late. I was devastated and burst out crying with no sense where I was. A lovely woman opposite me came and sat next to me and held me and spoke to me whilst everyone else ignored me. I have never forgotten the solace she offered me.

  • I'd never heard of this project, until yesterday when I was heading for the District line at Victoria. Whilst walking down the stairs to the platform, I glanced at an Acts of Kindness poster. I thought: what a lovely idea, but I can't instantly think of an Act. A nano second later I slipped and started to fall down the stairs. I grabbed the rail, my newspaper went everywhere, and I twisted my knee and ankle. Instantly, a very charming young man was helping me up, collecting my paper and asking if I was OK. His mum would be proud! So now I have my own little story - thanks to your poster!

  • Coming home after an xmas party on the Tube we got talking to a lovely man who was carrying boxes of crackers which after a while he started to share with all the people in the carriage - all strangers, but we were all putting on hats,taking turns to read out the jokes and sharing the gifts.. it was just lovely and brilliant fun. The best Tube journey, and if the man should be reading - THANK YOU!

  • After having given blood just near King's Cross station (& left too quickly to catch my train) I was heading down the escalator when I fainted, badly cutting my legs and face. A young Australian girl with a HUGE suitcase immediately came to help me and held me safe until the end of the escalator and then stayed with me until she was sure that I was ok to carry on, despite having a plane to catch herself.

  • While looking after my granddaughter I often had to travel with her in her buggy on the tube. On every occasion when I had to try to carry her and buggy up stairs or onto difficult escalators a total stranger would come forward to help. Every kind of person would come forward to help, particularly young men were the most helpful.

  • I left my handbag on the Underground when I got off at Baker Street on December 22nd. A wonderful man found it and came back to Baker Street with it (making him late for wherever he was going). My son tried phoning the phone in my bag;he answered it and after a bit of running around we connected up. Because of his kindness my Christmas wasn't ruined. Thank you again, whoever you are (and the staff at Baker Street who were so kind to a distaught woman.)

  • When I was 9 and my little sister was 7 we had our first ride on the Tube with my Dad. We were wide-eyed. My dad said "next stop" as we paused at a station, but my sister misunderstood and got off. We watched helpless as the doors slid shut, and the train moved off leaving her behind alone on the platform. When we hopped off at the next stop, dashed across the station and travelled back to the station, she was sitting, unflustered, with two lady travellers. I think of this every time I travel on the Tube though I am nearly 40 now, and hold my children's hands so tight.

  • I had started a new job and hadn't yet been paid. I had recently moved to London and forked out for a deposit and a month's rent. I had no money at all until the next day when I was finally paid. But my train pass ran out and my card got declined. I was nearly crying at the ticket point as I was going to be late for work and I was still on probation. The woman behind the desk put £5 on my card and said that one of my journeys was unresolved so I had probably been charged too much. It tided me over until the next day, payday, and I was so grateful. Her kindness still brings me to the brink of tears today. Thank you!

  • One Christmas eve when I was about three my mum came home with a small bundle of hay. It turns out it had started at the other side of London as a full sized bale. Following bemused looks from other passengers on her District line train she explained that she thought it only sensible to get some for the reindeers for when they landed later that evening. On realisation of my mum's logic and foresight the bale was distributed between other excited parents heading home for Christmas. Smiles (and a bit of a mess) all round the carriage.

  • I was traveling home to Birmingham from North London for Christmas which involved a train and a Tube before heading off from Euston. I had a very heavy suitcase filled with gifts, alcohol and warm clothes. In the rush and excitement of heading home to see my family, I hadn't anticipated how I was going to get my suitcase onto the first train, let alone the Tube and the second train. There were 3 men along the way that helped without question or expectation. One man carried my suitcase from the overland platform at Finsbury Park right down to the Tube, onto the Tube then helped me off at Euston even though he was continuing his journey to work in Vauxhall. I honestly don't know how I would have got down the stairs if he hadn't helped. Re-ignited my faith in our city.

  • Thank you to the young man who offered to carry my suitcase down those steep steps at Earl's Court on 12.01.12, and to the gentleman who carried my suitcase up the steps at King's Cross. Both strangers. It was my lucky day.

  • I was standing in a busy carriage once when a young man of about 8 stood up to let people sit down. No one took him up on the offer. He looked very distressed, until an observant old man, who was seated further down the carriage, stood up and crossed over to accept the invitation. None the wiser, the boy was delighted. So was I.

  • I was returning home after work, the platform was very busy and when we all huddled onto the Tube one of my shoes fell onto the tracks. I felt pretty silly with only one shoe on! A lady on the train saw what had happened and kindly offered me a pair of shoes she had just bought! I was so surprised and grateful.

  • My friend and I were on the way back home from the O2 arena in the early hours of New Year's Day. Even though it was very late, the carriage was still busy because of the free travel and celebrations. The carriage contained quite a metropolitan group of people who were very quiet and trying not to get in each other's way as is the British norm. And suddenly one young lady began asking different people in the carriage how to say "Happy New Year" in their native tongue! Everyone on the carriage would cheer and clap when she got it right and it put a smile on people's faces :)

  • I was standing on the platform edge waiting as my Tube was coming. A girl came walking towards me and slipped and fell. I grabbed her arm to stop her going over the edge. We both picked ourselves up, she was shaken but said thanks and we continued on our journeys. It still shocks me when I think of what nearly happened.

  • I tripped and fell forward into a carriage, cutting my shin on the metal edge, blood flew everywhere. One passenger seized my leg and held it on her knee, others provided wodges of tissues, a man handed over a T shirt to use as a bandage - when we reached the next station, a passenger led me off the train and an ambulance was called. What kindness and efficiency!

  • On my way back to University I left my bag on the Tube at Earl's Court, it contained my purse with my uni halls access card, all my bank cards, my oyster card, phone and keys. I was pretty stuck when I got to Paddington where the staff did their best to phone around to get the trains checked, my friend I was travelling with gave me his Oyster so I could get home to sort out my cards. Eventually I got back to Uni where I had to pay for new keys into my room. Logging onto my computer I found a message on Facebook saying my bag had been found, then a little while later a member of halls staff slipped a note under my door saying my bag had been found. The wonderful lady who had found my bag after it had travelled from Earl's Court to East London had looked through my purse got her son to message me on facebook but also called my University who called my halls so I could get my bag back. It had everything in it. I am so grateful to all involved, the staff at Paddington when I was pieces and the lady and her son in going out of their way. Thank you.

  • Two acts of kindness, concerning TFL staff. A while ago, I left my handbag on a train; it was retrieved by a staff member at Archway Station within minutes. On another occasion, I lost my Senior Travel Pass on a bus to Camden Town. After a call to the Stockwell Garage, the person to whom I spoke returned it by post the following day. Thanks and congratulations to individual TFL Staff!

  • King's Cross Tube: a man coming up the escalator, masses of luggage in black bin liners. At the top, his bags split, saucepans etc rolling noisily all over. We helped pick them up, but he couldn't manage alone. We gave him bags, and I ran for a trolley, walked him to the main station, found his train, helped load his luggage, asked someone to tell him where to get off, and wished him luck. He was from Senegal and looked lost, anxious and alone. i wanted to make him feel welcome here.

  • A long journey on the Northern line. Tiredness on my face and wind-blown grey hair. Schoolboys: nine, ten, a baker's dozen. Noisy, pushing, shouting, rude. And then Two stand up and smile at me, such sweet schoolboy smiles. They gesture: please, sit here I smile, I sit, my outlook transformed

  • I lost my gloves on the Central line. A good three months later I was about to get off the Tube at Mile End and a passenger said, "I think these are yours?". They were mine and they were/are special gloves to me. As I was getting off I only had a second to say, "Thank You". I have not seen him since, but he had taken those gloves on to the Tube every day for 3 months hoping to reunite them with me. A true act of kindness that I still say a BIG THANK YOU for.

  • Coming back from Heathrow, helpful people asssisted with my suitcase and gave me their seats, at both changes of line. Another young man carried my suitcase up the stairs at Leyton. Wow! What a super homecoming!

  • I was on the way to a party where you had to be smartly dressed when I realised my shoes were dirty. I was frantically trying to brush them clean with my hand and noticed the woman opposite me rummaging in her bag. She whipped out a brand new suede brush and asked "could this be what you need?". It was exactly the thing. I walked off the Tube with clean shoes and a big smile! I wonder what else she had in her Mary Poppins bag!

  • My boyfriend Jonathan found a mobile phone on the platform of Hammersmith Underground station. He then spent his Tube journey looking through the numbers saved on the phone until he found 'Home'. He rang this Home number and spoke to Ned who had lost the phone, he arranged for Ned to pick it up from the Porter of his block of flats. Ned left a thank you note and twenty pounds for Jonthan when he picked up the phone. Plus Jonathan is now on Ned's family Christmas card list!

  • I was travelling home after not having a particularly good day and I must have looked upset because a young couple sitting next to me offered me a bit of chocolate which I accepted and said thank you very much!

  • I was in a rush so I was almost running to the train when I lost my keys in the Tube station this morning. A young man chased me through the whole Angel Tube station to give me back my keys. Thank you very much!

  • I was on the Tube crying a lot, and trying not to. Hiding unsuccessfully behind my scarf. Someone gave me a superdrug receipt. I want to send a picture of it to you. On it it said: Things will get better. Just like how good things don't last bad things don't last either. I HOPE YOUR DAY GETS BETTER. It helped but made me cry a lot more too at the time. It was like someone holding your hand for a brief moment.

  • Coming out from the tunnel on the Central line from Gants Hill my baby cousin started getting quite scared as it got quite busy, and the train had to be held. Before she threw a tantrum I sat her on my lap, took from my bag a pair of drum sticks she started to drum my lap while I sang The Who's Baby o'Reily. Next thing you know the man next to me joined in, and across us a elderly couple started to sing. My cousin giggled with delight and everyone who first seemed stressed out were now gleaming and making requests. We ended up having a joyous sing song which made the train move. I'm sure the driver was humming along over the tanoy. My baby cousin then gave us a band name 'Train Track'. Hopefully we will have another appearance.

  • An old man boarded a busy Tube and I stood up to give him my seat. "How nice it is that the young look out for the elderly" he said. "It's got nothing to do with your age," I replied, "its because you look like you've lunched rather well!" He'd been drinking. I was a student, he was editor of Reuters. We exchanged cards. He wrote about the experience in The London Review of Books whilst discussing The American Guide to Modern Manners and posted it to me to say thanks. 10 years later he spoke at my wedding. 15 years later my son's middle name is that of his. He was called David Chipp. My son's name is Rupert Chipp Trewby. He passed away a year before my son was born. http://flickr.com/gp/trewby/8JF126/

  • I was getting on a train at Finsbury Park when a couple with two young children and two huge suitcases plus extra bags struggled on after me. I and another passenger were hovering ready to help with bags when the husband dropped something near the door. A woman sitting next to the door moved and told a teenager to move so they could sit down. Later that day two men on two separate occasions offered me their seats.

  • My wife was taking the afternoon off, resting at home.I was standing on a crowded Jubilee line Tube train holding my 10 month old son when an elderly gentleman stood up and offered me his seat. I have often done the same thing,in this situation for a lady but this was the first time it had happened to me. An odd but most welcome experience !

  • I was travelling to work one day with my trusty clarinet which has been my constant companion for twenty-four years. I am a professional musician so when I left it on the Tube it felt like I'd lost one of my best friends and not just an instrument. Luckily, the man sitting next to me noticed and chased me off the train with it. Unfortunately, I was oblivious and immediately jumped on another Tube, the doors shutting as he tried to reach me. He left it in the station office and after a tearful day we were reunited. I don't think he'll ever know quite how grateful I was to him!

  • I was having an awful day, missed Tubes and trains and buses, trying to get to a relative's house because it was too late to make it home. There was a beautiful boy opposite me on the Tube, I probably creeped him out by staring too unsubtly, but he saw me getting angry with my broken phone and let me borrow his, and jumped up to hand me my wallet when I left it on the seat as I jumped off the Tube ... his smile and actions calmed me down more than anything. Thank you.

  • When me and my best friend use the Underground, we take a bag of Percy Pigs and give them out to passangers. It's great to see them smile and often ends in a discussion on how best to eat them! It makes our day :)

  • My cousin left her Oyster card at home and didn't have enough money to pay for the train home at Seven Sisters station. A woman bought her a travel card from the station and gave it to her with a Merry Christmas.

  • I spotted a lady on the ground. A young man appeared. "We shall use this!" he said and banged on the emergency button. "So sorry" said the lady "I overdid it at the office Christmas lunch." Don't worry at all", said the young man "Help is on it's way!" A lady and gentleman appeared pushing a wheel chair. The lady was loaded into it and the young man disappeared into the crowd.

  • I had a very heavy suitcase getting back from Christmas and was feeling sad after leaving my family. A kind man offered to carry my suitcase up the stairs from the Bakerloo line at Elephant and Castle, which made me so happy, but what's more he waited for me to cross the bridge and carried my suitcase up and down three more flights of stairs to get me to the shopping centre and onto the bus.

  • I suffered an epileptic seizure on the Tube and a very kind man helped me, called the paramedics and waited with me on Turnham Green station until they arrived and I started to come round. He obviously broke his journey for me and I still wasn't fully compus mentus to say thank you, so I do hope he reads this and knows that I am very grateful.

  • I was with my 3 year old daughter, and also my son in a pushchair. We were going down an escalator in a Tube station, and I went on with the pushchair but my daughter suddenly got nervous and let go of my hand. I had to continue down, but she was left behind at the top crying out "mummy, mummy". A stranger ran back up the escalator, and while I watched, escorted my daughter down with her to meet me at the bottom. I am very thankful for her quick thinking.

  • I left my diary on the Tube and hadn't put my own contact details in it so I thought that was the last time I would ever see it. But a kind man picked it up and rang through the phone numbers of friends and family I had listed in the back to track me down and get it back to me.

  • Green Park: walking down the long tunnel between the Piccadilly and Victoria. Stressed and tired, I passed out. I came round to friendly faces, was taken to the station office. Staff gave me sweet tea and I called my GP. A staff member escorted me to Euston: "this girl's fainted, let her sit down." She bought me a Crunchie and took me to my train.

  • It was a warm day and I was on my way to the airport to surprise my mum in Crete for her birthday. At the Tube station there was no lift down to the platform but the guard offered to carry my suitcase down the stairs for me. I was so grateful and touched by his gesture.

  • I was travelling to hospital with a prolapsed disc in my spine. I was in agony and on a lot of medication. The gentleman opposite sat with me for the entire journey, staying on beyond his stop. He escorted me up to street level, allowing me to lean on him all the way. He asked that station staff look after me until my boyfriend arrived. That, for me, was the utmost kindness.
  • I had fallen asleep on my friend's shoulder on the Tube, and my friends only just realised we were at the stop in time to get off, so I stood up a second behind them. As they jumped off, another friend realised one of us had dropped their gloves. I went to pick them up, and the tube doors closed. I'd never travelled on the Tube before, and, half-asleep, tried to look for a way to open the doors, with the rest of my friends gesturing at me from the platform! A very kind woman saw, and came over to check I was okay and to tell me to get off at the next stop. I was fine, but it was really sweet of her. She waved and smiled at me when I eventually got off.

  • A little girl in a buggy dropped her teddy bear onto the platform when the train was stopped at bank station and started to cry. A woman who had just disembarked stopped and gave it back to her. The doors closed just as the girl gave the teddy an enormous hug and the woman an enormous smile.

  • We've all driven a train before. When I was 5 years old I used to drive the train, I'd sit infront of the DLR with my brother, run to the front and we'd swirve in our seats whistling and yell 'doors are closing' pressing the bolts on the seats as if it was a button to move the train. We waved goodbye to the other passangers they'd smile and thank us for a lovely journey. Now I'm 20, and other younger children are doing the same thing. Reinventing that magical journey. Sometimes asking for my oyster card and fining me for sweets if it didn't beep on their hand. The cheek of it :)

  • I was on my way to uni one morning, and I'd been dealing with relationship problems so I hadn't eaten since the previous afternoon due to anxiety. When I got on the train I immediately felt ill, but I tried to compose myself. Regardless, a few stops later I felt myself starting to faint, and slumped to the floor of the carriage. This in turn sent me into a panic attack. Thank god for the two women who stood me by the open window at the end of the carriage, massaged my immobile clenched hands (I was also hyperventilating), and then helped me off the train. I'm especially grateful to one woman in particular, who stayed with me, made sure I got water, and accompanied me to my line change; and another random passerby who gave me her banana. I was so touched by all the kindness shown to me by complete strangers, as well as the Underground members of staff, and I'll never forget it.

  • A severe coughing fit on the district line from Richmond left me gasping till two kind ladies opposite came to my aid with water and tissues. And the gentleman next to me helped to open the water bottle and made sure I was OK. I felt cared for. Thank you.

  • In December 1993 my 5 year old daughter rushed onto a Tube train ahead of me and before I could follow her with my other child the doors closed and the train pulled out of the station as I ran alongside banging on the doors in a panic. I caught the next train and got off at the next stop to find my little girl being consoled by a group of young teenagers en route to a concert who had got off the train to stay with her until I found her. They had to dash off to get to the show and I think I was crying too much to thank them properly, so I welcome this opportunity to say THANK YOU, THANK YOU so much !

  • While I was in London I finished my book 'A girl with a Dragon Tattoo' so I decided to leave in on the Tube with my e-mail address inside and a note to say ' I hope you enjoy my book' this is the e-mail I received: Hi there! My name is Craig and I found your book a little while ago at Hyde Park corner station. I'm about a quarter way through the book and I am enjoying it! Whether you left the book at the station intentionally or by accident, I just want to say thanks! I've always wanted to read this book! Do let me know if you want it back and I'll gladly send it to you! :)

  • I'm from Liverpool and just started working in London and having had knee surgery was wary getting the train and Tube on crutches. I'd heard all the stories about rude and inconsiderate London commuters. So I was hugely surprised that I got offered a seat every day on both the Overland train and the Tube. I think sometimes people just need the opportunity to be kind.

  • One night, as I was returning home through London Bridge, I saw a guy stumbling towards the platform edge. He sat down and was about to walk off into the middle of the tracks. Without saying anything, I and another man walked forward, lifted him under the arms, and deposited him by the wall, where he stayed until a train arrived. What I remember most was that when we lifted him he weighed nothing. I never said anything to the other man, but I wondered if he was as affected by the incident as I was - thinking that we had probably saved someone's life.

  • A very simple story. When I got up to leave the Tube, my mobile phone fell out of my pocket onto the seat. I did not see it. A foreign woman tapped me on the arm,smiled and handed the phone back to me. My whole life was on that phone, and if she had not bothered to return it, I would have had the freak out to end all freaks outs! Would you always return something valuable?...

  • I was taking my grandchildren from Liverpool Street by Tube, we were going to watch the street performers at Covent Garden. Leo aged 2 was in the buggy and Laura is 6. The escalators and trains would have been hard work alone except for the help I got from kind strangers. People young and old from all over the world and Londoners helped me with the buggy, it was a heart-warming experience. Visualise a whole chain of people from London and around the world passing that buggy along from Liverpool Street to Covent Garden!

  • Less than 24 hours earlier, I'd learnt that my 20 year old cousin had died whilst backpacking around Asia. Travelling to work next morning, slow, heavy tears were tracing down my face, and a stranger seated opposite wordlessly passed me a tissue.

  • I had just moved to England, 4 years ago and I was still trying to find a job, going to interviews daily, changing trains and tubes 3-4 times every time. Over the weekend I decided to visit my cousin and prepared a small bag to take with me which under all that pressure, I forgot on the train! After a few days I got an email saying that my bag was found and handed over the the x-station which I can't remember now. When I contacted the station no-one seemed to know anything about my bag. i spent a couple of months trying to track down the bag and i couldn't, so i decided to email back , thinking it was someone from the station who had contacted me. I was stunned when they replied saying that there were only traveling with me and saw the bag and handed it to Victoria station. I had my email on the bag and they thought to email me letting me know that the bag was found! I went to Victoria station and found it, I was so thrilled and grateful, back home my bag would have been disappeared in a second!

  • Rush hour at St Pancras and I was walking fast with my coffee in hand when I saw a gentleman, around 60, hold his chest in pain and pass out on the floor. Staff members ran at him and so did I. Tried to make him comfortable and be sure that he breathes. We called an ambulance and they were on their way. The man started coming around but faintly. I stayed there keeping him company till someone arrived and kept repeating that everything is gonna be alright. eventually he felt better and he managed to smile and whisper thank you. I'd like to think that i gave him strength to hang on...

  • I was coming back home from work early as I was feeling very unwell. I was upset at having to leave other people to do my job and very tired. I couldn't stop crying. As I switched at Euston, a man came up and said he had seen me crying all the way from Pimlico and asked if I was alright. He gave me a pack of tissues and tried to cheer me up while we waited for the Tube. I was overwhelmed by his kindness. I've never experienced anything like that in years of travelling on the Tube. It was so comforting.

  • My leaking dinner announced itself as it dribbled through the bottom of my bag as I stepped onto the platform at KX. Hopping onto the Tube, I realised that in my mustard frenzy I had dropped my glove. A heroic stranger spotted it on the platform. The whole carriage turned to watch a she placed herself between the doors, just a moment too late. Through the window a man picked it up, waved it at us, and placed it on a bench with a gently amused smile. For a moment it appeared that the whole carriage cared about the fate of my glove. 2 hours later, we returned. We'll leave the ending up to you.

  • A Sliding Doors moment. I saw the most beautiful girl on a crowded commuter train and she got off at the same station as me, Holborn. In the carriage I'd been reading a biography of Chekhov and had just read the words "whatever you would do, do it, for in boldness are magic and genius". I knew I'd forever regret it if I didn't speak to her and finally plucked up the courage on the escalator. In her kindness she replied. Six months later we got married. We've now been married for 14 years and have 4 children.

  • One time I was really cold, about 4 years ago when I first came to London, a TFL personnel gave me his TFL blazer jacket. I'm pretty sure it's not strictly allowed but it's an act of kindness so strong I still remember all these years later. Thank you. You have some special people working for you with a good heart.

  • Travelling home one night I heard a boy coughing violently. Suddenly, the coughing stopped and the carriage was quiet. He'd stopped coughing and was silently choking. I ran over, put my arms around him and gave him the Heimlich manoeuvre. Nothing happened. I tried again and thankfully he vomited all over the train floor and my shoes. His mother thanked me profusely. It wasn't until I got home that I realised I'd saved his life. I hope he's OK.

  • I offered to help a blind man with the walk towards the Circle line. We had a great chat and I asked which direction on the Circle line he was going. Widdershins, he said, kindly reminding me of this brilliant word I had basically forgotten. I remember him, the walk, the chat and the word fondly.

  • I lost my purse and a fellow-passenger, hearing me telephone my husband to inform him of this, arranged and paid for my taxi home from the station. And that was just the first act of kindness. A couple of days later, I got a telephone call from my college - an unknown stranger had found my purse, taken it to an office where he was due at a meeting, and a secretary there went through the items and found my student card and thus the college number,so that my purse could be returned. When I went to collect it, she was just delighted and happy to have been of help. I'm only sorry that the chap who found the purse didn't leave his name. Every item, including some £10 in cash, plus cheque card etc was in the purse. There is more honesty and kindness around than we sometimes think.

  • My son and I were travelling on the Tube when 2 young girls got on the busy train. My son who was 14 yrs old at the time got up and offered his seat to the girls. One of the girls thanked him sat down and the other girl started writing something on paper.When we arrived at our station the girl handed the note to my son. As we stepped onto the platform we read the note. It said 'I had just prayed someone would offer my friend a seat because she has MS and cannot cope standing for too long. Thank you'

  • During rush hour, I balanced uncertainly on two crutches at the top of the escalators leading down into Liverpool Street station. Although I had previously cursed their slow speed, the escalators now seemed to move at breakneck pace, leading me to wonder how I would ever get onto them without tripping and falling. A city worker came up to me to offer help, taking my elbow and guiding me onto the step. "Are you going to be ok to get off at the bottom?" he asked. Not wanting to be more of a burden and knowing he probably just wanted to get straight on his train, I said no and he carried on down the stairs. When I reached the bottom he was there waiting "It's been raining. I was worried, and didn't want you to slip" he explained as he helped me hop off the stairs. What a gentleman.

  • I was reading on a very crowded Tube one morning when the woman next to me grabbed my book and hit me on the head with it! She'd seen a big insect about to sting me and got it before it got me.

  • I was on the blue line to Pimlico in the morning and was late for something I had to do there. I had bought a coffee and a cupcake as a sugary breakfast and was hurriedly trying to eat the cupcake without spilling crumbs on everybody and holding the coffee between my knees. The Tube jerked suddenly and my knees squished the paper cup causing a geyser of hot liquid to spill all over me and the surrounding area. Pretty much every person on the tube pulled tissues out of their bags smiling and handed them to me - very sweet, and weren't angry that my coffee had splashed their shoes.

  • I saw a woman on a bench with woollen threads everywhere, entangled all around the platform seating. Asking how she had achieved this, she explained her box tipped over as she sat down. I let all trains pass for the next 20 minutes and helped untangle the wool thread by thread. It was worth it: we connected, we laughed.

  • It was late, around 10 in the evening and the train was filled with people that were going home from parties. A lot of people were wearing fancy dress because it was around the Halloween period. A group of teenage girls were there and one of them started to sing and dance, before we knew it, all the other girls were singing and dancing to the same rhythm. The whole train was in awe and for a brief second, it felt like we were all united. That for me is definitely an act of kindness.

  • Once, I was on the Tube travelling back from my friends' house in Clapham. An Aussie guy got up and made everyone play musical chairs - every stop for about 10 stops, it was still going when I had to get off. Some of us were very English and reserved at first, then politely amused, but in the end he got us all joining in. Still makes me smile to remember it.

  • It's pouring with rain and a soaked man in a dark coat gets on the train, dripping. At the next stop, a woman and two children get off the train, first giving the man an umbrella.

  • One Saturday night in September, five friends and I were travelling on the Piccaddilly line to a party in King's Cross when a striking young Texan guy boarded the train at Holborn. He was wearing a Stetson, leather belt and cowboy boots - the real McCoy. After striking up a conversation we found out he had just arrived in London for a 3 month placement & didn't know anyone in the city. Much to the hilarity & encouragement of the carriage, we convinced him to get off with us and join our party for the night. We partied until 3am with him, discovering more about his life on his family's ranch and settled him nicely (we hope!) into London life. We bid our farewells and booked a cab for him back to his hotel. YeeeHah!

  • I came down with food poisoning and was violently sick (in a bag) on the platform at Highbury and Islington. It was so embarrassing and I didn't know how I would get out of the station as I felt so weak. An angel of a lady stopped, made me laugh and helped me up the stairs with my heavy suitcase.

  • People are so kind we must not forget this. I experience something new every day. This site helps me to share my blogs with you so THANK YOU. Yesterday a kind gentleman wearing a Shrewsbury sweat top offered me his seat. He then managed to sit opposite me and another lady appeared to be standing opposite him he then offered his seat to her, he did this to all the ladies Old/Young/pregnant etc and then made conversation with everyone too. What a nice nice man. He seemed so happy with life and proud of his Shrewsbury football team. Good happy people are around not abusive ignorant humans we just got to share our good stories to know that they are out there.

  • I want to thank a very pretty lady who offered her seat for my mother on our way to Euston from Oxford Circus. We sometimes forget other people around us on our daily journeys but a small act of kindness like that makes you want to extend the kindness back where you can.

  • Late one night I got on a Tube to find a large drunk man generally annoying 2 young ladies, after a while they looked really uncomfortable so I asked him to leave them be. Thankfully his attention then turned to me and we all sat there chuckling as he threw his drunk words of abuse at me & left the girls alone, I'm not easily offended luckily.

  • I had just given blood and was sat on the Victoria line platform at Oxford Circus when I started feeling very faint, I thought I was going to pass out so turned to the lady next to me to tell her I'd given blood and felt unwell. She was amazing and took charge making me remove my jacket and sit with my head between my knees. She then stayed with me, missing several trains herself, until I was able to stand and accompanied me to my destination.

  • My wife was heavily pregnant but the Tube train was packed with commuters when we got on. We looked around but no-one gave up their seat. Then a guy in the corner, worn-out clothes, dirty-looking, unshaven and clutching a can of lager lurched to his feet and slurred loudly "ere y'are luv". My abiding memory is of the ashamed faces of the besuited respectable commuters as my wife gratefully took her seat so kindly offered to her.

  • I was on the Northern line and when I got up to get off the Tube, my Oyster card had fallen out of my pocket. I was unaware of this but this guy was running behind me shouting for me to stop, I had my headphones in so couldn't hear him. He finally caught me and gave me my Oyster card! He then missed his train that he had got off to run after me to give me my Oyster card back! I was so grateful to him.

  • Up at 05:45 in preparation for my long journey, first a trek to the bus stop, then two Tubes followed by another bus journey, and I would be at school. The only difference between today and any other, my alarm didn't go off. As quickly as I had changed I was out my front door legging it to my first bus stop - oyster in hand off we go. Little did I know that would be the last journey on my Oyster as I had run out of credit and my wallet was on my bedside table. After hysterically crying in the middle of the station due to the thought of my form sat in their classroom without me, a guardian angel came to my rescue, topped up my Oyster card and gave me some money for lunch! I didn't know such acts of kindness still existed!

  • I sat across from a very attractive lady who was wearing the shortest skirt. I glanced at her a few times thinking to myself wow you have got confidence especially in rush hour. All the city boys were also staring but she picked me out and asked me "if i had a problem and why I kept staring at her". I was stunned especially as every guy was looking at her but she picked a young women. I told her the truth and said she looked extremely classy and I adored her confidence. She was stunned at my response and said thank you and apologised to me for being so aggressive. Well all eyes were on me now. Who had the last laugh? Motto, always be kind and think before you respond as everybody is stressed on the Tube.

  • My parents and I got on at Chancery Lane late in the evening after going to the theatre. My Dad sat next to a tall, well-built and heavily tattooed man. Opposite me was a man wearing large blue headphones who was sat next to an elderly German couple. Six quite merry women and two men joined us at Liverpool Street. They were loud and enjoying themselves. I shouldn't have judged the man sitting beside my Dad but I was suprised when our new arrivals had sparked an enthusiastic conversation between the two men. It turned out that the man was a bouncer on the way to work. The German couple had kindly moved up a seat so that one of the women could sit down. At that point, I smiled to the man sitting opposite me and felt so happy when he smiled back. Sometimes acts of kindness are not the major things that happen in life, but appreciating people and the small things inbetween.

  • There was a girl crying a few seats away from me. I moved to sit next to her and asked her what was wrong, she told me she was probably going to miss the train to see her boyfriend and that would cause some other problems, so I didn't pry, and I sat with her for the rest of her journey and just chatted to her politely, and by the time she got off, she was smiling and laughing.

  • On 25th November I was getting on a Southbound Northern line train at London Bridge at 9.40am when a member of the London Underground staff met a gentleman, with a white stick, off the train with a cheerful message saying he was a member of staff. I was not the only person who was moved and enhanced. Difficult to convey how life enhancing this was, but thank you to the kind London Underground man.

  • My husband and I were trying to top up our Oyster Cards without success. A young girl behind us asked if we needed help. She tried the machine next to the one we'd been using and did them both immediately.(The one we'd been using wasn't working.) She was obviously in a hurry and it was very kind of her to take the time to help us.

  • A girl in her 20s gets on the Tube and sits down, bursting into tears. The woman next to her gets out her packet of tissues and gives her one. When the train arrives at the woman's stop, she puts a hand on the girl's shoulder and they smile at each other - unspoken compassion and gratitude.

  • I was going through a hard time at work, and was going through a bit of an absent-minded period. I was at Old Street station and left my purse on one of the benches at the station. When I realised what I had done I tried to get the Tube back to find it, but it was gone. Thinking it would never come back, I went back home, only to find a Facebook message from a girl saying she had picked it up and found me (from my unique Sri Lankan surname)! We met up at Farringdon station, and she handed it over and I gave her some chocolates to say thank you. It was a nice ending at a bad time.

  • I had just arrived in London with a backpack, suitcase and two small bags, and still new to the Tube in peak hour, without much of an idea about where I was going. A very kind gentleman saw the distress on my face and instead of going to his connecting train he asked me if I needed help, he not only carried my suitcase up the stairs but took me directly to my platform to catch the next train. A perfect start to my new life in London.

  • A man in blue flannelette, skinny jeans and white sneakers offered everyone around him a piece of chewing gum and with a smile said 'there's nothing worse than bad breath'. Subsequently, I noticed others on the Tube to smile pay further acts of kindness to their fellow commuters. A young girl with red lips tried to catch me when the Tube came to an abrupt halt and a two suited gentleman gave way when the doors opened saying 'after you'.

  • Was on the Victoria line this morning heading to my office in knighbtridge and I lost my wallet containing £500. And my bank cards. I was to use the money to pay for the balance of my outstanding school fees. I was really upset. To my surprise I received a call from security in my office that I had a visitor, the visitor was an elderly couple who used my work Identification card to trace where I worked to return my wallet back with all the money and bank cards still inside. I thanked them and took their details to keep in touch with them.

  • Heading down into the Tube on a busy escalator, I noticed a bit of a commotion as I neared the bottom and a slight sense of panic as something was blocking the way of people trying to step off the escalator. There wasn't much space as the area at the bottom of the escalator started to crowd with people and as I got to the end, I could see a woman trying to pull her young son off the escalator and her son inexplicably unable to move. I looked down as I approached and noticed that the end of his shoe lace was stuck between the grooves of the metal steps and the teeth that cover the gap where the steps roll away. As I passed, I swept down and yanked the shoe lace out, causing the boy and his mother to topple slightly, but no-one fell, everyone moved forward and we all went on our way. I like to think I averted a crush.

  • I was standing on a packed train a few years ago now, and remember feeling faint. Before I knew it my vision was fading and I could feel myself falling against the glass panel next to the seats, but had no control. I suddenly felt someone grab my wrist and say "Don't worry, it's ok, I've got you." A man kindly let me sit down. I was so shocked, scared and embarrassed that I just sat down looking at the floor. I never got to thank the lady that so kindly helped me. So if you're out there, thank you! I shall never forget.

  • It was lunchtime but I had no time for lunch so I ate a banana on my way to see a client. As I sat on the Tube holding my banana skin a lovely young man asked if I would like him to take it as he was getting off. I gratefully accepted.

  • I ruptured my achiles tendon and was in plaster cast up to the thigh for 8 weeks after my surgery. The Tube network is actually a really daunting, and scary thing to use when you're on one leg and getting to grips with crutches. Especially the escalators! At Paddington station, on my way to work, one of the station attendants could obviously see I was uneasy about using the escalator for the first time. He stopped everyone coming on, stood in front of me and helped me on. He then stopped people from passing me and helped me off too. I thought this would be a one-off, but the next day (and all the other days he was there!) he did the same thing. It became quite the routine! I then took time off and didn't use the network until I was better. I think I should have bought him a gift or something! Maybe he'll see this and remember me. Thanks!!!

  • A guy with a beer bottle, in the carriage being abusive. Everyone uneasy, but pretending to ignore him. Then a man sat down by the guy. He was calm and non-judgemental. He asked the guy about himself and then, confronting the truth, commented that the guy seemed to enjoy making everyone uncomfortable. And a bit later he told the guy that there was help for alcohol problems if he wanted it. The guy didn't object at all, all the aggression had stopped. A two minute conversation. A skilled, compassionate man. Demonstrating kindness to us all.

  • No sooner had I sat down on a packed rush-hour train than I got a nose bleed. Rummaging through my handbag proved futile and blood kept flowing, mopped-up with just one scrap of tissue. I asked a couple of people but no one could help. Then two sparkly eyes from behind a burka offered me an unopened packet of tissues.

  • It was during the morning rush-hour that the mash of bodies parted. As they did, a man fell backward into the doors. The crowd around him remained powerless. He'd fainted. His friend tried to help him up, but he couldn't on his own. Feeling awful at watching them, I helped carry the man off the train and prop him against the station wall. The three of us remained there until he regained himself, taking the time to watch the crowded trains fly past. In that moment, it didn't feel like rush hour.

  • Whilst on the platform waiting for our train my daughter aged 6 burnt her mouth on her not yet cooled down take-away hot chocolate. She cried while I searched my bag for some water to cool her mouth, not finding any and feeling like a bit of a useless mummy for allowing it to happen and not having any water. A woman approached us and handed me an opened bottle of water, my daughter very gratefully cooled her mouth and stopped crying. My words of thanks seemed unable to quite convey just how grateful I was for her act of kindness. Gestures like this restore my faith in my fellow humans.

  • This is funny but it was nice....I got Piccadilly line today I'm chubby girl and the train was fully packed so I went in the middle ...this lady looked at me I looked back, she was reading, then again she looked and she asked me do you want seat? I started to laugh. I said I was fine to that lady! Then a man did the same I took the seat & I didnt realise that the woman was still in the Tube, she was starring at me... But I was not carrying that's why I didn't take seat from her... She must have thought I was rude... Thanks to her!!! Happy days.

  • This morning I reached the platform as the train should have pulled away but the driver saw me and waited until I struggled on with heavy bags. It reminded me how lucky I am to be taken to work every single morning by a stranger, to be able to sit and read the paper and not to have to use a car. So thank you to this morning's and every other driver who's taken me across this city.

  • A little boy was sitting in a seat at the end of one of the rows of seats on the tube, with his Dad opposite him. The last empty seat in the carriage was the one next to the little boy, and I sat in it, but the little boy looked a bit nervous when a stranger sat next to him, so I jumped out of the seat, and the Dad and I smiled at each other. The Dad came and sat next to his son, who then leant on him and fell asleep. When they got to their stop, the Dad picked up his son, who was about 2 or 3, and who was still asleep, and carried him off the train. As they were getting off and walking up the platform, the little boy was stirring, looking back over his Dad's shoulder through sleepy, half-open eyes, and holding his hand out towards where they had been sitting, with a scared, sad, and slightly panicked look on his face. I looked down and saw there was a small toy on the seat where he had been. The doors were just about the close, so I grabbed the toy and ran off the train just before they shut, and put the toy back in the little boy's outstretched hand. He smiled sleepily but happily and looked relieved. His Dad turned round also looking very relieved, and gave me a look which said, "phew, that was close, that would have caused a lot of distress". He said thanks and they went.

  • This morning I decided to wear my favourite fluffy winter hat that I really love. I had to change on the Northern line at Kennington from the Bank branch to the Charing Cross branch, and as I stepped onto the Tube, a man hopped on and tapped me on the shoulder and passed me my hat, and then hopped back off at ran back to the other platform but the Bank branch train had now left. He had hopped off his own Tube to give me my hat back. So thankful, how kind!

  • Very soon after the London bombings in 2005, I was on board a busy carriage when we were stopped in a tunnel. An eerie silence came over everyone and we were all silently fearful in unison. From the far side of the carriage a man started to whistle the dambusters theme. A few people giggled, then more began to laugh and soon after a chorus of people joined in. We soon began moving again and immediately normality returned and we went back to being strangers. I'll never forget that Tube journey and the way we lifted each others spirits

  • I am submitting this story on behalf of my friend; I think it's beautiful and perfect for your project. I am sure she will give her permission and more details! My friend Harriet was waiting for the Tube. She saw a man standing away from the crowd and close to the edge of the platform. She felt his despair and moved towards him and put her arms around him as the train approached. No one knows what was going through his mind at that moment, but I think her extension towards another is a true act of kindness.

  • I fell asleep on the last Tube home, missed my stop and ended up in the middle of Essex in the middle of the night. A sweet man from Bangladesh walked me to a bus-stop and waited with me until a nightbus turned up that would take me back into London. He told me he missed his mum but he liked London. I was really touched by his gentlemanly kindness as I would have been terrified and lost without him.

  • After the gym, I was in a hot rush to get home. I was on the Northern line from Borough to South Wimbledon and nearest the door. Every time the doors would open, I would leave my gym bag and step off the train to let others off. At Clapham South, I stepped off and the doors shut. Not allowing anyone off and my bag inside (including my keys, wallet and phone). It began to leave the platform. I ran up to the technician's room to report what happened. After 20 minute of tears and panic, a kind (and very handsome) gentleman came up the escalator with my bag. He had made it all the way to his station (Colliers Wood if I remember correct) and saw my bag. Noting the commotion at Clapham South he picked it up and turned around to return it. It was the nicest thing anyone has done for me in London (a Canadian native)...I just wish I asked him out on a date!

  • When I was younger travelling down to London from Newcastle on the Tube to see my then boy, my phone had ran out of battery. I was on the District line at 12.30, the last Tube running for the evening, I had no idea which stop to get off and it was a freezing December evening. I had no other way of getting in touch with anyone - and was getting very anxious. The girl opposite must have sensed my fear as she offered for me to use her phone and put my sim card in. She stayed on a stop longer until I had contacted my friend and arranged where to meet. What an angel she was!

  • This is for the nice girl I met briefly in the ticket queue at Tottenham Court Road station the other day. I mistakenly pushed in in front of you and apologised. We wanted to say something to each other, but there was so little time. Your smile as you walked away lit a spark in me and I wish I'd gone after you. I tried to catch you up, but you must have gone the other way. Thank you for brightening my day!

  • When I sat down on the Tube I realised the soup I had brought for my lunch in my bag had exploded inside. People offered me newspapers, plastic bags and even a whole pack of fresh tissues to help clean up the mess without me even asking. By the end of my journey by bag was clean and usuable!

  • As I leapt through the closing train doors at Finsbury Park, my leg was caught and one shoe fell off onto the platform. I sat down, one shoe missing, as the train pulled away. 'I've just bought these,' said a woman opposite, opening a Russell & Bromley bag. 'See if they fit.' They were perfect. The woman gave me her address so I could return to her her brand new shoes. Which, of course, I did.

  • When making my journey home on the Piccadilly line train, I suddenly felt very unwell and fainted. When I woke up, a woman helped me sit up and when I felt up to it several people on the train helped me stand and made sure I felt better. I dropped several things which I didn't notice and they each picked up everything and handed them back safely to me. When the next stop arrived a young man made sure I got a seat on the platform to rest while another asked if I would like him to call someone to get help. I felt so much better just because of how caring and nice everyone was despite it being rush hour and very busy on the train. While I rested on the platform bench, another person who saw the others helping me before the train left offered me a chocolate bar. It really shows how considerate people can be on the Tube despite not knowing each other and I'm so grateful to all the people who helped me.

  • Saturday night Tube jammed with punk rockers and euphoric football fans. I slide on and tap my foot nervously to my music, five foot nothing amidst the giants. One leans down and asks me what I'm listening to. I tell him, he smiles, we swap headphones. He likes my band, and I bop along to his. When I slip off at my stop, he and all his friends wave to me as the Tube disappears into the darkness. My big friendly giants.

  • Getting on the escalator at Archway for the first after I broke my ankle seemed impossible. I finally found the courage to do it, half way up I saw a station guard was on the down escalator opposite me. Some kindly people had told him I was struggling and he was on his way to help me.

  • My stop arrived I stood up and was one step out of the door. Then I felt a light tap on my left shoulder, I turned around to see a man handing me my oyster card which I had dropped as I was stood from my seat.

  • I was trying to get home from work in time for my 2 year old daughter's bedtime, but had to let three trains go by as they were too crowded for me to get on. When the fourth one came, it was packed with people. I called into the carriage 'please can people move up, I'm desperate to get home in time to see my daughter tonight' and as if by magic, a space opened up. I got on and strangers smiled at me. Magic.

  • My Mum doesn't work for London Underground but she always carries some spare copies of the Tube Map in her handbag for when people occasionally stop her and ask for advice or when she sees someone looking lost. That way she can leave them with the map after she's helped them to find where they need to go. I always thought it was a really nice thing to do and I was even more impressed last year when she extended her kindness to a first time visitor to London on a flight from Rome to Gatwick. After asking her to which station the Gatwick Express would take him, Mum pulled out a copy of the Tube Map, answered his questions and then gave him the copy to keep for the rest of his stay. He was really thankful for her help and I was really proud of her act of kindness.

  • Thinking I was fitter and stronger than I actually am, I decided to carry two large PC towers on the Tube in an Ikea bag from Canary Wharf to St James's Park last week rather than get a taxi. Step-free access meant I was fine changing lines at Westminster but I realised my error when I stepped off the train onto the platform of St James's Park station where there wasn't a lift in sight. Shuffling along the platform towards the staircase was a monumental effort and I even made it up a couple of steps before two off-duty policemen stopped and deftly took one handle each and carried the heavy bag up the remaining steps, through the gateline and all the way to the lift in my office. They made my day and I hope they heard my out-of-breath thank you.

  • I was on the Jubilee Line from Waterloo. I was trying not to cry. As the train pulled into the next station the man sitting opposite me stood to leave then he passed me a scrap of folded paper. It read: "I hope everything gets better for you". And I thanked him silently the whole way home.

  • I once saw a man making paper boats on the Tube. Next to him a little girl was looking at him in awe. He made one boat after another and placed them carefully next to him. As he was about to leave, he turned to the little girl and with a big smile gave her all his boats.

  • The down escalator wasn't working at Highgate station. A lot of people were rushing past an elderly woman who was struggling down the stairs with her bag. One young woman as she came past, offered to help carry the bag to the bottom of the stairs. The older lady accepted. Without her bag, she almost skipped to the bottom of the stairs.

  • As the doors were closing at Shepherd's Bush I saw a lady dash to get off. In her haste, she managed to leave her purse on the seat. In a flash another chap shouted, then grabbed the purse and jumped off in time to catch her, it wasn't even his stop!

  • Whilst manoeuvring my pushchair down the stairs at the Tube station, a front wheel fell off. Two people rushed over immediately to help me. The lovely gentleman managed to temporarily repair my pushchair and the lady, whilst reassuring me, gave me two brightly colored small pretty ribbons as a token gesture. So random and yet it meant so much.

  • (November 2009) I sat in the Tube carriage from South Kensington to Embankment,with tears streaming down my face. When I got out a lady touched my arm and asked if I was okay. I told her that I'd just visited my dad in hospital - he'd just had a heart attack and I wasn't sure if he'd make it. She gave me a hug and said that everything was going to be alright. And it was.

  • It was the peak of summer and I was on my way to my work experience. I had had a morning of arguments and stress at home. I was also running very late and had very painful blisters on my feet. It was rush hour and the Tube was so crowded and hot I felt overwhelmed and couldn't help but burst into tears on the platform. A station attendant came over, gave me a hug, sat me down, gave me water and calmed me right down. I knew she had been told to look out for people because of the heatwave, but I could tell she was genuinely concerned. She was lovely and saved the rest of my day from being a nightmare.

  • I was on the Victoria line about a year ago just 2 days after I had broken my arm at a stag do. I had made a valiant attempt at dressing for work that day, with my arm in cast, but was unable to do my shoelaces. A girl sat opposite me asked me if I'd like her to do them, and with a nervous giggle I agreed. I thanked her, and made a conscious decision not to ask for her number as I didn't want to sully her beautiful gesture. She was fit as well.

  • On the Tube to Shepherd's Bush I had an awful realisation: There was no way I was going to be able to get off! My 5 foot tall self was wedged in the middle of about a million irate people all seeminlgy oblivious to my feeble 'Excuse me's'. The business man next to me sensed my despair and asked me if it was my stop. I nodded and he said "Right, sorry about this" and literally shoved me from the middle to the end of the Tube acting like my human battery ram, waving goodbye as I made it in the nick of the time!

  • At Barbican Tube a homeless gentleman got on who was gaunt in appearance. He addressed the carriage with beautiful manners, soft tone and mentioned that he accepted food too. He came to me and I said I have a bar of dark chocolate and some almonds. He beamed a smile at me and said loudly YES PLEASE! I gave him the food and he went off. A few weeks later we met again, same time & place, this time there were no words just a smile and the food came out of my bag. It felt good to give.

  • My boyfriend and I were getting the last Overground home from London Bridge to Sidcup a couple of weeks ago. The train was so busy we couldn't get a seat. Standing beside each other we caught the eye of a young woman who was propping up a drunk bloke who had passed out, every time the train changed direction he fell over. The woman was really good humoured about it; we caught her eye and all started laughing. As people got off the train we happened to get a seat beside her and the drunk bloke and decided that we should try and find out where he was heading to it turned out it was London Bridge and he had missed his stopped. He was in a bit of a state, his Oyster card was on the floor but we gave it to him and convinced him to get off and head back the way. As we were chatting to the woman she told us that she always tried to help people out especially women late at night. She told us about a young woman she had helped who was passed out on the floor and everyone else had ignored; stepping over her etc. She felt that she had to do something. It turned out that she had got her off the train and called the emergency services and they had insisted that she stayed and accompanied the woman to A & E which she reluctantly did. She kept telling them that she didn't know the woman or where she was going it was just concern that had made her call. I think she worked in a bar and this happened after a night's work when I'm sure all she wanted to do was get home. I was really horrified to hear that the woman wasn't even grateful for the help after she was treated. Worse than that the young woman was left she had to make her own way home at some ungodly hour! What I found really heart-warming was the fact that this hasn't stopped the young woman helping people she just seemed like a genuinely lovely person.

  • It was a hot July evening. Walking through the tunnels beneath Oxford Circus my nose began to bleed uncontrollably. Seeing my distress two young women stopped, gave me tissues and contacted station emergency. Upstairs in the staff toilets I was handed reams of toilet paper whilst a young woman Transport Police Officer rang my husband and gave him directions. I am so thankful l that when I needed help I was able to rely on the kindness of these strangers.

  • Last year, my boyfriend of 7 years broke up with me. I was devastated. Depressed, tired, sick. One morning, on the Tube I couldn't keep the grief in. Shed silent tears down my face. Wanted to shrink into oblivion. At Oxford Circus the Tube emptied. A lady leaving with the hustle of others pushed a tissue into my hand. I sat down, wiped my eyes and felt a little bit warm. I'm fine now. Grand in fact. Last week I was on the tube. A woman opposite me was crying into her elbow. I rummaged through my bag. Only a creased napkin. I just sent her my thoughts instead. And made a vow to carry a pocket of hankies for ever more.

  • I was taking my newborn twins and my two year old daughter to the clinic for a checkup. The only way we could get there was by Underground. I was really struggling with the double buggy. When I got on the Tube the lady opposite me came to look at the babies. 'What beautiful children' she said. She took my hand and pressed something into my palm. I was too scared too look. She said 'get something nice for yourself'. She had given me £50 worth of vouchers. I was touched by the generoisty of a stranger at a time in my life I felt so low. I always remember her in my prayers. She will never know how her actions made me remember my self worth and motivated me to escape a violent marriage. This story is my way of saying thank you.

  • I'd like to thank the myriad of people who have helped me over the years with my children. From help carrying various buggies up and down stairs, to holding my toddler's hand up and down escalators while I held the pram with the baby. Plus all the kind people who gave up their seats for me each time I've been pregnant. I will have to spend the rest of my life paying these acts of kindness forward! Bring it on!

  • Moving your clothes and effects out of an ex-partner's house always hurts. When you own a collection of 3,000 rare soul and funk records, then it's made worse by having to deal with the logistics of dragging this ton of cherished, but obsolete vinyl with you to your new found single gloom. Late one Monday night, I was on the Central line, moving the final load of records across to a student digs in St. Paul's that a friend had offered. Drunk, in my cups, and miserable, I stood up to get off at St. Paul's, and the bottom of the cardboard box I was carrying collapsed, spilling 150 records all over the floor. In the single minute that I had as the doors were open, three people leapt up, scooped up the records with me and loaded them in my arms, enabling me to step off onto the platform. All I could manage was a mouthed "thanks" to them all, before I shambled towards the escalator. I hope this is an opportunity to say thank you again for looking out for me. I've been married to the love of my life for nine years. She even tolerates my record collection.

  • After leaving a 2 hour job interview I missed a kerb on the way out and went flying, cutting my finger and denting my pride. I sat down on the Northern line with shaky hands and the cool looking teenager opposite waved at me and asked if I wanted a plaster. Unexpected kindness made my day.

  • My daughter was in nursery near where I work, so I could go & breastfeed her on my lunch break. So we travelled on the Central line (Stratford - Holborn) everyday. One afternoon on the way home my daughter was getting a bit grouchy & the lovely lady next to me got the diamonte encrusted letter 'O' keyring out for her to play with, my daughter loved it. Soon after the lady was due to get off but could see how thrilled my daughter was with her keyring & so said she could keep it!! I'm sure everyone else on the carriage wanted to thank her too, an unhappy baby in a confined space is no-one's idea of fun!! Thank you mystery 'O' woman !

  • My grandmother recently visited London to celebrate her birthday. Both escalators at Waterloo station were out of order, and she struggles with stairs. She told me how surprised and pleased she was that so many young people stopped to check she was okay or offer her an arm as she needed to keep stopping on her way up. Once they reached the platform a lady gave my nan her entire bottle of water.

  • It was a hot, crowded Hammersmith and City line. I'd hurt my ankle and was using a walking stick. To my surprise and delight, climbing on the train 3 people stood up to offer me a seat. I gratefully took one. As I sat down I saw what looked like blood on my ankle bandage - I'd had a burger earlier and some ketchup had fallen on it!

  • A little boy, maybe 6 or 7 years old, got frightened on an extremely crowded rushhour Victoria line platform, scared of being pushed onto the track. Although his mother tried to reassure him, he became more and more panicked and started to cry. The people around me and I, who moments before had been elbowing each other out of the way, came together to create a gap in the wall of humanity to let them through. When the next train arrived we insisted that the passengers allow mother and child on. Have never been so proud of a group of complete strangers!

  • Just over a year ago on the Tube a woman sitting opposite was crying. Another woman sitting to my side handed her a clean tissue on which she had written "Whatever it is, it will be alright." The crying lady read it, smiled and put it in her glasses case. I wonder if she still has it.

  • I will never forget the kindness of staff at Holborn Tube when one morning I took a turn for the worse, just managed to get off the Tube and vomited blackcurrants all over the station platform. What a way to start their day but they just couldn't have been more professional and kind to me, mopping me up, sitting me in their office and making sure I was OK. What a team!

  • No one story but since I retired innumerable gracious offers of seats on crowded trains by people of both sexes, different nationalities and over a large age range but particularly by young people.

  • I'd like to say thank you to the guy who carried my ridiculously heavy suitcase up 2 flights of stairs in Green Park station, it meant that I got the connecting Tube to Euston just in the knick of time to catch my train to Manchester Piccadilly. If it wasn't for him I wouldn't have made it and would have had to buy a ticket on the spot which usually amounts to 100 odd pounds at least, so in fact I would've had to get a megabus because I certainly couldn't afford that! I don't know what made you stop in the hustle and bustle of lunchtime rush hour but i really appreciated it!

  • I was with my two little boys, one holding my hand, the other in a pram, coming off the platform. I thought my older boy would follow me onto the escalator holding my hand, but he was scared and pulled away from me. I couldn't let go of the pram to go back to get him - I was sailing up away from him, unable to move, shouting for him to follow me, and he was just terrified, paralysed at the bottom of the escalator. A man in a suit grabbed him and carried him up the escalator to me, put him down beside me, and went off before I could thank him.

  • I'll never forget the lovely lady who sat next to me, fished out a packet of posh biscuits from her shopping bags and shared them with me. And the time I was struggling to cart around a suitcase so heavy a wheel fell off, but that didn't stop the many strangers who helped me carry it up and down stairs and escalators, along the platforms and on and off trains. Thank you!

  • I'm from Portugal and I arrived to London for the first time in my life. I was carrying a luggage with over 25kg by myself, unfortunatelly the two handles had broken, and i couldn't carry the luggage with my hands. So, between Victoria Station and Leyton Middle Road Station, I was blessed by four guys that help me with my luggage. What a great experience of kindness, God bless you all!

  • No one can tell that I have a disability, as my trousers cover my leg braces. This makes me feel really shy asking for a seat on the Tube, even though I need one, as it hurts to stand. One night, on a crowded tube, a man must have seen the pain on my face, and gave me his seat - it felt like heaven.

  • I may give my seat to a stranger today, and they might do the same to someone I know tomorrow! Circle of life.

  • It's years ago since this happened but I've never forgotten a girl's kindness and generosity and would like to thank her. I felt faint at Warren Street and had to get off the train. She saw me struggling and offered me a drink of water. Then she left her whole bottle with me as she went off, presumably, to her place of work.

  • At the end of a long day of corporate training in the City I was about to lift my suitcase of materials to drag it up the stairs at Gloucester Road when a young man offered to carry it all the way up for me. I thanked him and was delighted he was so thoughtful. I am 61.

  • The Tube took off from King's Cross Piccadilly line southbound. A woman stumbled and ended up sitting on my lap. She was very apologetic and painfully embarrassed. I quipped "don't worry woman throw themselves at me all the time, I'm used to it." Her shame transformed into laughter. When I got off at Russell Square she was still smiling.

  • I had been studying in London for about half a year and was getting the Tube during early morning rush hour for a lecture. I was feeling homesick and alone despite just having spent the night at my loving boyfriend's. Even though there was snow on the ground I suddenly started feeling very hot and ill. I awoke to find myself on the floor, surrounded by faces. When we arrived at Leyton I stumbled off, and nobody moved to help even though I could barely stand. I have never felt more alone and helpless than I did just at that moment. Through the haze, a handsome young man appeared and took my arm. He supported me to the staff room and as I teared up, he was joking hopefully about getting a free cup of coffee. I would like to thank him as I never got the chance.

  • Having just completed a half marathon I was on the Tube heading home. Suddenly I felt incredibly dizzy and started breaking out in a cold sweat. A lady spotted me putting me head on my knees and came over. After a few questions she promptly turned around and told her husband (who'd been running the same race) to hand over his bottle of water and home-made sandwich. This did wonders to stabilise my blood sugar and got me home feeling endlessly grateful and just about human again!

  • It was my 17th birthday and I was rushing to leave Angel station but I'd dropped my pink jacket, I turned to see a brown-haired man going to pick it up, I retreived it, I had earphones in, so he smiled and gave a thumbs up with his hands. He was beautiful, I was embarrassed to thank him and quickly walked away. A year later, I still remember him, if you're reading this, thank you.

  • I was on the way home from work on the Victoria Line. I had a very sad day. A family friend had passed away at a very young age and I had just heard the news so I was making my way home from work trying to fight back tears on the Underground when a stranger reached out to me to ask if I needed any help. To this day I will never forget the kindness and courage shown to me on this occasion and in hindsight I wish I could have thanked that person for offering to help me and brightening up my day.

  • I walk into Redbridge Station, pat myself down, OMG I've lost my oyster! I panic frantically but see this beautiful girl smiling at me as she walks my way. She asks me where I'm going and buys me a ticket home. I ask for her name number and here we still are nearly 11 months on!

  • Near Christmas one year, I lost my iPod while running for a Metropolitan line train. I didn't realise until the doors had shut, and assumed it was lost for good. It was a month after me and my boyfriend had broken up, and it felt like yet another blow. A few weeks later a note came in the post saying my iPod (which I'd named after my postcode) was found, and if I could describe it then he'd send it back. He wanted no postage costs, and duly sent it back to me, recorded delivery, with a friendly note. Faith restored.

  • A kindly lady sat opposite me on the Metropolitan line leant over and gave me the gentlest, kindest and most tender little squeeze when she saw the tear that had been threatening to fall from my eye all the way from King's Cross to Liverpool Street finally come tumbling down my cheek. One after the other, they came; so many stupid tears over a stupid boy who I liked more than I knew I did. Thank you, lovely lady with your pink and yellow scarf and your warm, gentle kindness.

  • I was taking a difficult journey on the District and Overground lines (lots of stairs) with a ridiculously heavy suitcase. As I was about to attempt the stairs to the first station a lovely business man stopped to help me carry the case. When I arrived at my destination I was being jossled in rush hour people traffic as everyone fought to leave the platform, though I was still struggling with the case. Another lovely man offered to carry it up the stairs for me. How gentlemanly!

  • I'd had a c-section a couple of days before. Our son was in intensive care but I had been discharged from hospital so I had to travel to see him. Instead of spending more money on taxis, we decided to take the Piccadilly Line. The train was crowded. A woman dressed in nice boots, glittery eyeshadow and red glasses gave up her seat for me, even though no-one could have known what I was going through. I'd like to say thank you.

  • On a dank, dark day in the new year, like hundreds of others, I had the misfortune to have 'flu. But this day on the Tube was quite special. I coughed as quietly as I could.... but no tissue could suppress the beast pacing up and down my throat so interminably. I was considering getting off the Tube just to have a good cough, when a lady tapped me on the shoulder. She smiled kindly and handed me a wrapped cough sweet. The gesture made others smile too, and with a few sucks of the sweet, my cough retreated.

  • A friend from the U.S. was visiting. As we rode the bus to Victoria Station we reviewed her itinerary on her iPad. Sooner than expected, the bus approached our stop and we gathered our things to rush off. As the bus was pulling away it suddenly stopped and the doors opened. A student emerged, holding my friend's iPad and handed it back to us. London is now her favourite city.

  • I was late home after the office holiday party. As the last train approached my bag fell over and I knew I couldn't gather my things and get on the train before the doors closed. It was then a young man appeared, knelt down, picked up my bag and took me by the arm saying "Let's get you on this train." The door closed and he disappeared from view before I realized I hadn't said "thank you".

  • I was coming home from the theatre, very late, when I was quite young and happened to sit opposite a lady who had been to a party and was rather merry. It must have been wedding or something for she was holding a little bouquet of flowers. She liked my dress, it had lighthouses printed round the bottom, and we chatted for a little while. She got off before me but just as she was about to step off the train, she turned back and gave me her bouquet of flowers, saying to my dad, 'you have a lovely daughter.' I've never forgotten that beautifully random act of kindness.

  • I was on the Tube from City Airport into town when two men in suits got on opposite me, talking business. As they talked, one of them took a sheet of paper and started folding it. He made a beautiful origami flower, and just as he was about to get off, turned and presented with a smile to the young woman sitting next to him. The smile quickly spread to her, and then to everyone else in the carriage as we saw the look of surprise and delight on her face.

  • I am terrified of escalators. I was on the Underground with my son and husband, they got on the escalators and I was following. My young son's shoe fell off and I panicked and couldn't get on the (very steep) escalator to go down to the Tube. Everyone was rushing past me and I was getting more upset when a total angel of a young lady held my hand and helped me on. She talked to me the whole way down,where I was reunited with husband and son. Thank you so much, whoever you were xx

  • The staff at Gloucester Road are simply amazing! I was poorly en route to work early this morning. They took me in, gave me a glass of water and offered me a seat to recover. Touching - an experience that won't be forgotten.

  • An elderly tourist fell and knocked her front tooth out when our train moved off. Shocked, I volunteered I was a dentist. Fellow travellers helped me find the tooth, offered plastic bags to use as gloves, and gave tissues and support. Together, we successfully replanted the lady's upper incisor. It put a smile back on all our faces that day.

  • After taking the wrong exit out of London Bridge station I spent two hours walking around lost. When I eventually made my way back to the station I was crying quite a lot. A man on the Tube offered me a tissue. When I went to give him the packet back he said, keep it.

  • A deaf man sat next to me on the Tube was trying to ask me a question. I couldn't understand him so I got my sketchbook out and let him write it. I answered his question about how many stops it was to Manor House, and we get kept writing to each other and had a conversation. He had been drinking and was wobbly on his feet when he got up for his stop and I walked with him to the door. When I sat back down the woman next to me gave me a bookmark she had bought 'for being so kind to him'

  • My mother recently purchased a copy of J G Ballard's 'Miracle Of Life'. When paying she was shown a special offer copy so she bought this instead. She then changed her mind and also bought the copy without the promotional stickers - keeping the other copy (typical behaviour). She was later reading the second copy on the Tube and a young man politely expressed his excitement about the author. She thought his enthusiasm was sweet so she pulled out the spare copy from her bag and gave it to him. She said he seemed really pleased.

  • I started to feel a tightness in my chest followed by a hot and sweaty feeling. At the next stop I got off and sat down - head bent over knees. A young lady with a child in a pushchair asked "Are you OK?" She stayed with me awhile. The little girl gave me a beaming smile which helped distract me from myself. Everyone was so kind.

  • I was on the Tube the other day and a HUGE bee decided to get on to join me and the half full carriage. A very kind man who saw that people were distressed captured the bee in his hands and took it off with him at the next stop! Thank you to that man on behalf of myself and the rest of the carriage!!

  • On my way to work during rush hour, I suddenly felt very nauseous and actually fainted. I quickly came round as three women rushed to my aid - one offered me her seat, one gave me her water and another fanned me with her Metro until I got off. None of them knew each other, or me, but we shared a sense of sister solidarity.

  • The Northern line seems to be a constant source of kindness for me. A while ago I was feeling extremely ill on the tube, and a woman clearly seeing my distress offered me some of her paracetamol. Another time, quite recently I was having a bad day and was rather upset. A young lady opposite me looked at me sympathetically and handed me a packet of tissues. It really is the little things in life. Thank you, Northern line passengers!

  • I drew a sketch of a couple leaning on each other sleeping on the Tube. At my stop, in a split second decision I put the sketch on top of the woman's crossed arms. It was a super cute moment, and was glad to document it.

  • I broke my foot in December 2010. I had to travel on the Tube from Jan - March on crutches which was difficult and sometimes scary. In that time period I had to stand only 3 times. I want to THANK ALL the people who gave up their seat for me every day. It meant so much to me!

  • I got on the Tube as it turned out rather too soon after giving blood and shortly after fainted. I managed to stumble off at the next station. An off-duty paramedic and his family saw I wasn't looking well, laid me down on the platform, stayed with me until I felt a bit better then helped me up to the exit and offered to buy me a cup of tea. Unfortunately I wasn't with it enough to get their name at the time, but if they're reading this thank you so much.

  • I was on the way to Notting Hill Gate when I was 17, it was really crowded and I was squashed next to this man in a busness suit, he kept almost falling asleep until eventually he did and he sort of ended up resting his head on my shoulder, he looked so tired so I just let him sleep there. He only woke up when the train was close to my stop and i couldn't help my self laughing and I jogged him awake. When he saw me he looked a bit embarrassed but happy.

  • Broken hearted after breaking up with a guy I was seeing I broke down in tears.. Alone on the Tube I cried, well I SOBBED!! The man sitting next to me offered me a tissue, which made me cry even more, then the girl opposite came over and gave me a cuddle as she got off the Tube and said 'he's not worth it' she was right.. The man next to got off the next stop and gave me the pack of tissues.. I felt better...

  • "I think you smiled at me a few stations ago". Such was his opening line. I cringed at being chatted up in the packed and silent carriage, but as the train hurtled on, something softened. By the time he alighted, he'd won me round. Turns out humanity abounds in the most anonymous of places. A lesson we'll tell our children: it only takes a smile.

  • I often wonder whether the TfL staff at Oval who come up with the Thought for the Day quotes realise exactly how many people they single-handedly send off to work with a spring in their step and a renewed sense of purpose, every day, week in, week out. Thanks, guys! Keep it up!

  • One rainy rush hour afternoon not long ago I was walking up the platform at Vauxhall. A girl had been shopping and her paper shopping bag had got rained on and ripped with all of the contents spilling out all over the platform. As most people rushed past a nice man stopped to help her collect her belongings. As I kept walking I realised I had a spare plastic bag in my hand bag, as I walked back I saw another friendly passenger handing over a plastic bag. This made me realise it's nice to know you have someone to rely on when you can't rely on your paper shopping bag!

  • Being 18 weeks pregnant with twins, and still feeling pretty sick most mornings, everytime someone gives up their seat for me as I journey to work is the most enormous act of kindness. Thank you to you all - past and future!

  • I was crying as I walked down the escalator at Green Park - I had just broken up with my boyfriend and a man took me for a cup of tea and reassured me that everything was going to be OK. It really helped!

  • I am an art student and once while I was travelling to uni at Camberwell, I was sitting opposite a lady, she was reading The Times. I started drawing her (trying to be discreet) - I noticed tears running down her face. When it was time for me to get off, I gave her my drawing - i had written on the bottom 'don't cry - you are a beautiful strong woman,' she looked shocked and then gave me a big smile - as I walked away I looked and she looked happy. I think the drawing conveyed this.

  • As I got off the Tube someone kicked my shoe off by mistake and it went onto the rail lines. I hopped all the way to the ticket barrier and a kind member of staff gave me a big hug and said "let's go get that shoe!" as we went back down to the platform he told me of all the funny things they find on the tracks and how he promised not to put this ordeal on youtube via the cctv cameras! He got the next tube that was coming along to stop, pulled out a extendable arm and managed to find my rather expensive shoe! He put my shoe back on for me as if i was Cinderella which made nearby people chuckle and wished me well. I think he probably did one of the nicest acts of kindness I've come across!

  • While travelling with my large and heavy suitcase a very helpful man assisted me by taking my suitcase down a number of stairs. Needless to say I was very grateful after lugging the thing around for a long time and being a very tiny person myself.

  • I am disabled and am frequently assisted by passengers on the Central line. One incident which sticks in my mind was when I was getting off a Tube. In order to do this, I hang on to the handle by the door and gently lower myself down. One chap standing by the door just cuffed my elbow in his hand to assist - it was such a gentle and unobtrubsive way of acting. This is just one out of many kind incidents. I would like to thank all those kind people. Before my disabilites, I can remember standing on the Central line returning home after a long flight. There were no outward signs that we were travellers as our luggage had been lost. I was moaning to my friend how tired I was and we were offered seats.

  • I'm a supervisor on the Tube. A young lady came to the gateline crying her eyes out. She was going on holiday and had just been pickpocketed, £250, her entire spending money. Another girl approached me and asked if she could help in any way. I explained what had happened. She went into her purse, gave the girl £250 and said ''Jesus loves you'', and then just walked away. Both myself and the girl were stunned

  • Sitting on a hot tube, reading and with my earphones in, a man sat next to me with his back to me. He suddenly turned around and asked if I was a student, I replied 'No' and then he gave me two peaches. That was all. I was a little confused but found it to be a very sweet moment in my life, as were the peaches!

  • A couple of weeks ago I was getting the train to work at East Finchley, there were lots of wasps flying about while I was waiting on the platform and I was praying for the train to hurry up because I am scared of them. I got on the train and a man who got on at a subsequent stop got my attention and told me that I had one in my hair, he then batted it with a paper until it flew out of my hair. I can't thank him enough, I really am truly grateful.

  • Having been shopping at Hobbs on the King's Road, I cleverly left the bag on the Jubilee line at Canary Wharf. Thank you to the person who turned the bag in at West Ham - tags and all. No one could believe it, even staff! The favour was returned via a scarf left on the same line.

  • Walking home from work one normal day several years ago, I received a phone call telling me that my Dad had an accident that afternoon and had died. I was alone, in shock and desperately had to get home quickly. I didn't have enough money for a cab so I stumbled blindly onto a bus and then a Tube. I was terrified and probably hysterical (but at the same time trying to keep calm as I was still sane enough to feel embarrassed about making a scene!). A young lady in the carriage asked me if I was okay and gave me a tissue. I must have blocked out most of that awful journey so I'm not sure if we spoke much but I'll never forget her kindness. Thank you.

  • It was Christmas and my first, very long journey back from Uni. I had naively packed pretty much all of my possessions into an especially cumbersome suitcase. I was new to the Underground system and instead of using lifts I struggled to get my suitcase up and down the stairs. As it happens I barely lifted a finger as at every single flight of stairs someone helped me out. I'll never forget the kind faces of the 6 people who helped a wide-eyed, sweaty-faced student in distress!

  • It was very hot on the train, and I could feel myself about to pass out. As I slid down the glass panel of the carriage, I explained to the man next to me I was going to pass out. When I came to, I was holding his hand, and he was clutching onto mine. He picked me up and made sure I was ok... once the doors opened I got some air and felt fine again. He was a total stranger and he really took care of me, as did all the other passengers close by.

  • Sitting isolated and slumped in aTube seat in the afternoon, drenched in tears following an argument with my boyfriend, I got a tap on my shoulder from a girl holding up a phone. Perplexed I told her it wasn't mine. She looked confused, looked at the phone and pressed a button so the screen illuminated. She had written 'Are you ok?' It was a glimmer of kindness that momentarily lit up a bleak, regrettable situation.

  • I had just swiped out at Limehouse when a smartly dressed gentleman drew my attention to a hankerchief which had fallen unseen from my pocket as I took out my Oyster card. I was delighted - the hanky was a delicate white cotton embroidered with flowers. I had bought it in Venice thirty years ago and would have been very sad to lose it.

  • Looking around Victoria station, I glanced at a guard at the luggage barrier as I wondered what would be the best exit for my destination. As I turned towards the guard to ask for directions, I was amazed to see that in the few seconds I'd looked away, he had disappeared! He then popped up from the barrier and laughed. I laughed too which made me feel more relaxed for my imminent job interview!

  • My experience of an act of kindness is always the same which is when someone is good enough to offer me their seat. Being a Senior Citizen it is hard standing up for the whole journey, especially when I see so many youngsters & even children sitting down, so the rare occasion I am offered a seat is much appreciated.

  • On a cold sunday lunchtime last February I was right in the middle of a crowded carriage when I was uncontrollably sick. The poor people around me looked horrified. I felt terrible. The train got into St James's and I stood by the door not knowing what to do. A woman asked if I was ok, saw I wasn't, got off the train with me (and her daughter) and fetched a staff member. she gave me her shopping bag to put my sick-covered coat in and the Tube worker got me a glass of water and made sure I was ok. I felt so looked after, and very thankful.

  • About 6 months ago I was on a very crowded Piccadilly line train. Myself and my boyfriend had just finished a week working 12 hour shifts in catering so we were constantly on our feet and subsequently totally exhausted. When we first boarded he kindly allowed me the only seat and he himself leaned against the cushioned side. The train filled to bursting, so much so that when an elderly lady boarded I was unable to offer my seat for her (trapped in) however my boyfriend immediately offered his ledge. This was lovely in itself but it is the lady's reaction that I adored. She was touched but declined, explaining she would be getting off at the next stop but then suddenly remembered that (in her words) "Mother always said; 'Never refuse a gentleman his seat if he offers it, lest he hesitate in offering it again' - so please, although I am not taking your seat, please do offer it again!" - what a lovely moment, makes me smile everytime I think of it!

  • My boyfriend had just broken up with me and I took the Tube back home. A guy in my carriage carrying a guitar asked me what my favourite song was. He played "Imagine" for me and when I went to give him some cash he said: I just wanted to see someone smiling.

  • I was suffering terrible grief by the recent death of both my father and brother and was travelling home through Charing Cross. As I got off the train in tears, stumbling, probably looking quite drunk and convinced I was invisible to the world as I was in London, a young woman came up to ask if I was alright. She left me with a glow in my heart from her kindness and a feeling that life was possible again.

  • After a tiring journey from Birmingham, I arrived at North Greenwich and withdrew cash from an ATM. As I went to catch a bus upstairs, I was called back to the Ticket Hall where staff member explained that he'd retrieved my card which I'd left in the machine. His honesty, courtesy and prompt action really cheered me up after an exhausting day.

  • A hot summer day years ago when I had just arrived here I was on the Central line and was feeling so faint I had to lie down when I got to South Woodford. A young man went out of the station bought me a bottle of water came back and waited till I was feeling ok. London is a wonderful place I wish I could thank him again.

  • Being a forgetful person who leaves things everywhere, I left my phone on the Tube, and didn't realise untill I got home! That night I got a call from my mum (on the landline of course,) who said a man had found it, rang her to tell her to tell me, to meet him at his workplace the next day to collect it! What a nice person to go through all that effort! I went the next day, and was so thrilled to have it back! I wanted to hug the chap! But londoners don't hug each other...do they? :)

  • About year ago, I was walking through Vauxhall station late at night. I looked up the stairs to see a young lady in heels staggering. Foolishly, I continued walking, and moments later I saw her fall. She landed head first onto the floor. I ran back and reassured her until the ambulance came. We talked about her job, that she lived in Putney etc. I never got chance to find our her full name, but the hospital told me, after I described the situation, that she was discharged several days later. I was so happy she was okay.

  • As a student many years ago I was travelling home late one night in an empty carriage. A group of guys going home from a heavy metal concert got on, so I tried to pretend I wasn't there as I was a little worried. When I got up to get off one of them came over to me, and offered to escort me home as he was concerned about me walking alone so late at night!

  • I once sat opposite an angel on the tube... some people who were up to no good sat around me. The angel sat opposite me, he smiled over at me, then he opened his briefcase, took out a newspaper and held it up to me. 'change carraiges now' was written accross the top. I did. And as I left the carriage, he sat there unafraid.

  • Last October I took initiative to convince our boss to participate in Jeans for Genes day. One night on the way home on the Piccadilly line while I was calculating my funds raised so far and reading the Jeans for Genes day leaflet. The guy who sat next to me, gave me £20 as donation and another guy opposite me gave me £10. This made my night and I encouraged them to write their names and address if they are tax payers, which will enable the charity to an additional 20p through gift aid. Definitely we do have some generous commuters!

  • My daughter & I were passed by a WW2 veteran who had clearly come from a memorial service. A red beret fell out of his pocket & onto the platform, but he carried off into the distance without it. Like a flash my daughter sped after him through the crowds & handed him it back. The guy's reaction was so heart-warming. He proceeded to regale her with war tales, all dewy-eyed. Most edifying.

  • Some years ago I got of the Tube at Waterloo and by the time I got up the escalators I realised I had lost my purse - with all my cards and tickets in. I went up to a nearby guard and explained the situation, they took me to the control room and there had my purse, it had fallen out of my pocket onto my seat in the middle of a Friday rush hour, and some one had handed it in. Thank you to whichever kind person did this, it confirmed my faith in human kindness.

  • I lost my brand new iPhone on bus at Holborn. When I arrived at the pub I was meeting my husband in, he promptly advised me that someone had called him advising they had my phone and that they would be in Brick Lane for a pick up. We jumped into a taxi and met a lovely German couple who were waiting patiently to return my iPhone. They said they had lost a phone in similar circumstances. Whilst it's only a phone it was the gesture that was so generous and kind.

  • While on the Central line, a gentleman opposite me was sending me inquisitive looks and scribbling on a piece of paper. When I looked again, he held up the paper which read 'you are beautiful'. I treasure this memory, not only for his kindness to say such lovely words, but to have the courage to say them.

  • Whilst on the Tube an elderly lady got on and I immediately gave up my seat. Unfortunately I had just come from a rehearsal and had my bassoon, bag and a sandwich. I quickly gathered my things and stood up allowing for the woman to sit down. The Tube train then started moving before I had a chance to hold onto anything and promptly stumbled and would have fallen flat on the floor if the lady hadn't put out a hand to stop me falling! I was very grateful.

  • I was hopelessly lost on the way to Euston station as a newcomer to London and ended up on a bus diversion with no idea how I would make my train - a stranger who was on his way home after a day at work offered to walk me to Euston Station, completely out of his way. He then gave me his business card, and months later, gave me an internship to help me get started in my chosen career.

  • One day I suddenly felt so faint on a Piccadilly rush hour Tube, I couldn't get my head round the words to ask to sit down. A lady saw how pale I must have looked, took control, got me a seat before I fainted & stayed with me until I felt better. I have often wished I could have thanked her for helping when nobody else did.

  • A woman didn't see that she had dropped a £5 note as she boarded the Tube. A man spotted it on the floor and tapped her on the shoulder to point it out. She looked so grateful as she thanked him and picked it back up.

  • Met Line-got off at Finchley Road. Doors closed. Suddenly realised I'd left my bag on the seat with money,phone,credit cards,keys,driving licence etc. Panic,sweating. Went to Baker St to Lost Property to register loss. Went home. Wife says ''You lucky so and so''. A guy had picked it up, found my business card, phoned my office. Met my boss at Green Park and handed over the bag. Used my phone to call my home to tell wife. I phoned him later to thank him from bottom of my heart. Didn't want anything for the kind deed so I sent him a Christmas card. That will teach me to check all belongings before getting off the train.

  • Exceptionally crowded Central Line; no room to move. Very hot day; even hotter on train. While picking up bag (with difficulty) to leave at Bank, my metal-rimmed glasses fell from shirt pocket. I didn't notice they had gone until I had struggled to platform, when -- without time to shout or gesture to passengers who had been my erstwhile neighbours -- doors closed in my face and train left. As it was all but impossible to see the carriage floor, I assumed they would have been trampled underfoot at or before Liverpool Street, and proceeded to obtain a substitute (but necessarily cheaper) pair. Nevertheless I reported their loss. Within a week, I was amazed to gain re-possession of a wholly undamaged pair. They had been handed in at Mile End. I remain hugely impressed by this selfless act of kindness on the part of an unidentified fellow passenger, and by the efficiency and ethical behaviour of London Underground and its (unknown) staff. Perhaps some of those concerned will read this and accept my thanks, not least for their contributions to engendering mutual respect, and generating some of the glue that fosters social cohesion

  • On a cold winter's morning on the District line I nearly missed my stop at Sloane Square so rushed off the train only to realise that I had dropped one of my gloves. I turned round to realise that the doors were about to close. In an instant a young lady picked my glove off the train floor and threw it through the doors, straight to me, just before they closed. Good shot! That saved me walking to the office with one cold hand.

  • My brother and I were only little when our dad took us on holiday. He was carrying the cases on the Tube. We ran ahead to catch the train and he shouted for us to stop as the doors closed. The train left with us on it but him not. A lady saw us crying and waited with us at the next stop until our dad came to get us. We never knew her name.

  • Travelling to work one day, I wasn't feeling too well. It was rush hour and everyone was packed in like sardines. I started to feel dizzy, and shortly thereafter fainted somewhere between Bermondsey and London Bridge stations. Everyone on the train managed to make some space to give me some air, but there was one lady whose kindness I will not forget because she offered me the banana from her lunch! I never got a chance to say thank you... so to the lady who helped me that day - a very big thank you!

  • A few weeks ago my partner and I were travelling on the Northen line dressed up for a special meal together in Covent Garden. While we were chatting away, two older ladies in the carriage simultaneously approached us they got off at Stockwell. One lady said how nice is was to see such a happy couple and that we looked lovely together. The other then approached and wished us a happy life together! It was such a nice shock, both my partner and I started to get teary-eyed! Needless to say we went on to have a wonderful evening. Thank you ladies!

  • I was on the Hammersmith & City line chatting to a happy family of six on holiday from Africa, coming from the zoo and going to Westfield. As they got off at White City, they left behind their camcorder. I got off at the next stop and ran towards White City hoping to find them, which I did. I was promptly given a big hug by both parents.

  • A couple of months ago I travelled on the Tube with my husband to King's Cross to celebrate our anniversary. To my surprise, a young man offered me his seat. This had never happened before. On the way home that same evening another young man offered me his seat. Those two acts of kindness confirmed to me that I am now old in the eyes of the world.

  • 10th December 2008, my world crashed, was made redundant. Recession, not needed. Rug pulled from underneath me. Scared, lost, alone. Collapsed on seat, tears unstoppable. Stranger sitting next to me, tissue, held hand, not a word but knowing, he left, woman replaced him, hand held, no words exchanged. Man replaced her. Was not alone but held. Light on dark journey.

  • I'd had a terrible day prior to boarding the Central line at Bank. It was quite late in the evening and the platform very busy. Upon boarding, I was pushed by the crowd, causing one of my shoes to fall off onto the track! I burst into tears at this, the incident being the final straw. Luckily, the lovely businessman standing next to me offered me a tissue, whilst a lady offered me a plastic bag to cover my foot for the journey back - luckily I didn't have to hop home!

  • The stiff breeze on the Underground platform floated my summer straw hat off my head and on to the track. I had had it for many years and was fond of it. Assuming I'd lost it forever, I decided to ask the staff anyway, if there was any way to retrieve it safely - even if there was, I supposed a train would probably come along and finish it off. To my amazement, and delight, a charming station employee brought a "grabber stick" and lay full length on the platform (luckily, still no trains!) and got it back for me - I felt quite foolish, but he was cheerful and willing to help. I felt good all day, and still do when I think of it. Thanks to that kind person, and to Michael Landy for reminding me.

  • Getting on the Tube at Notting Hill I felt sick and dizzy, but decided to press on with my journey. About 3 minutes in I started shaking and then fainted. I was brought round by the assortment of people on the carriage, a wide range of people all hugely kind. One lady gave me a bottle of water while a young guy offered to walk me to the gate. Really made me feel lucky to live in cosmopolitan London.

  • I have a little baby and we often travel on Tube. Usually we go to parks, shops or to meet my friends. I have a small buggy that with some effort I can carry myself on stairs. Fortunately, I rarely have to do it myself. There are so many wonderful people around who are kindly helping me most of the time! I am so grateful and happy to know that we live in a world where people do care about each other.

  • A father with his baby boy was waving at Tube trains as they went by. I got on the Tube and looked at the baby and waved at him with a huge smile. Both father and son pointed and waved me away with a huge warm smile. We were both strangers but it made my day.

  • Due to engineering works I helped a confused elderly gentlemen to Heathrow to make his flight home. There was a replacement bus service from Ealing Broadway so I walked and talked with him and when we got to Ealing Broadway I even made sure he had enough money on his oyster card for the bus journey to Heathrow.

  • During the 7/7 terrorist acts, I was unfortunate enough to be on the Piccadilly line train affected between King's Cross and Russell Square. The whole event was terrifying, but my enduring memory years on is of the older lady next to me offering me her Rescue Remedy as we crouched on the floor waiting for help! I'll also never forget how everyone took turns and waited patiently to be helped off the train - 'After you, no after you...' - even in such scary circumstances. Everyone really did look after each other and these beautiful little gestures are the things I try to remember when I think of that horrible day.

  • I am a disabled wheelchair user and a passenger on a one day return trip from King's Cross to Uxbridge. The station supervisor was really a Godsend and when King's Cross staff said they could not take me off, he sent one of the staff to escort me on the 1 hour journey from Uxbridge to King's Cross just to take me off the train. God bless you guys, you're the BOMB.This was an unprecedented Act of Kindness.

  • On the District line one day I sat down opposite an elegant woman in her 60s. The Tube driver was explaining why we were stuck in a tunnel, "we're waiting on a signal, so sorry ladies and gentleman...", then began muttering along to himself quite amusingly. The woman and I began to laugh and made eye contact. We struck up a conversation about how the English are constantly apologising for themselves and how in Italy the driver would be completely unapologetic. She was Italian and a Linguistics professor. A most fascinating, flamboyant woman with a wonderful infectious laugh. As I left the train, I said goodbye and she responded "ciao beautiful girl!" I think about her sometimes and tell people about how interesting she was. I wish we could have remained friends.

  • When I was a crutch earlier this year a gentleman picked up my suitcase at the bottom of the stairs and carried it up, walking alongside me. He was clearly in a rush and not particularly interested in sparking up conversation, it was simply second nature for him to help me, which is what stuck in my mind. Thank you.

  • I was on the Tube to King's Cross to go home for Christmas - so excited but engrossed in my book. I put my bag with all my worldly belongings in it, presumably safely, by my side - holding my laptop, phone, purse, ipod, Christmas presents for my family and many worthless sentimental items - and by the time the Tube got to my stop it had been stolen. In floods of tears, I was distraught that I wouldn't be able to see my family, I had lost my ticket and money, but a kindly festive stranger bought me a new ticket back home and lunch! Best Christmas present I've ever received, I'll never forget it.

  • Thanks to the man on the Metropolitan line train who tried to push my forgotten bag out of the train I had left it on. He went on to hand it in to Lost Property and I was reunited with my favourite shoes very promptly!

  • I was transporting several very heavy light-stands from Wimbledon to Archway and I was really struggling to carry them. Two very kind strangers (one at Vauxhall & one at Archway) offered to help me carry them up the stairs. Then when I got to Archway at about midnight the TFL staff very kindly drove me home (10mins up Highgate Hill) in a TFL van!! :) Thank you!

  • I was off to work on a Monday morning heading to Victoria, saw a blind man in the District line needed help so I offered help as I was going the same direction. I was running late but it didn't really bother me at all. I helped him and got off with him at Monument station as he changed his mind and decided to go Leyton instead. But the station staff member took control and guided him......I was so pleased to see that the Underground staff really do make the difference. God bless them.

  • My sister came to visit me for the weekend before going to Spain for her holidays. It was the day of the Gay Pride parade so the Tube was packed, and as we were travelling to mine a tipsy teenager projectile vomited on her and her suitcase. I was no help because I couldn't stop laughing but, prompted by sympathy and schadenfreude, strangers started to bring out hankies to help my sister clean up.

  • Silly little thing. Was sat on a district line train on a Monday morning with a big present for my boyfriend. I wanted to retie the ribbon around the box and was struggling to do it with one pair of hands. The lady opposite me stood up and came over to help me out. I know it's only a small act of kindness, but doesn't often happen in this sometimes lonely city!

  • A girl forgot her jacket on the Tube when she got off. I noticed and shouted in vain. I threw the jacket on the platform right before the door closed. Then two nice ladies picked up the jacket and gestured me that they would catch the owner of the jacket. It was a fun relay of kindness.

  • This lady, she's jammed in a crowded Tube with a pile of heavy suitcases. Tube stops, Charlie goes to help her. Doors open: Charlie holds back the boarding commuters with a hands-up "stop" gesture then heaves every one of the cases out onto the platform, stacks them in a pile. Then he turns and ushers the lady off the Tube like royalty. doors shut and he's left standing on the platform. it's not his stop. she goes to say something and he makes his stop gesture again and says "no no never mind I'll get the next one" and she says "they're not my cases" and walks off.

  • I was travelling on the Piccadilly line just before I was about to go on holiday when the lady sitting opposite me started to look unwell - she had obviously been out drinking. Suddenly and without warning she threw up all over me - it was then apparent that she had also been drinking Blackcurrant Hooch! The train pulled into the station and she ran from the train. The lady who had been sitting next to her smiled and pulled out a handful of brand new tea-towels that she had just bought. 'Here', she offered 'you can use these to clean yourself up, I can always buy some more'.

  • I was having a really tough time and was feeling really emotional as I was changing lines at King's Cross. Walking down the stairs I burst in to tears and found myself having difficulty breathing. A girl in her twenties ran up to me and hugged me. We hugged for about 5 minutes and she helped me calm down my breathing. She was so lovely and I didn't even know her name. I can't thank her enough for her kindness.

  • I stepped off the Tube at Marble Arch station, and heard someone knocking on the window behind me. A man was at the window, holding up the phone that had slipped out of my pocket. Too slow to respond, the doors closed, but he mouthed 'next stop!'. I waited for the next train, and sure enough at Bond Street he was there waiting for me - with his wife and three children. He put the phone in my hand with a smile and rushed by me to continue his journey. I never got a chance to thank him properly, but a year later when a carriage full of people noticed a phone left on a seat, I thought of the experience and volunteered to be the one to return it. Kindness inspires kindness, after all!

  • After a rather raucous and drunken work Christmas party, I'd made it on to the last Tube to Vauxhall when I suddenly started to feel nauseous. I became horribly aware that I was going to be sick, acutely embarrassed at the fact, and conscious that there was nothing I could do to stop it. I was just putting my hands to my face when, in the nick of time, the lady opposite me held an empty plastic bag under my nose. Both the other passengers and I were extremely relieved and grateful!

  • One Christmas after a visit home I got on a very busy tube with a heavy backpack. There weren't any seats so I had to stand up. I started to feel really hot and my legs started to wobble. The next thing I knew I woke up on a seat. I'd fainted and a man and a woman, who were friends, had helped me to the seat. I have always wanted to thank them. Thank you.

  • This is not really a story but I would like to express appreciation to the many young people who offer their seat to me in a crowded train.Though I am 80 years old I am able-bodied and they would be quite justified in thinking I could manage to stand which makes the gesture all the more generous.

  • My friends and I were rushing to catch the last train from Wimbledon, after getting on the train an incredibly drunk man moved towards us and started threatening us. The Tube was abandoned and we needed to get home so we simply moved carriages - the man followed us. Once we had moved to the carriage behind the driver, a friendly face opened the door. We were ushered into the front of the Tube for the rest of the journey and when we got to our stop he let us out first and made sure we were safe before opening the other doors. Thank You - we will never forget such an incredible act of kindness.

  • I always carry tea biscuits in my bag because my daughter is diabetic. On hearing a wee boy asking his dad if he had missed his dinner because he was hungry, I offered him a biscuit. He looked at his dad for permission, who nodded, he took a biscuit and nibbled it from side to side, the look on that kid's face was priceless and made others around smile.

  • On a crowded Tube train a woman stands and reads her newspaper. An insert drops to the floor. A man stoops, picks it up and hands it to her. She thanks him with a wide smile.

  • I was made redundant on my birthday. I was feeling pretty deflated and the staff at Pimlico noticed my change in mood. Imagine my joy and surprise when they presented me with massive chocolate birthday cake! That gesture really gave me back my sense of self worth. I took some back next day with cans of pop for them at breaktimes. Our Tube workers are everyday subterranean heroes. Thank you.

  • As I left the tube at Holborn station one morning, I realised there was a wallet left on the seat by my side. I picked it up thinking it belonged to the lady who was sat beside me but when I caught up with her on the escalator she said it wasn't hers. I checked for ID and it belonged to a student from Thailand but there were no other details other than his name on an Australian Student card. That night I called the uni in Australia and explained I was in London and I wanted to get his wallet back to him. They called him, gave him my email address and we met the next day outside the Tube. He was really grateful I'd gone the extra mile to reunite him with his wallet!

  • I inadvertently left an expensive Pentax camera on the Tube from Fulham Broadway to South Kensington, realising I'd lost this whilst walking through Knightsbridge. I resigned myself to never seeing my camera or the more important photographs again, but registered this as a lost item on the TfL website anyway. Less than a week later, I received an email letting me know that my camera had been handed in. I never had the opportunity to thank the kind person who took the returned my camera to me, exactly as I'd lost it. So, kind person, if you are reading this - thank you!

  • I was at my lowest ebb; my husband had left me the week before and I'd just started a challenging job in Central London. On a packed Tube someone knocked my bag, all my paperwork spilled across the carriage - I broke down in tears. One woman came and sat with me, she put her arm around me, asking whether there was anything she could do to help. Someone else picked up my things. It was very comforting to feel that, although usually people keep themselves to themselves, when someone is in need Londoners step up to help.

  • There was a woman on the phone to her friend talking about the break up of her relationship. She was so upset she was talking really loudly and not caring that the whole carriage could hear. Her partner was moving out and wouldn't tell her why he was leaving and she started crying about how much she loved him and was begging him to stay. It was awful because everyone felt sorry for her but couldn't do anything. Suddenly a man stood up and ushered her into his seat and I thought "Now you know not all men will break your heart, some are kind and gentle".

  • A few hours ago, I was sitting on the Central line in floods of tears because I had just decided to stop seeing my boyfriend, after having just had (another) massive argument with him. I was also fired from my job yesterday! So things are looking really bleak, and I just burst into tears and could not stop. A young female came and sat down next to me and said "I'm so sorry, but I just can't bear to see you crying like this. Are you OK? Do you want a cuddle?" She then gave me a massive hug and we looked at each other and she said "This is really weird isn't it?" She then talked me through my problems and told me that she was sure it was all for the best that everything was happening at the same time. She also took my number and name down and said she would send me a text to make sure I was OK, and that perhaps we could meet up for a drink one day. I have no idea if I will ever hear from Lauren again, but the fact that a complete stranger went out of her way to talk to me, and be so kind, generous and open is amazing to me.

  • I was standing in a crowded Central line carriage when a man tapped me on the shoulder and told me I had a spider in my hair; I think my face said it all and he offered to remove it. When I was spider free, I thanked him, we shared a smile and then carried on with our day.

  • My raincoat got totally wedged in and stuck between the seat and the wall on the DLR this morning. When the doors opened at my stop, I was frantically trying to pull my coat free. Thinking I would have to ride the DLR until I was free, the guy sat opposite got involved and helped. Bit of a Mr Bean moment pulling at this coat tail, but thanks a lot to this kind stranger who helped in my moment of panic and meant I didn't have to miss my stop.

  • A tired dad was struggling to keep his two wee, crying, children entertained. The gentleman sat across from the trio, if I may say, was dressed rather plainly, toying with a large cardboard tube. He tipped it up and produced a surprising fistful of magestic peacock feathers and tickled the kids' noses with them. It made the whole carriage giggle hearing the resulting squeals of delight from the kids. And the grateful father emitted the most relieved sigh I've heard in a long time.

  • My colleague wondered why she got a text from me to say 'whoever answers please reply'. Unbeknown to me I had dropped my work mobile phone at Canning Town rushing from the Jubilee Line to the DLR and the finder - later identified as a delightful young woman called Lucy - was trying to reunite the phone with its owner. Lucy and I subsequently spoke to each other to arrange a rendezvous at Stratford Station after work - Lucy acted as if I was doing HER a favour. My phone was duly returned to me saving me a lot of inconvenience. Thank you Lucy you have a beautiful spirit.

  • I had just moved to London with three heavy luggages and little else. I couldn't find my hotel or even get up the stairs, so an older lady took pity on me. She went so far as to take the Tube with me to where I was going, and helping me with my bags though they were far too heavy for her. Without her kindness I'd probably still be stuck on the streets, trying to find my way!

  • I was on the Tube and I noticed that the young woman opposite me was crying. At first I did nothing, then I asked her where she was getting off. I also got off at the same stop. We chatted and she was crying because her Dad had very recently been diagnosed with motor neurone disease. I walked with her until we had to go towards different train lines. She had stopped crying and was really grateful.

  • I've lived in London and used the tube all my life with no trouble. One night, though, a disturbed man attacked me on a late night Tube. He was chased off one stop later by London Transport staff who spotted what was happening - but none of the men in the the carriage had even tried to help. I felt as shaken by that as much as by the unprovoked violence itself. Then an Italian teenager who was sitting nearby introduced herself as we got off at the same stop. It turned out she'd only been in London for three weeks and was working late at a takeaway place. She shared her pizza with me and walked me all the way home. By the time I opened my door I was feeling completely reassured - and it was a lovely reminder that newcomers have something to teach us lifelong Londoners too.

  • A City banker stopped at the top of the stairwell and offered to take my heavy bag down three flights of stairs and on to the train. I was wearing an Amnesty International badge and he asked me if I knew about Liberty - I didn't. I searched it on the web later and signed a Liberty petition to stop Westminster Council from banning soup runs for the homeless at Victoria.

  • I was on the Tube after a particularly filling lunch. It wasn't until I got off the Tube, and the kind sweet smiling lady that gave me her seat was still on the Tube, I realised that she thought my abdomen was full with a baby rather than full with food!

  • When I was small my mum and I were on the Tube, and opposite us sat a fairy godmother, twinkling with sequins and magic, her hair piled high and her dress bulging across the seats. 'Isn't she beautiful!?' i exclaimed. And HE really was.

  • Coming home from work in the cold dark of a London December, I board the Northern line and am greeted with the sound of Christmas carols coming from a small ghetto blaster. Some university students have lit-up the whole carriage with Christmas decorations and are singing along with passengers and passing out mince pies and Christmas chocolates. Re-affirmed my faith in tough times, even if just for a moment... http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150297278918713.353177.506928712&l=098a62e4eb&type=1

  • I was visiting London, which was my first time in a city, and went to a festival and subsequently lost all my friends. After the festival ended I waited at the station but they didn't show. The station was packed and I didn't know how to get home or even where I was. A young drunk guy rushing past stopped and helped me get home. That wasn't the last time I relied on a stranger for help. You're good people, you Londoners.

  • Leaving Oxford Circus, into torrential rain. As I stare at the rivers forming in the gutter, a lass walks past with a golf umbrella. "Plenty of room under here for two!", she said. And there was!

  • The platform worker at Waterloo Station calls the announcements like it's a major sporting event! His enthusiasm is that little ray of sunshine needed to brighten up even the most boring of commutes

  • Since moving to London a year ago, possibly one of my hardest moments I've had to face was turnng around to spy my purse remaining on the platform as the doors closed and the Tube departed. That purse had a wad of cash, my passport, phone and all bank cards in it! By the time we reached the next station I was distraught, and when someone finally got down to check, my bag was gone. Without much hope I called my phone over and over. The man who'd found my purse eventually answered and directed me to his work. He worked in a bakery and handed my purse back to me with everything still inside- he wouldn't even accept the £20 I tried to force upon him! I still think of his kindness and how much difference it made to me, especially at such a pivotal point in my life

  • A small boy in his mother's arms waved at the train driver as he pulled into East Finchley station (above ground). The train driver smiled and waved back.

  • It was on the eve of Obama's election. I was coming home on the Central Line to Ealing, the last stop. An old man, passed out, smelling and wearing no shoes was lying across the seats. Two Polish builders sitting across from him got up to get off the Tube. As they did, one shoved a wad of money into the old man's jacket pocket. I thought that maybe a better world is possible and that it was a sign Obama would be elected that night.

  • During rush hour, standing on a crowded Central line Tube at Stratford I, very suddenly, started feeling woozy. I was just thinking I should step out of the train a when the doors closed. As the train moved from the open air into the tunnel I felt worse quite quickly and was on the verge of fainting. At that moment the woman next to me saw my face and said "you look really ill" - I managed to say that I thought I was going to faint andshe kindly asked the person sitting nearest her if they would let me have their sit which they kindly did. I thanked them and got off at the next station. I think her asking for a seat on my behalf probably stopped a longer delay as if I'd fainted someone may have pressed the emergency button and caused a longer delay for everybody so she didn't just do me a favour, she prevented a great many people being delayed.

  • I was wearing a smart dress to work which was a little tight. I stood up for the whole journey on the central line. As I was getting off a lady sitting behing me pointed out that my dress had split all the way up the back - it was past my knickers. A group of strangers had witnessed that but this kind lady saved me from showing off my underwear to my entire office of colleagues, as I have to walk through a large open plan area to get to my desk. I was able to cover up by tying my jacket (which I was holding) around my waist until I could get to the toilets and sew it up. Thank you.

  • I was standing on the packed morning rush hour Tube to Canary Wharf when I started to feel faint. My vision went blurred but someone had seen me looking pale, got up and was tugging me towards their seat. Feeling confused, I bolted off the train and stumbled onto the escalator at Canary Wharf to get some fresh air. As I reached the top I did indeed pass out, was caught by someone behind me and ushered over to LU staff who were so kind to me. They brought me water, offered me an ambulance and, when I felt better, one young male member of staff walked me to my office. It's nice that some commuters are actually looking out for their fellow passengers, and the staff, although busy, couldn't have been kinder.

  • I was struggling with several heavy suitcases at the bottom of the Tube station steps, trying desperately to get to my new flat. The kindest girl I've ever met not only carried my bag up the stairs, but dragged it around with me while I found a cash point and cab. Thank you Marilyn for saving me that day!

  • A girl was eating sweets and threw every wrapper on the floor. All of us in the carriage stared at her and tutted but no one said anything. The girl got off and we all muttered about how rude she was. Then one woman walked over and picked up all the wrappers. I felt she put us all in our place.

  • I am a Station Supervisor for London Underground, on my train journey into work from my home at the far side of Kent, I received a phone call from my sister in Liverpool. My mother was seriously ill and likely to die. I was working the night shift at the time, so as I knew I would be unable to travel up country until the morning I carried on into work. Early the next morning after buying my ticket to Liverpool I realised that my London Underground uniform was not going to be enough to see me through the next, probably harrowing week. I caught the tube down to Oxford Circus to Marks & Spencer to equip mysef. The shop was closed. There were, even at that early hour, workers on the floor setting up for the day's trade. Seeing my uniform they let me in, arranged for a personal shopper and guided me round the clothes section. Patient and kind as they were, I know part of their kindness was due to my uniform. My mother survived to speak to me and tell me how much she loved me, I wore Marks & Spencer to the funeral six days later.

  • On my way back home late at night after a Take That concert I saw a very drunk lady get on the tube with what I assumed was a friend. It soon transpired that the other lady had found the drunk girl on the platform. She found out where she lived, sat her down and made sure she changed at the right place and had someone waiting for her at the other end. The drunk girl cried while thanking her for restoring her faith in people by looking after her, and it restored mine as well.

  • After leaving my rucksack on a packed Central line Tube, I gave up hope of ever seeing it again. Imagine my surprise when two weeks later it was returned to me intact via Tfl. Not only did I get my belongings back, but it restored my faith in the kindness of Londoners. I never got to say thank you until now.

  • When I got on the central line this morning I slipped and caught my foot. When I sat down I noticed that I had somehow sliced my foot open and blood was pouring out. The lady opposite me gave me two wet wipes and a plaster! What a Gem

  • I was waiting on the platform of the Underground station one hot summer's day,when a young man came up to me and put his hand down the back of my dress.I started to reel away in shock, when he pulled out his hand, and closed in his fist was a bee which he'd just caught flying down my frock.

  • A Japanese man was sitting opposite me on the Central Line making something in paper - I was totally transfixed - forget all manners and was just staring at what he was creating in front of me. It was a unicorn, we had a brief chat and then he gave me it. I still have it and keep it in a cabinet

  • I witnessed someone helping a blind man get a seat this evening - no easy feat in the rush hour

  • I started to have a panic attack on the Tube, I had to get off at Victoria where I collapsed on the platform. A lovely lady helped me, gave me water, held my hand and stayed with me the whole time while I calmed down. She knew she would be late to work but stayed anyway with me. She was my rush hour angel!

  • One morning on a busy District Line train to work, we were just pulling out of Earl's Court when there was suddenly lots of shouting at the end of the carriage - somehow, a mother and her young son had been separated, with the mother still on the platform and the son on the train. Everyone in the carriage reacted quickly, and all the emergency levers were pulled, stopping the train. We all made way for the boy to be let off, and mother and son were reunited, thanks to the quick reactions of a few commuters.

  • I suffer from arthritis. This isn't at all obvious and from first impressions I look like a healthy 30 year old. One day I was in a lot of pain and there were no seats available. A young bloke looked at me and must have seen the pain in my eyes. He promptly stood up and offered me his seat.

  • I was taken ill on the platform at Canary Wharf just after buying my ticket. The staff were incredibly kind, helpful and friendly, and as a visitor to London I felt welcomed to the city. Thank you to the staff who helped me that day!

  • My partner and I were wandering late on a Saturday night through Liverpool St Station when we saw a little old lady, with luggage, looking slightly lost. We hesitated. I thought she looked vulnerable amidst the drunken crowds. And she'd missed the last Overground train. So we accompanied her to an outlying Tube stop and waved her off from there on a small-hours bus home.Going out of our way turned out to be joyously rewarding because she was wonderful: not vulnerable at all; spry; bright, fascinating; a dealer in antique botanical books just back from a fair, aged about 80! Wish I had her email and could be friends forever.

  • After traveling for 24hrs I got a Tube from Heathrow to Arnos Grove. Being extremely exhausted I was in despair when I saw two flights of stairs to the exit. As I struggled with my suitcase a young man came back down the stairs to my rescue. Then when I got to the exit I asked staff to point me in the direction of my destination. To my surprise one escorted me to the taxi office across the street of the station. After witnessing rudeness on my Tube journey I got two acts of kindness in the end.

  • I suddenly couldn't walk, whilst trying to get home on the Tube. One of the Tube employees helped me on the train at one end, and called ahead to the other. I thought I was alright at the other end - when 'woomp!' - couldn't walk again. It scared me so much I was in tears! A very kind woman employee of the Tube took me to sit down 'backstage' and gave me tea with sugar, and a chat while I recovered, then helped me get to a taxi. I'd been so scared, and was so grateful that when you really need help, people see that and come to your rescue!

  • I was on the way to school aged 17 and felt very ill at Earls Court station. A woman in a red woollen cape came and sat next to me on the bench and put her arm round me and looked after me. She helped me to the toilets and then seeing I was no better put me in a cab to go home to Putney and paid the driver £20 to get me there. This was 19 years ago and I have never forgotten this wonderful act of kindness. There are angels in the world.

  • One day when I was pregnant and feeling very tired travelling on the Tube, I asked a handsome young man if I could sit down. He gave me his seat, and smiling with good humour and chivalry he said to me, "Now you can name your child Ben!" I smiled too, (even though at the time I guessed I would have a girl), because Ben is one of my favourite names. I did call my baby Benjamin.

  • I accidently picked up another copy of the morning's Metro instead of the Evening Standard on my way home. A lovely gentleman offered to share his paper with me and ripped his paper in half and offered me the half he had already read! Such a nice thing to do.

  • I had a stubborn cold and an embarrassing coughing fit. The person next to me ostentatiously moved carriages, but a woman opposite offered me her water. The next stop was mine so I declined, shaking my head and smiling through my coughing. Weeks later I found I was sitting next to her, I was able to say thank you, cough-free.

  • I saw a lady carrying some heavy suitcases near King's Cross, so I offered her a hand up the stairs, she accepted but then we both began to struggle and a man came up and also offered help. He took one suitcase whilst I took the other. Another man saw this and offered to carry my bag. We ended up all carrying each others bags and laughing all the way up the stairs. We were all smiles.

  • Running down the stairs to catch the train that had just pulled in, I hadn't noticed my iPod falling out of my pocket until I was inside the carriage, watching a stranger pick it up off the wet platform floor. He looked up at me through the closing doors (while I had already assumed that I probably wouldn't be seeing it again) and mouthed the words 'I'll wait here!' through the glass. And he did.

  • I love starting and ending my day at Clapham South Tube station. They play classical music into the station which relaxes you as you enter, and they use one of the boards in the foyer to write a 'thought for the day' which changes every single day without fail, it puts a smile on the faces of locals and tourists - brilliant staff that show kindness to everybody!

  • It had been a long day and the commute home was crowded, but a big smile spread across everyone's faces when the Tube driver pretended we were on a plane. Each time we reached a new station he would tell the people getting off to have a great day, and welcome those getting on. He would also inform us of our altitude and temperature at our destination. It relaxed everybody!

  • My daughter Rebecca was on the underground, it was her 21st Birthday. Her friend Jessica was travelling with her. The train stopped. Suddenly Jess said in a big loud voice, 'It's my friends birthday can we sing for her.' The people started singing and smiling.

  • I had slept through my alarm and was very late for work. When I touched my oyster on the yellow circle, I was out of credit. The driver shook his head at my ten pound note. A lady behind me reached into her purse and I held out my note for change, but she put £2.20 on the tray and walked on. I stepped down and turned towards the newsagent but the bus didn't move. I heard the driver call out and as I turned back a passenger said, "She's paid for you, love."

  • While on my second maternity leave, I was travelling from Dollis Hill to Crouch End to visit a friend for lunch. After 2 changes and 3 tubes I got to Finsbury Park only to find me, the toddler and the baby in the pram at the bottom of 3 flights of stairs. My heart sank. As it was lunchtime, the station was quiet and I wasn't too happy to see 2 hooded young men loping down the stairs but as they got to bottom they asked if they could help by taking the pram leaving me to carry the toddler. They carried it up the 3 flights safely and even missed their train to do so! I always think of them when people use the term 'hoodie' as a generic term for violent youth because their kindness made my day and challenged my lazy assumptions.

  • As I stepped off the tube at Waterloo in the middle of the evening rush hour, the bottom of a bag I was carrying split. Scattering the contents, including many loose sheets of paper, across the platform. Three people stopped and helped me gather my belongings together, with one lady making sure I had another bag to carry my things.

  • I was on my way home on the Central Line one Sunday afternoon, hunched over and crying for most of the journey and couldn't stop. It was a low point in my life and I felt very isolated. When I got to my stop, I looked up and the woman opposite leaned over and handed me a tissue. It was such a kind gesture and made me feel less alone.

  • My husband and I (83 and 77 years) travel frequently on the underground. Almost without exception fellow passengers on a crowded train will offer their seats, and yet a further seat to allow us to sit together. I thankfully decline the latter, (jokingly) explaining that we have been sitting together for the last 60 years and it's quite nice to have a change!! Offers of help with heavy bags too are so very much appreciated.

  • I was crying on the tube and as I got off at my stop a man put his hand on my shoulder and said, 'Everything will be alright, you know,' and walked off. I suddenly felt a bit more hopeful.

  • I cried on the Victoria line, last Friday. Boy trouble. When I got off at Stockwell a girl of about 22 came running up to me to see if I was OK. She gave me a hug and looked right into my tear soaked eyes and said 'sometimes you just need a hug from a random stranger on the tube.' As she walked off in the opposite direction I realised she was right. She'll never know how much her kindness meant to me.

  • After receiving my less-than promising AS Level results I started crying on the tube, a woman came and sat next to me, gave me a hug and a tissue and told me it would be alright in the end. She was right, of course.

  • I've lots of lovely stories after 45 years of Tube travel. The best include the kind teenage Chelsea supporter who returned a bag of expensive Christmas presents to me by running very fast to catch me when I'd left them behind: the punk who always helped me down the station stairs with my baby buggy & would chat to my toddler son who loved his smiley face and pointy hair; & the lovely American tourists who I helped by showing them a route back to Heathrow which didn't include any stairs (they had heavy luggagge). And the drivers who keep us up to date when we're stuck in tunnels, especially when they tell jokes!

  • Returning to work after this intense period of activity and grief following the death of my husband's dad I stepped onto the tube at Seven Sisters and felt sadness rush through me. I covered my face with my hands and cried. As the train pulled into Victoria I was momentarily engulfed in a soft, warm and perfumed embrace. When I looked up I saw a woman in a fur coat swish through the closing doors. An angel of compassion. I will never forget that moment.

  • Seven or eight years ago at Camden Town I slipped on the down escalator just before it got to the bottom, because my shoes were slippy from rain. I tried to get up but my rucksack pulled me back down again. A man who had just got off the escalator saw and came back and dragged me to my feet. He left before I could thank him. Thank you kind stranger.

  • In my local Tube station there was an LU worker standing at the barriers who used to say to me " you should leave the house a little bit earlier love" as every morning I would rush through - dropping my gloves, Oyster card, leaving my purse at home. One day I got a call on my mobile phone... we found your laptop in the lift... As I dash through I still look out for him - but he's no longer working there.

  • I was really ill with food poisoning but had to go and meet my Mum who had come down to London for a series of birthday treats I had organised. I had to get off the bus three times to be sick and the third time, when I was on my knees crying and vomiting, a lovely lady got off her bike, gave me tissues and a bottle of water to help me. It really meant the world to me at that moment.

  • One morning on the Jubilee Line a woman lent over and removed a small amount of shaving foam I'd somehow left on my ear. On an over-crowded train to Canary Wharf, it made me and the person next to me smile. Literally, a touching act of kindness (or mercy?)

  • I left my expensive new mobile on the seat at Kingsbury. When I got home I called it and a stranger picked up. He took a detour on his way home that night to meet me at the station and give me back my phone. Thank you!

  • I was shivering with flu on the Northern line one winter day, and was feeling so sick I completely forgot I'd left my gloves in my lap while sitting down. When I stood up to leave the crowded train, the gloves fell without me noticing. A man grabbed them, dashed after me into the Bank rush hour crowds, and pushed them into my hands, before managing to run back into the train as the doors closed. I wasn't able to say thank you until now.

  • A few years ago, I got up to get get off the Tube, the Tube came to a sudden standstill, I started to fall backwards, it felt like slow motion and I could see all the people's faces around me change into an expression of shock and horror, they all reached out and held me as I fell and I gently landed in their arms, and was then gently stood back on my feet, now their faces were smiling and glad. I walked off the Tube feeling very cared for and happy.

  • I received a phone call that my fiancee had had a bike accident and was in the hospital.On my way there,I was so distressed and was crying on the tube. A girl sat next to me,asked me what happened,held my hand,said comforting words and gave me bottle of water.That meant so much to me.

  • One busy evening a child was crying so much I looked up from reading. His large purple helium balloon was escaping up away, out of his sight. Like a gentle relay-race it was passed back the entire length of the very crowded carriage. Everyone was smiling at the task - not just the boy once he got his balloon back!

  • My sister and I were coming home from a lovely evening out. The train wasn't very crowded, but someone spotted a bottle of bubbles that had been left behind on the seat by someone. To our amusement the guy started blowing bubbles in the carriage and then passed the bottle onto the woman next to him. We all took turns blowing bubbles in and carriage and giggling together. When it got to my turn, I took the stick and held it over the air conditioner, the bubbles that were formed floated down to the end of the carriage where more people laughed. The laughs we had that evening lasted all the way home.

  • I was travelling to work on the tube one morning after recently breaking up with my partner. I had tears streaming down my face although I was trying my best not to cry. The lady opposite me just touched my knee and handed me a tissue and smiled. It was the sweetest, nicest thing which made me cry even more!

  • I was 18 years old & on my way to work during rush hour, before going on holiday later that evening. So I had a huge suitcase and two other large, heavy bags. I am quite a small girl with not much strength and was dreading having to get all of this stuff onto the Tube during rush hour. But at every possible moment, men helped me without even asking, carrying my bags up stairs, making room for them on the tube,without any sense of annoyance. It was lovely!

  • I wasn't having a good morning on the tube. I was running about forty-five minutes late to work, thinking far too much about sad things and getting embarrassed because I could tell other passengers could probably tell I was upset. A couple opposite me got up to get off at Notting Hill Gate and as they did, the man handed me a slip of paper. I was a bit worried it would be some kind of religious sales pitch (which I really was not in the mood for) but inside was the message: EVERYTHING WILL BE OK! It had a bit of a mixed effect on me to be honest. On the one hand it made me happy that someone had broken through that London Tube social barrier to say something nice to a total stranger. On the other I wanted to explain part of what I was upset about, the thing that wasn't and won't be ok. Overall though, all the stuff that kicked this off, the stuff I can change - that will be ok. Eventually. Originally posted with photo at http://moblog.net/view/309647/a-tube-story

  • Between Victoria and Vauxhall, I was weeping. A woman asked me gently, "Are you alright, my dear?" And I said, "No. My father died." She moved to sit next to me and held my hand. I talked about my father's love. She talked about losing her son. She closed her eyes, and as she prayed to Jesus, I prayed to Allah, for the strength to walk that chasm where grief resides. At Vauxhall, I left, saying goodbye to a woman whose name I do not know, but who had reached deep into my heart.

  • I was standing in a fully packed Northern line train and being pushed at every station when a man next to me complained I was leaning on him. I was feeling down and his comment seemed so unfair. I could not believe it when a smiling nice man wished me a wonderful day as he got off at london bridge. He made my day become wonderful from then on.

  • Many years ago when I was about 12 or 13, my mum sent me to the shops with a 20 pound note to do some shopping for her. I met a friend at Balham tube station but when I got to the shops i realised I had lost the 20 pounds. I knew my mum would go balistic and started freaking out. On the off chance I asked the tube staff at the ticket window if they had found the 20 pounds...unbelievably someone had found it and handed it in and my life was once again worth living! Forever grateful to that honest person who handed in the money.

  • A few years ago I was suffering during a horrible break-up. Suddenly on the commute to work I found the tears rolling down my face. I buried myself in the packed carriage so no one would see. Then, as I was getting off a few stops later, a young woman took my hand in hers and whispered in my ear, "You're going to be OK you know". I still think of her as my 'underground angel'.

  • This is a bit embarrassing to admit, and totally irrational as I'm a Londoner and have been getting the Tube all my life! Earlier this year I suddenly began to get very panicky when the Tube is stuck in a tunnel, especially in rush hour. One afternoon the train ended up stuck in a tunnel outside Queensway for about 20 minutes. I became extremely panicky and asked the woman next to me would she mind speaking to me as I felt a bit strange. She said 'You spoke to the right person - I'm a therapist.' She talked to me about how normal it is to sometimes feel claustrophobic. It turned out she was a beauty therapist and just used to making people feel at ease! I am so grateful to that really lovely woman for comforting me when I felt unhappy. For the record, the Tube has gradually got easier ... I think I learned something from that experience.

  • I was on my way home to Brighton from working in Dundee. I was tired after a long train journey but I stopped to give a woman begging on the platform at Victoria my dinner. I hope she enjoyed it more than I ever would.

  • I find that I often observe or participate in small acts of kindness on the tube (central line mostly), usually things like helping an old lady down stairs, giving up my seat to someone who needs it more than I do or helping carry a pushchair for example. However sometimes an act of kindness can be a little more unusual - a couple of months ago I was travelling on the tube when a girl got on and sat opposite me, fished a pretty, but horribly broken string of beads out of her bag, and proceeded to attempt to mend it. I watched her for a few minutes trying in vain to put these beads back together then offered to try to mend the necklace for her, as although I had no tools with me, I thought I may be a little more successful - I'm a jewellery designer by profession and it just seemed like it was one of those fated moments! I managed to put her pretty necklace back together just as the doors opened on my stop! It was a nice thing to do; she was delighted that her necklace was again wearable and I was happy that I'd been able to help... I think it's karma - do good things and good things happen!

  • I visited London and was delighted to be given directions on many occasions on how to reach my destination using the correct exits etc by smiling, friendly and gracious Underground Staff. This advice was often offered without me even requesting it, I was probably studying my A to Z at the time and looking puzzled. These kind gestures, and the warm and generous way in which they were delivered, definitely brightened my day and made my experience of travel within London much more enjoyable. I felt proud to be British.

  • I was in the pit of a severe depression, sitting on the Tube, staring at my knees, trying not to cry. I could just see the man opposite me, folding a piece of paper. The train stopped and in my lap the man placed the piece of paper, which he had folded into a beautiful little white horse. He smiled and left the train. A light appeared in the pit.

  • I was on the Northern Line heading to Embankment after a traumatic morning. I'd had a severe allergic reaction to some air freshener, my eyes were still streaming, I was covered in hives and was visibly wheezing/sniffing. I sat opposite a lady in a smart suit for several stops and, as she stood to get off at Camden, she thrust a Boots bag into my hand. With a smile, she said "You need this more than I do", then disappeared into the crowds of alighting tourists. I laughed when I opened the bag, and kept smiling for the rest of the day. Inside was an unopened box of antihistamines.

  • I lost my phone on the Victoria line, and thought it was gone forever. A very nice lady found it and took the time to go through the phone to find my sister's number to call and arrange to get it back to me. She had a similar situation the week before where someone returned her phone, and was returning the good karma! Bless you x

  • I've been travelling on the tube regularly with my son since he was 5 weeks old and what has enabled me to do this is that regardless of which station we are at someone always stops to help me lift his buggy up and down stairs. People say that Londoners can be unfriendly but my experience of travelling with a small child is exactly the opposite.

  • The day I found out my dog had bone cancer, I sobbed all the way home from work from Vauxhall to Edgware. Most people stared at me, but when I got to Golders Green a wonderful couple gave me a tissue, checked I was ok and talked to me for the rest of my journey. Simple, but something I'm eternally grateful for.

  • I was on the tube and noticed a girl sitting opposite me, sobbing. My fellow commuters all looked very uncomfortable and stared downwards, clearly embarrased. I went and sat on the empty seat next to the girl, gave her a tissue and asked her what was wrong. She replied that she was ok and blushed. 5 minutes later, she looked up at me, smiled through her tears and mouthed "thank you". When she got off at the next stop, everyone looked up from their papers and started talking to eachother. "That was very thoughtful" "I wasn't sure if it would help or not" "I'll help next time".

  • Moments after taking a photo of an Acts of Kindness poster - with hopes I would experience one to report some time - I noticed a woman walking towards me with her flies undone. I caught her attention and discreetly alerted her. She blushed and thanked me as she zipped up.

  • I was on the last Piccadilly line train, a swelteringly hot Thursday at the height of summer. Although fine when I boarded, I soon started to feel strange and lost my vision. Confused and scared, I tried in vain to get off the crowded train. Four strangers looked after and comforted me, took my jacket off; a girl gave me her drink, putting the straw in my mouth. My vision returned as quickly as it had faded and I only managed to see them briefly and say one quick 'thank you' before I reached my stop and stumbled off in a daze. I'll never forget their kindness.

  • This happened some years ago but I have never forgotten it. One rush hour, whilst running up the crowded stairs from the Central Line platform at Tottenham Court Rd, a young lady stepped out of her court shoe. The young gentleman directly behind her picked it up and replaced it gently on her foot. So kind - and so romantic!

  • It was a hot packed tube on the way to a punk show and had my paper fan with me due to the heat. A father with his small daughter in his arms was squashed next to me and asked if I minded fanning his daughter, which I did for about two stops until they got off. Sore wrist, but good feeling.

  • Late for work running up a busy tube escalator very early in the morning, I fell onto my knees. I didn't realise it at the time, but I had cut them quite badly and had gone into slight shock. Arriving at the tube platform I felt faint and had to sit on a bench with my head in my hands. Everyone let me be until I felt a hand on my shoulder and looked up to see this extremely tall man dressed in full evening suit: bow tie and all. He asked if I was ok, got the station staff, who were wonderful, and disappeared. Sounds corny, but I felt he was my guardian angel that day: wonderfully dressed at 7am.

  • Hello, Me and two other members of The Kindness Offensive headed down to Hampstead Tube Station with a load of lovely cuddly toys with a mind to do some Random Acts of Kindness for some unsuspecting youngsters (and their parents). It was dead exciting checking the trains as they came in for buggies and little people. When we spotted one, we bounced up to them presenting the toys. The kids were obviously quick to grab the cuddly animals and crack a big smile; the parents after a moment of hesitation joined in the fun; Kindness on the Tube is the best way to travel, we all had a great time and the kids left giggling clutching their new fluffy animal friends! Don't 'mind the gap between computers, try bridging it with Kindness for a better service on all lines... that's what we say ;) Click the links to see two of our favorite pics from the day: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kindnessoffensive/5887283396/in/photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/kindnessoffensive/5886718275/in/photostream

  • I was traveling from Coventry to Guildford and had missed the last possible train at Watford Station. In tears at the prospect of spending the night lost in Watford, I began to panic. A man asked me what was wrong, and then told me that I could still get to Guildford if I took a train to Euston first, and that there was one just pulling in behind me. Having not intended to go through London I did not have a travel card, so I was stuck again. The same man then arrived behind me and gave me his travel card before disappearing to buy himself a new one. I was so glad as I did not have the money for a new ticket! Thank you!

  • While walking between the Victoria Line and Central Line I heard a fella playing the clarinet; he looked hard done by. Passing by was an elderly gentleman, who from his appearance didn't seem to have better luck in life. This man stopped and took out a small purse of pennies. He took his time and counted a few up and placed them in the clarinet case. It was beautiful to see generosity, even from those who are struggling.

  • The train stopped for over an hour in a tunnel. This was during a hot summer spell. A young mother with a baby gave an older woman responsibility of her daughter whilst looking for an Underground worker. Another young lady shared her water with an older woman. Lighting shut down. We were eventually all cleared out of the carriages. Pregnant women and senior citizens first to leave. As we climbed down from the train, we were greeted by several members of staff on either side of the tracks, gently guiding us through. There were underground employees at the station handing out bottles of mineral water. The staff were organised and understanding in what would have normally proved a traumatic experience.

  • Rather extravagantly we'd splashed out on a bracelet for a friend's birthday from an expensive jeweller. My boyfriend offered to take it home and within two stops had forgotten all about it and left it on the train. It restored our faith in humanity when we found out that a tourist had handed it back into the shop.

  • My story is not definitely a heroic act nor a thrilling story with a happy end, however that day meant much for me. Around 2 years ago, I was having a bad time in my life. Many problems with my boyfriend were making me feel down and defeated. Every Friday evening, I used to take the Jubilee line to go to work in a bar in central London. During those 35 minutes the journey took, I would do nothing else than to be engrossed in my own thoughts about the situation I was going through. One day, a businessman sat in front of me. I didn't pay attention to him and I thought he didn't pay to me either, but just when he reached his station, he was about to get off and the doors of the train opened, he turned around to me and said "Cheer up, because you are gorgeous". He then dissapeared. No time for conversations, no flirting involved, just purely a nice word that brought me back to "life". Since that day, everytime I am on a bus or tube, feeling sad, I remember his words, and a smile appears on my face.

  • After a shopping trip to Oxford Street for school clothes and shoes my 3 year old daughter was playing play peek a boo with people on the Tube. As we got off the train we had bags, buggies and children to struggle with and inadvertly left the bag with all the new shoes in on the tube. After a week or so we were contacted by LT lost property and our property had been handed in at Bethnal Green. We were so relieved and grateful to those who handed it in as we were not working at the time. Thank you who ever you are!!

  • When the man in the seat next to me started snoring, I smiled to myself. A couple of people opposite me smiled back. It felt good to share a bit of warmth.
  • On a Friday night I boarded the train dressed up ready to go out and thinking I looked the bee’s knees. A woman came up to me, and very kindly, and quietly, told me I had my skirt tucked into my knickers.
  • I had been aware that someone was reading my paper over my shoulder for most of my journey. I normally find this quite annoying. But when I got off, I decided to turn and give it to them. They seemed so pleased and surprised, any irritation completely left me.
  • One day, the person sitting next to me, who was seeping tinny music into the carriage from their headphones, took one earplug out and said to me, “Can you hear this? Is it bothering you? I can turn it down if it is”. I was astonished. And even more astonished when I said, “No”.
  • I had a broken heart, and I was crying on the tube. A couple were sitting next to me. As they got off the train, the woman gave me a tissue. The man leaned towards me and said: "Just remember, every storm passes". I was overwhelmed by their compassion, and never forgot his words.
  • My dad has commuted to London every day for the past 30 years and always talks about how people in London walk with their heads down, minding their own business. One morning (about 20 years ago) an older man fell over on the platform and my dad helped him up whilst other people walked past minding their own business.The gent had to go to hospital and was injured. My dad has kept in contact with this gentleman who is still extremely thankful for my fathers assistance. Its nice to know that friendships can be born in the strangest of circumstances.
  • I was taken ill at Finsbury Park station and the tube staff were very good to me - they got me in the control room, made me tea and got me an ambulance. They called my office to let them know could not go to work. Later on at the hospital, I found out I was pregnant.
  • Carrying a 2 month old baby in the rush hour I had to get off a Victoria line train at Oxford Circus and was very scared about the crush of people ready to get on the train. I felt a pat on my back, and ignored it for a half second, then turned around to see that a lady had got up to give me the baby's bib that we had left on the seat (cost about 30p)! She might have lost her seat doing that too. I couldn't even thank her. But it made me feel much better
  • I walk with a stick and travel daily on the Central Line. I am grateful to the many unnamed people who are prepared to give up their seat for me. Thank you all.
  • I was attending wedding alone and this would have been the first "event" as it was without my ex, I was dreading the occasion. Confidence was low, rifling through my handbag I had lost my compact mirror. I peered into the tube window to try and make out my refection, when an elderly gentleman told me I looked wonderful, that act of kindness gave me such confidence.

  • On a Piccadilly Line train at Acton Town station, a lady got off the train and chased us the entire length of the platform which resulted in the train leaving without her in order to return my daughters DS that got left behind. I couldn't thanks her enough for doing that for us.
  • My sister, who was carrying a baby girl a few months old, was travelling with her husband. They were carrying stuff in both their hands. One group of about three children who were about 10 came forward to help carry the push chair up the stairs for them. After helping them, one of the child said to another, "you did you good deed for today". My sister came and told me this story that those children were consciously looking around to good deed. I personally helped a lady whose husband had gone up the escalator but she was having difficulty convincing her 3 year old daughter to climb the escalator. She couldnt carry her because she was holding push chair in her hands. I offered to carry her push chair so she can carry her child. Once we reached the top the couple were thankful. I was travelling with my sister and had just entered the tube and looked around to find any seat where both of us can sit together. There were plenty of single seats. After few seconds of looking around we just thought to stand when a gentleman in his 30s got up and moved to another seat so two seats can be empty together. I was really astonished and since then I always look around when I can offer the same for others. I just received my mother from airport and was travelling on district line with the luggage. As we got off the tube to climb the stairs a person came forward and offered to carry one of the luggage.
  • I overheard a woman standing next to me talking about how it was impossible to get tickets to a particular exhibition. Since I happened to work at the museum in question, I gave her some complimentary tickets I'd received with my payslip. It makes the journey more bearable if I can make it better for someone else.
  • I helped a lady all on her own with a buggy and three wheely bags up the steps at Victoria and she was SO grateful, i was so happy to have helped.
  • After being dumped in a public manner at Whitechapel station, I had to get on the train home and suddenly burst into tears on the phone to my best friend. A lovely man gave me a tissue and said 'He is not worth it.' Thank god he gave me it, as make up was running all over my face. He made the situation a little less embarrassing!
  • On a very hot and sunny rush hour morning, I was coming back from Heathrow on the tube. It was packed. One of the ladies standing up started feeling a little faint. Someone gave her a seat and some water. But the thing I'll never forget was the 2 spanish tourists, who broke out the giant tin of sweeties they'd bought at Duty Free. They thought some sugar would help, and then they offered everyone in the carriage one. Very cute.

  • Riding the Jubilee line home, a tired looking business man sat next to me. Within minutes he was asleep. And seconds later his head was on my shoulder. I was only on the tube for 4 stops, but I thought those might just be the 40 winks he needs, so I let him stay, and shared a smile with the rest of the carriage
  • Last Sunday I was at Embankment Station, with no money left on my Oyster Card. As I go to top up, a woman walks up to me and hands me an all day travelcard for Zones 1-4. It was probably the best thing ever.
  • having lost my phone on the tube i frantically tried to call it when i got off. A lovely lady rang back and said she found my phone. We met up at st pauls and we shared a lovely bottle of champs. thanks elga.
  • When two men, obviously travelling for business helped lift my mums rollator up the stairs, so she could walk up the stairs comfortably with my help.
  • I fainted on a very hot, very busy tube. When I came round, a lady was supporting my head. I was upset and started crying. She got off the tube with me at the next stop and sat with me until I felt better. After I while I was ready to get back on the tube and go to work. The lady asked where I was going. She said that she wanted make sure I got to work ok so she got off at my stop with me at Holborn and walked me to work. So kind and totally selfless.
  • Last Saturday evening, I was on the district line, from Hammersmith to Richmond. I was having an asthma attack, TWO different people came to my assistance. One wonderful lady, she was amazing, then another couple. There are caring people out there.

  • my daughter whilst travelling on the tube, over heard an elderly couple say where do we go now, so my daughter got off the train, asked them where they wanted to go, and then took them to the right platform, and stayed with them and saw them on the correct train, then went back to the platform she needed to continue her journey.
  • I had a broken foot in a big heavy foot support, travelling to see a show in london, numerous people stopped to help me on and off all the trains, even helping hold my handbag,getting of the train to hold my arm and get me to a seat, then they helped me off, this restored my faith in people and even the teenagers in school uniforms were so willing to help, more kindness showed to me than i would have thought, i was even considering not travelling at all, thank goodness i did!!!
  • I absent mindedly left my bag on the tube at hammersmith on the hammersmith & city line at the ticket barrier I realised my bag was missing so I hared back in a panic to search for it only to find the kind person who cleans the trains holding it for me. I cannot tell you how happy I felt.
  • My son was coming home to attend a wedding, but left his expensive new suit in the luggage rack on a Metropolitan Line train late one night. Although LUL Lost Property tried their best to help, there was no trace of it. Imagine our delight when next day there was knock at the door and a man who had found the suit delivered it back to us! Thank you Mr Parmar of Uxbridge for all the trouble you took in re-uniting the suit with its owner - an extraordinary act of kindness on the Underground.
  • Back in the last century (1986), a guy gave me his seat at Earl's Court on the District Line. I was really tired and fell asleep. When I got off at Upton Park, he was still standing - a hero! Even though it's been over 20 years, I still remember this act of kindness. Can't imagine he'd remember this story - but if he does, thank you.
  • Another passenger and I saw a spider crawling up the back of a man in front of us in a crowded carriage. Between us we flicked it to the floor and the man remained oblivious.
  • I was about to faint on the tube and a woman spotted me, asked if I was okay,helped me when I did faint, found me a seat afterwards, got off the train with me at the next stop and put me on the tube home. She then had to wait for another tube to continue on with her journey to work.
  • I always get on the train and look for a seat, I take a seat as quick as I can and tend to feel a bit guilty if I have raced a fellow train dweller to sit in the seat first but at each stop I always look up out of book for a wizened face or a protruding belly to whom my seat is more worthy. Without question I am more than happy to give my seat up. I always seem to notice that my fellow females will naturally look up expectantly to look out for that swell belly or the age challenged folk and give up their seat wholeheartedly. I look on and see the male faces sucked into the daily offering of free sponsored and paid for newspaper. They can't help their focused concentration, its set in their ways. This doesn't quantify the majority of the male species and once in a while there is a glimmer of hope for us all when we stop thinking about our enclosed world bubble and look out beyond our nose. One thing is certain, there is always a glimmer, a hope, spontaneous random acts that is possible in all of us and there is always room for unconditional kindness.

  • Saw a guy having a nose bleed a few weeks ago. Most people put the heads in papers, I gave him my packet of tissues. He was so grateful, it was my pleasure!
  • I forgot my ID and had already beeped into the tube station, but the tfl man beeped me out, told me he'd be there until I returned and when I came back he remembered and let me through again, surprisingly sweet.

  • I remember when I was younger, about a toldder, when I was sick in the train. Being on a crowded train is hard enough but being on a crowded train with the smell of sick only worsens the journey. But much to my mother's surprise and myself, many passengers offered me a tissue instead. This memory has always stuck with me. It was nice to see people cared.

  • It was my first day in London, I was overwhelmed, jet-lagged, it was raining, I could barely lift my suitcase, and it seemed that every station transfer I had included a flight of stairs. At each transfer someone stopped and helped me carry my bag up the stairs.
  • A good few years ago on a cold winter's day, I traveled up to London from the Home Counties to meet a friend who lives abroad. On my way home, at about 14:30 in the afternoon, I came out of Kings' Cross Underground to make my way to the main line station. A young man was sitting on the steps looking very forlorn and shouted out "got a ticket to spare?" I passed him and in a split second made a decision. I turned back and gave him my one-day travel card. Perhaps he was just cold and needed to get into the warm. Perhaps he needed the ticket to get to some safe haven. Whatever – it made my day to help him and it's something I have never forgotten.

  • 10 years ago I was a final year medical student revising frantically from a textbook that medics call the "cheese and onion". As I got off the train someone sidled up to me and asked "When are they?" "Next week" I replied "Good luck" he offered with an encouraging smile. It was such an amazing feeling to be reached out to like that. 10 years on I keep my eye out for someone reading a cheese and onion to have my chance to wish them luck.
  • I came across a couple struggling to get an enormous twin buggy down the stairs. As I helped them lift it down I dropped my Oyster card without realising. As I turned to leave when we reached the bottom of the stairs one of the little twins who has been watching the process wide eyed, tugged my hand and gave me my Oyster card before rushing to join her parents. Just too cute.
  • The gentle swaying of my train as I head for home out of the city and into the late evening countryside could cure the worst insomniac. To all those kind souls who have gently woken me at my stop, thank you
  • Ice Cold in Edgware: That hot summer of 1990, Friday Evening commute from London. Hotter and more overcrowded than normal thanks to problems on the line. Weary climb up the stairs towards the exit. At the top... staff waiting with free cups of ice cold orange squash for everybody. I've never said thank you properly, until now.
  • I was travelling back home after work one afternoon and two young sisters maybe 12-14 were talking to their parents about going back to their hotel and what possible things they would be doing in the evening, it didn't sound like much. Then one of the girls extended her headphone to the other and asked to listen, the girl replied that it wasn't working and the first girl checked and confirmed saying "oh i wish this would of happened while we were out, I could have bought some more". It came into my mind how boring your parents seem at her age and if I could go without music, knowing that I had a spare set in my bag I took them out and handed them to the girl, she was extremely thankful and her dad smiled an nodded at me and thanked me again before they left.

  • I am not a UK resident, so am not eligible, but I wanted to share this story. While visiting London on a school trip, I was riding the Tube. A fellow student and myself were obviously puzzled on how to get my cell phone to work, I have a global plan with Verizon and we needed a phone since we were traveling through three countries. A passenger asked if he could help, he said that he had friends in the American Embassy who have this problem. A few minutes later I received a text from his phone and mine was working. After a few days, he texted me to see if all was okay, with the phone. I am a dowdy housewife, going back to college and the passenger was a teenager so this was truly a random act of kindness.
  • This smartly dressed middle aged gentleman boarded the train at Gants Hill and stood next to me looking somewhat confused and lost. With an American accent he locked eyes with me as if to say "How do I get to my destination". This was a day where I was late for work and not my normal train time in the morning, however, I helped this gentleman nicknamed, Bud, to get to where he needed to be. We remaine good friends by mail for more than 30 years, saw me married, was my photographer at my wedding who came all the way from America. Sadly, he died privately with cancer and told no one apart from his close family. God Bless You.
  • Friday evening 17th June. A pretty, smart, business-type girl gave a homeless man a Crunchie bar from her handbag, as he made his way up the carriage after making a speech about trying to get to a shelter. The girl seemed embarrassed, she blushed. She ought not to have. I thought 'that would make a lovely art project/basis for a short story. Monday 20th June, I read about 'Acts of Kindness'
  • travelling with my son on tube at euston. my son was clearly in a lot of pain with his back and was sweating with discomfort, when a young woman pushed her way over and said she was a doctor at UCH and advised my son what to do. it didn't kill the pain but spiritually it made us feel really warm.
  • A woman got on the tube and was obviously distressed. She was fighting back the tears. She had to stand and everyone ignored her. I gave her my seat and handed her some tissues - while I was still plugged into my mp3 player. She mouthed the words "thank you". One stop later the seat next to her became free so I sat down and made her laugh by saying, "I gave up my seat and looked good to everyone and now I have a seat back." I gave her a small book of philosophical, humorous quotes I was carrying and said that things will get better. She thanked me and explained she was thinking of going back to Australia after a failed romance but that my act of kindness might just make her stay - it seemed that people weren't all bad after all. I wished her well, got off at the next stop and never saw her again - though I do wonder if she ever went back to Australia.

  • I was sitting opposite a little girl wearing glitter face paint after a party. She wanted to take the itchy sparkles off, but her mum didn't have a tissue. A very dusty builder standing nearby pulled a packet of facewipes out of his bag and offered them. They laughed and thanked him.

  • I saw a woman rushing for the train. She slipped and fell to her knees. But everyone around her stopped, scooped her up and made sure she got in the Tube car okay. It was amazing to see a crowd of strangers work together like that.
  • We had a mother and daughter come through the station asking what they could do for a day out in London on a one-day travel card. So I ended up making a document called "Suggestions for a Day out in London" to give to people when they ask.
  • When the man in the seat next to me started snoring, I smiled to myself. A couple of people opposite me smiled back. It felt good to share a bit of warmth.
  • On a Friday night I boarded the train dressed up ready to go out and thinking I looked the bee’s knees. A woman came up to me, and very kindly, and quietly, told me I had my skirt tucked into my knickers.
  • I was in a crowded area waiting for the lift. It was morning rush hour and you could feel the aggravation coming off people. Then suddenly, bizarrely, someone turned up in the queue with a puppy in their arms. The puppy was quite happy and blinking sleepily. People started noticing and a wave of warmth went through the crowd. Everyone visibly softened. It was a massive change of mood and it gave me an idea. I’d like it if someone could lay on a regular puppy greeting service for stressed out commuters.
  • I was on a hot train and suddenly felt faint. The woman sitting opposite me must have noticed I was looking unwell, and asked if I was OK. She gave me her newspaper to use as a fan and kept chatting to me reassuringly until I got off at the next stop.
  • One lady comes through the station who’s always smiling. She's lovely to staff. We've given her a couple of Christmas cards.
  • I had been aware that someone was reading my paper over my shoulder for most of my journey. I normally find this quite annoying. But when I got off, I decided to turn and give it to them. They seemed so pleased and surprised, any irritation completely left me.
  • During rush hour while the train was packed, I saw someone using a crutch get on. The vestibule was very crowded. But someone standing asked the nearest person sitting down to give up their seat, and helped the man using the crutch to get through the crowd and sit down. He seemed so relieved to have a seat, and I could see him chatting with the woman who gave up her seat until I got off the train.
  • A lady coming through the station, on her way back to South Africa, lost her passport and about £1,000 in traveller's cheques. She asked staff at another station to ring around to see if it had been found. Luckily we had it. She came back to collect them. When they returned from their trip, her child had made a card for us that said "You're my hero".
  • Two people next to me were trying to work out how to get to Bond Street. I showed them on the map. They gave me a bonbon to say thank you.
  • When I got on the Tube while heavily pregnant, I was really pleased when someone moved out of the priority seat they were sitting in to allow me to sit down. It meant I didn’t have to try to walk further down the carriage to reach a free seat while the train was moving.
  • The doors were about to close on a very full train when a flustered-looking woman carrying a large laptop bag tried to board. She couldn’t fit on, and in her desperation I heard her saying, “Can you move down? I need to get to an interview!” The carriage was chock-a-block. But I saw someone get out of the train and back onto the platform so she could take their place. From where I was on the platform, I could see her waving thanks through the window as the train pulled away.
  • Every year we get a Christmas card in the post. We don't know who it's from. It says, "Happy Christmas to all the staff at Holland Park, especially to the cleaners to say thanks for keeping the station clean". It's never forgotten, every year. We stick them up in the window.

  • In a busy carriage a lady laid a tissue over a seat which the previous occupier had told her was wet. As the train pulled into each stop she told each person who went to sit down. When she got off the train, someone else took on her took over her role, who passed it on when he left. I saw that keep happening till I left the train.
  • I ran the London Marathon in 2008. On the way home on the Tube, a family travelling next to us congratulated us on our challenge. The little kid said ‘you must be starving’ and got his mum to dig out the picnic they had been going out to have. We all shared the sausage rolls and satsumas.
  • Working on the gateline one day I helped a lady who didn't have enough money on her Oyster to get home. She was short by less than a pound and had had to travel to visit her son in hospital. I gave her the money and though no more of it. She returned a week later with a huge bunch of flowers, some chocolates, a Thank-You card and the money which I had given her!
  • The person sitting next to me on a pull-down chair got up to leave and for some reason, the person sitting next to him wanted to move over to the other pull-down chair. He scooted over, while still holding down the chair he was sitting on. When he was fully sitting on the other pull-down chair, he let the other one flip back up. But by this time someone had got on the train who thought it was a normal chair (because it was in the down position when the guy was holding it as he scooted to the next seat). He tried to sit down on it. But the guy had just taken his hand off it so he fell down! It was very funny and everyone was laughing. Then he showed me a text from his girlfriend and explained that this was why his head was all over the place and he had not noticed the chair was folding and had fallen down. The text was a ‘break up’ text and he seemed very sad. I said that I thought it would all be OK and tried to make him feel better. Then the person on the other chair next to him got involved and tried to make him feel better. We spoke about it on the way home and I got out, leaving him my Metro so he would have something to do on his way home.
  • I found I was a few pennies short when I went to buy my ticket. The person in the queue behind me immediately offered me some change. I was embarrassed but it really helped me out.
  • I always say hello to the staff on the gateline. They always give a cheery shout back.
  • Getting on the train, laden with shopping bags, I made my way to the nearest free seat, which happened to be covered with a newspaper, crisp packet and old sandwich box. I began putting my bags down to move it. But the man who had just got on next to me scooped it all up and out of my way.
  • I was coming back very early on Monday morning from a night out clubbing, feeling out of place in my hotpants amongst the morning commuters, I close my eyes for a moment, and next thing I know someone’s shaking my shoulder. ‘I didn’t think you would want to miss your stop --you look ready for bed,’ she said. Amazingly, she had woken me one stop before I had to get off.
  • Central line on Friday afternoon. Tired mother, grizzly toddler. A man opposite tears off 2 small pieces of his newspaper, sticks them to his index finger nails by licking them, rests them on his knees and recites, “Two small dickie birds sitting on a wall, one named Peter, one named Paul. Fly away Peter. Fly away Paul. Come back Peter. Come back Paul”. As he says “fly away”, he raises his hand behind his head, and when he brings it back to his knee, the newspaper “dickie bird” has flown away. He raises it again for “come back”, and they are back. The toddler is captivated, as are many of the rest of us watching. Peace reigns.
  • I was working in the station one day when a young mother approached me with her daughter who was in floods of tears. She'd dropped her favourite hat on the track. I retrieved it for her, and the pure joy I saw in that child's face warmed me for days. A few days later, the mother arrived at the station with a box of chocolates for me -- but better still, a card which her daughter had drawn herself. Life doesn't get much better than that.
  • I was hurrying off the train and up the escalator, and as I reached the top slightly puffed out from rushing, I felt someone touch my arm. I turned round, and there was a teenaged boy holding out my Oyster card. I hadn’t even noticed I’d dropped it. But he said he saw it fall as I got onto the platform, and had been trying to give it to me as I dashed up the escalator. Before I had much time to thank him, he headed off down the opposite escalator – he had come right up out of his way to give it back to me.
  • Two weeks ago I was on a very busy platform. The train pulled in and we waited to let some people off. The surge to then try and cram onto the space came quite quickly. Me being at the front, I didn’t quite have the space yet to put a foot on the train and so my leg slipped down between train and platform, taking me quite low and scraping my leg. A man next to me stepping put out his hand for me to grab as I went down and hoisted me back up. He then took my arm and steered me into the carriage.
  • One day, the person sitting next to me, who was seeping tinny music into the carriage from their headphones, took one earplug out and said to me, “Can you hear this? Is it bothering you? I can turn it down if it is”. I was astonished. And even more astonished when I said “no”.
  • The staff grow flowers at the station. They’re so bright and cheerful. It makes me happy. And I’m touched that someone would take that much care to make the station nice for everyone.
  • Someone looking lost on the platform asked me where they needed to change. I directed him but he still seemed confused. So I dug out my pocket tube map and gave it to him. We ended up getting on the same train and chatting all the way until he got off.
  • It was the first day on my job working on the station gateline. I went to the shops in my lunch break. When I got back to work I put my hand in my pocket and my staff pass was gone. After work I walked round the shops for an hour retracing my steps. I was getting beyond upset – I didn’t want to lose my pass on my first day! I got to the last shop I’d been to and asked if they’d seen my pass. He held it up – he’d kept hold of it for me.
  • The other day there was a man sitting quietly reading on the train beside me for about twenty minutes. I didn’t really notice him until he looked up and stretched. Then he turned to me and said, “I’ve just finished this brilliant book. Would you like it?” He gave it to me! It was set in Victorian London. I started it but didn’t enjoy it so much. So I gave it to my mum who liked it.

  • I was trying to pass an elderly man in the train to get off. By coincidence we both kept stepping in the same direction. As we eventually got round each other, he joked, “You dance divinely!” I was feeling a bit bothered by the experience but that made me laugh. It was a sweet thing to say and it made an annoying situation fun. That’s a form of kindness, I think.

  • There’s a guy who works at Holborn station. A lady came up to him asking for the eye hospital. He explained she’d come to the wrong station but she didn’t believe him. She went off. Eventually she came back and said, okay, you’re right. So he gave her really detailed instructions straight from his head for how to get to the right place. He does that for tourists all the time. They call him Google Gaz at the station because of his incredible memory.
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